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THB 


DUBLIN 


Stiiiij^rjsttn  Cakntrar, 


FOn     ■'''''■■     TEAR 


1922-1923. 


DUBLIN: 

HODGES,   -Fino T:s     \XTi   nn      >a    v^v^^^A^;   STREET, 


LONGMANS,    GKEKN,    AND    CO., 

LOHDOM,  UBW  yoUK,  AND  BOMBAY. 


THE   . 

DUBLIN  UNIVERSITY  CALENDAR 

FOE    THE    TEAR 

1922-1923. 


THE  PRESENT  MODE  OF  PUBLISHING  THE 
UNIVERSITY  CALENDAR. 

The  Calendar  consists  of  tlie  following  parts,  and  is  published 
at  the  following  dates  : — 

The  Dublin  University  Calendar  is  published  during 
the  Long  Vacation,  and  contains : — full  information  as  to  the 
Ordinary  and  Honor  Courses  in  Arts  and  in  the  Professional 
Schools,  the  results  of  Ordinary  and  Honor  Examinations  held 
in  Arts  and  in  the  Professional  Schools,  the  Degrees  conferred 
during  the  preceding  year,  tlie  additions  to  date  of  the  lists  in 
the  Special  Supplemental  Volume,  the  lists  of  the  Students  on 
the' College  Books,  the  Senate,  and  the  University  Electors  added 
during  the  preceding  year. 

A  Special  Supplemental  Volume  is  published  from  time 
to  time  as  the  Editor  of  the  Calendar  thinks  lit,  and  contains 
the  lists  of  Past  Prizemen  and  Exhibitioners  in  Arts,  and  in  the 
Professional  Schools,  of  Graduates  in  Honors,  of  Honorary 
Degrees,  of  Degrees  in  the  Professional  Schools,  of  Provosts, 
Fellows;  Scholars,  Professors,  Chancellors,  Vice- Chancellors,  and 
Representatives  in  Parliament,  and  of  the  Benefactors  of 
Trinity  College.  [  This  Volume  was  first  published  as  Vol.  II. 
in  1901,  and  was  republished  as  Vol.  III.  in  1906  and  in  1913.] 

The  ExAMiNATtON  Papers  as  set  are  arranged  as  follows  in 
15  Pamphlets,  which  are  sold  at  Is.  each : — (1)  Entrance,  Junior 
and  School  Exhibitions,  Sizarships,  Entrance  Prizes ;  (2)  Ordinary 
Freshman;  (3)  Ordinary  Sophister  and  Degree;  (4)  Divinity; 
(6)  Law;  (6)  Medical;  (7)  Engineering;  (8)  Music;  (9)  Honor 
Mathematics;  (10)  ftonor  Classics;  (11)  Honor  Philosophy; 
(12)  Honor  Experimental  and  Natural  Science;  (13)  Honor 
History  and  Political  Science;  (14)  Honor  Modern  Literature 
and  Celtic  ;  (15)  Hebrew  and  Oriental  Languages. 


J) 


THE    DUBLIN 


Wini^txsitu   CaUutrar, 


FOR    THE    YEAR 


1922-1923. 


DUBLIN: 

J^trnttli  at  i)jt  Sluiirtrsitj;  f^nu, 
HODGES,  FIGGIS,  AND  CO.,  20,  NASSAU  ST., 

PUHLISHBKS  TO  THB  UNIVERSITY. 

LONGMANS,    GREEN,    AND    CO., 

LONDON,  NEW  YOKK,  AND  BOMBAY. 
1922. 


in  2008  with  funding  from 
IVIicrosoft  Corporation 


littp://www.arcli  ive.org/details/calendar192223trinuoft 


CONTEiNTS. 


Days  of  Examinatiok,      .... 

Hoi' us  OF  Examination,    .... 

Days  of  Commencements,  .... 

Chapbi,,  Services  in,         .... 

Almanac,  ...... 

Officers  of  the  College  and  University,  . 
Mbmbeus  of  School  Committees, 
University  Council,  .... 

Divinity  School  Council. 

Literary,  Scientific,  and  other  Societies, 


Introduction  : — 

Constitution  of  the  University, 
Government, 

Teaching 

Conferring  of  Degrees, 

Terms  and  Exercises  ukquiued  fuk  ihk  sbvkkal  Dkuhees, 
Admission  of  Candidates  to  Degrees  "  in  Absentia," 
Admission  ad  eundem  Gradum,      .... 
Fees  paid  for  Degrees,  ..... 

Rbhkesentation  of  the  University  in  Tarliambnt, 

Trinity  College  : —  ' 

Order  of  Rank  in  the  College, 

College  Charges,  .... 

Residence,  and  duties  of  Resident  Students, 
Course  in  Arts: — 

Entrance,    .     "    . 

Entrance  Prizes, 

Sizarships,  .... 

Undergraduate  Course, 

Junior  Freshman  Year, 

Senior  Freshman  Year, 

Junior  Sophister  Year, 

Senior  Sophister  Year, 

Honors  and  Prizes, 

Catechetical  Course, 

Admission  of  Women  to  Degrees, 
Trinity  Hall, 

Admission  of  Kino's  Scholars, 

A  2 


VI  CONIKN1.S. 

Page 
Recognition  of  other  Universities: — 

Admission  of  Students  from  tho  Universities  of  Oxford  anu 

Cambridge, •         •         .79 

Recognition  of  Courses  kept  in  other  Universities,  .         .       80 

Arrangements  with  Magee  College,  Londonderry  .         .       ib. 

Recogi#tion  of  Arts  Studies  of  certain  Colonial  and  Indian 
Universities  and  Colleges,  ...         ...       81 

Terms  of  Admission  for  South  African  Students,  .         .         .82 
Exhibition  awarded  to  Graduates  in  Medicine  of  Melbourne 
University,        .........       8.5 

HoNOK  Courses,         ........        86-120 

moderatorships,      .         .......      121-146 

Lkctures  : — 

Lectures  in  the  Courses  in  Arts,    ......     147 

Miscellaneous  liBctures,         .......     149 

Public  Lectures,  .         .         .         .         •         •         •         .151 

Donnellan  Lectures, ib. 

EtEOTION  TO   FbLLOW.SHIFS  AND  ScilOLARSHll'S,'  .  .  .        152 

Studentships  and  Prizes  awarded  at  the  Degrbk  anu  Final 

Freshman  Examination,    ......  162 

Special  Prizes  : — 

Premitims  al  the  Examination  for  Fellowships,      .         .         .  164 

Prizes  in  Subjects  connected  with  the  study  of  Divinity,         .  165 
Prizes  in  Mathematics,         .         .         .         .         .         .         .168 

Prizes  in  Classics,         .         .         .                  .         •         •         '  ^^i 

Prize  in  Mental  and  Moral  Pliilosopiiy,  .         .         .         .175 

Prizes  in  Experimental  Science,             176 

Prizes  in  History  and  Political  Science,         ....  178 

Prizes  in  English,         ........  181 

Prizes  in  Oriental  Languages,       .         .         .         .         .         .182 

Prizes  in  Languages,              .......  183 

Miscellaneous  Prizes,             .         • 185 

ExHiKiTioNS  and  Special  Prizes  awarded  at  Entrance  ;  — 

Junior  Exhibitions  and  Senior  Exhibitions,   ....  186 

Erasmus  Smith  Exhibitions,          ......  190 

Special  Prizes, 191 

Exhibitions  awarded  without  examination,   ....  192 
Assistance  given  without  examination  to  Deserving  Students: — 

Assistance  given  by  the  Tutorial  Body,          ....  194 

The  Salmon  Fund, ib. 

The  Frederick  Purser  Graduates'  Fund,         .         .         .         .  ib. 

The  Frederick  Purser  Undergraduates'  Fund,         .         .         .  195 

Gold  Medallists'  War  Fund, 196 

SvMUARV  OF  Scholarships,  Exhibitions,  ani>  Phizes,       .         .  197 
Professional  Schools  : — 
I.  Divinity — 

General  Rules, 202 

Admission  to  the  Divinity  School,           ....  203 

Junior  Divinity  Year,            ......  204 

Senior  Divinity  Year,    .......  207 

Additional  Lectures,       . 210 

Prizes, 213 

Arrangements  for  1922-23, 227 


CONTBNTJs.  TS 

Pkofessional  Schools — continued : —  P«Be 

II.  Law — 

Regulations. 
Law  Premiums, 
Degrees  in  Law,    . 
Days  of  Examination,    . 

III.  Physic— 

Staff, 

"Winter  Session, 

Summer  Session, 

Degrees. 

Medical  Course  and  Fees, 

Higher  Degrees, 

Diploma  in  Gynaecology  and  Obstetrics 

Diploma  in  Public  Health, 

School  of  Dental  Science. 

Arts  Course  of  Medical  and  Dental  Students, 

Prizes, 

Museums, 

Herbarium  and  Botanic  Gardens, 

Sir  Patrick  Dun's  Hospital, 

Schools  and  Hospitals  recognized   by  the   Board  of 

Trinity  College,  Dublin, 
Recognition    by  the  University  of  other    Teaching 

Institutions, 
Dates  of  Examinations, 

IV.  Engineering — 

Staff, 

Regulations,   . 
License  and  Degrees, 
Fees,       .... 
Syllabus  of  Course, 
Alexander  Prize, 
Days  of  Examination,     . 


229 
232 
233 
238 


239 
241 
244 
245 
246 
265 
257 
267 
268 
266 
268 
273 
274 
275 

276 

277 
279 


281 
282 
285 
286 
287 
294 
295 


Indian  and  Home  Civil  Service  School : — 

University  Lectures  for  Selected  Candidates  for  the 

Civil  Service  of  India,  .... 

Classes  for  the  Indian,  Colonial,   and  Home  Civil 
Service  (Class  I.), 


VI.  School  of  Agriculture, 

VII.  School  of  Forestry,  ..... 

Examinations  fok  Qualifications  in  Education, 
Diploma  in  Economics  and  Cohmbrcial  Knowlroob, 
Diploma  for  Women  in  Rblioious  Knowlbuob, 
University  Appuintmkntb  Association, 


296 
297 
299 
302 
303 
304 
3)0 
313 


COWTKKTS. 


Library  of  Tkinity  Goli.boe,    .... 

Lending  Library, 

Lecky  Library,  ..... 

.iSTKONOMICAL  OBSERVATORY,    .... 

No&MAL  Climatological  Station,     . 
Buildings  of  Trinity  Golleos, 

Honors  and  Prizes  at  Entrance — 

High  Places  at  Entrance,       ...... 

Entrance  Prizes,     ........ 

Sizarship  Examination,  ...... 

Exhibitions  awarded  to  Students  from  South  Africa, 

Honor  and  Prize  Examinations,  Michaelmas  Teum,  1921 — 

Term  Prize  Examinations,      ...... 

Premiums  for  Composition  at  the  Term  Lectures, 
Catechetical  Premiums,  ...... 

Honor  and  Prize  Examinations,  Hilary  Term,  1922 — 

Term  Honor  Examinations,    ...... 

Premiums  for  Composition  at  the  Term  Lectures,    . 
Catechetical  Premiums,  ...... 

Honor  and  Prize  Examinations,  Trinity  Term,   1922 — 
Term  Honor  Examinations,    .... 
Premiums  for  Composition  at  the  Term  Lectures, 
Catechetical  Premiums,  .... 

Miscellaneous  Prizes  in  Arts, 

Final  Freshman  Examinations,        .... 

B.A.  Degree  Examinations, 

Prizes  ano  Examinations  in  the  School  of  Divinity, 
Examinations  in  the  School  of  Law,    . 
Examinations  in  the  School  of  Physic, 
Class  Lists  and  Degree  Examinations  in  the  School 
Engineering,      ....... 

School  of  Agricoltuke,  Edge  Exhibitions     . 

Diplomas  in  Education, 

Diplomas  in  Economics  and  Commercial  Knowledge, 
Degrees  Conferred  in  the  Year  1921-1922, 

Continuation  of  Lists  given  in  the  Special  Supplemental 
Volume  for  1921-22:— 

Auditors  of  the  Historical  Society,  .... 

Presidents  of  the  Philosophical  Society, 
Auditors  of  the  Theological  Society,       .... 
Suecessful  Candidates  at  the  Examination  for  the  Civil 
Service  of  India,  and  the  Home  Civil  Service  (Chiss  I), 


Page 
314 

319 
ib. 


320 
321 
322 


326 
ib. 

327 
ib. 


328 
332 
333 


ib. 

337 

ib. 


338 
341 
342 

343 
344 
346 
350 
3.53 
355 

371 
373 

ib. 

ib. 

374 


382 
ib. 
ib. 

34.3 


CONTENTS,  IX 

Page 
Continuation  of   Lists  given  in  the  Special  Supplemental 
Volume  for  1912-13 — continued: — 

Junior  and  School  Exhibitioners 384 

Senior  Exhibitioners, 388 

Prizemen  at  the  Degree  Examination,     .        .        •        .  390 

Fellowship  Prizemen, 393 

Prizemen  in — 

Subjects  connected  with  the  Study  of  Divinity,       .  393 

Mathematics, 394 

Classics, 396 

Mental  and  Moral  Philosophy,         ....  399 

Experimental  Science,     ......  399 

History  and  Political  Science,         ....  400 

English  and  Modern  Languages,      ....  401 

General  Answering 402 

Oriental  Languages, 402 

The  School  of  Divinity, 403 

The  School  of  Law, 404 

The  School  of  Physic, 406 

Special    Certificates  and   Prizemen   in    the   School  of 

Engineering, 408 

Graduates  in  Honors  at  the  B.A.  Degree  Examination,    .  411 

Honorary  Degrees, 424 

Doctors  in  Science, 426 

Bachelors  in  Science, 426 

Doctors  in  Literature,    . 427 

Divinity  Testimoniiims, 427 

Degrees  in  Divinity, 430 

Degrees  in  Law, 431 

Degrees,   Licenses,    and    Diplomas   in    Medicine  and 

Surgeiy,            433 

Degrees  and  Licenses  in  Dental  Science,         .        .        .  443 

Degrees  in  Engineering, 443 

Degrees  in  Agriculture,      - 445 

Professors  and  Lecturers  of  the  University,     .         ,        .446 

Benefactors  of  Trinity  College, 450 

Provosts, 462 

Fellows, 452 

Scholai-8, 453 

Present  Members  of  Trinity  Colleok,          ....  457 

Non-Matuioulateu  Students, 474 

Students  in  Medicine  not  on  the  Books  in  Arts,        .  475 

Entuances,  1921-22, 477 

Bachelors  in  Arts,  1921-1922, 481 

Sbnatus  Academicus, 484 

University  Electors  added,  1921-1922,         ....  493 

Index 606 


REFERENCE    TO    THE    PRINCIPAL   CHANGES    IN   THE 
COURSES  OF  STUDY  MADE  IN  THE  YEAR  1921-22. 


Page 
Entrance: — Irish, 31 

Sizarship  : — Natural  Science, 39 

Ordinary  Courses : — 

Irish  in  Freshman  years, 50-52 

Junior  Freshmen : — German,  Hilary  Ex. ;  French,  Michael- 


mas Ex., 

Senior  Freshmen  : — French,  Trinity  Ex., 
Junior  Sophisters : — Zoology, 
Senior  Sophisters  :  — Zoology, 


50 
51 
60 
67 


Honor  Courses : — 

Mathematics,      .........  87-91 

Botany  and  Zoology,  .         .        .         .         .         .         .       104,  105 

French — Junior  Freshman,  Hilary  and  Trinity  Exs.  j  Senior 

Freshman,  Hilary  and  Trinity  £xs.,        .       Ill,  112 

Junior  Sophisters,  Trinity  and  Michaelmas  Exs.,    .       116 


Courses  for  Moderatorships : — 

Mental  and  Moral  Philosophy, 

Natural  Science,  .        .         . 

History  and  Political  Science,  two  alternative  courses, 

Modern  Literature : — 

English, 

French,  Groups  II  and  III, 

Spanish,  Group  III, 

Oriental  Languages,  Classical  Tamil  added. 

Wall  Biblical  Scholarship,         .        .        . 


122-124 
125-128 
128-131 

131 
133 
138* 
145.J 

166, 


(    1*  ) 


Jags  of  f-i^nmination. 


Michaelmas  Term,  1922. 

B.A.    DEGUEK   EXAMINATION. 
Fiidiiy,  Saturday,  and  Monday,  December  15,  16,  and  18. 

FINAL  FRESHMAN   EXAMINATION. 

Thursday,  Friday,  and  Saturday,  October  19,  20,  and  21. 

TEKM    EXAMINATIONS. 
These  Examinations  last  two  days,  and  commence  as  stated  helow. 

Junior  Sophisters,  Monday,  October  16. 
Junior  Freshmen,  Thursday,  October  12. 

ENTKANCK   EXAMINATIONS. 
Autumn  Entrance,  Tuesday  and  Wednesday,  October  10  and  11. 
Supplemental  Entrance,  Friday  and  Saturday,  November  3  and  4. 

EXAMINATION   FOli   JUNIOU    AND   SCHOOL   EXHIBITIONS. 

Thursday,  Friday,  Saturday,  Monday,  and  Tuesday,  October  12,  13, 
14,  16,  and  17, 

CATECHETICAL  EXAMINATIONS. 

The    Catechetical   Examination    of  each  class  is  held  on  the  xceek-day 
following  the  Term  Examination. 

MODKRATOESHIP  EXAMINATIONS. 

Examinations    for   Moderatorships    last   four    days.     A  programme   is 
published  before  the  end  of  Trinity  Term. 


DAYS  OF  EXAMINATION. 


TEEM    PRIZE   AND   SPECIAL   PUIZE    KXAMINATIONS. 

Students  are  required  to  give  notice  (see  under  "Notice")  to 
the  Senior  Lecturer  of  their  intention  to  compete  at  any  of  the 
following  Term  Prize  or  Special  Prize  Examinations,  and  a 
})rogramme  will  be  published  before  the  end  of  Trinity  Terra .  They 
are  requested  to  state  also  at  the  same  time  whether  they  intend 
to  present  themselves  at  a  Term  Examination. 

Tertn  Prize  Examinations. 

Junior  Sophisters.  —  Mathematics,  Classics,  Mental  and  Moral 
Philosoph}',  Experimental  Science,  Natural  Science,  History  and 
Political  Science,  Modem  Literature,  Legal  and  Political  Science,  Celtic 
Languages. 

Senior  Freshmen.  —  Mathematics,  Classics,  Mental  and  Moral 
Philosophy,  Experimental  Science,  Natural  Science,  History,  English 
Literature,  French,  German,  Italian,  Old  and  Middle  Irish. 

Junior  Freshmen.  —  Mathematics,  Classics,  Mental  and  Moral 
Philosophy,  Experimental  Science,  Natural  Science,  History,  English 
Literature,  Frencli,  German,  Italian,  Old  and  Middle  Irish. 


Special  Prize  Examinations. 

Lloyd  Exhibition,  Bishop    Law's    Mathematical    Premiums,   Vice- 
Chancellor's  Latin  Medals,  Dunbar  Ingram. 


ENTUANCE   PRIZE    EXAMINATIONS. 

Greek  Prose,  Tuesday,  October  24. 

Greek  Verse,  Wednesday,  October  25. 

Latin  Prose,  Thursday,  October  26. 

Latin  Verse,  Friday,  October  27. 

English  Literature  and  Composition,  Saturday,  October  28. 

English  History  and  Modern  Geography,  Tuesday,  October  31. 

French,  Monday,  October  23. 

German,  Wednesday,  October  18. 

Hebrew,  Tuesday,  October  17. 

Experimental  Science,  Tuesday  and  Wednesday,  October  24  and  2o? 

Natural  Science,  Friday  and  Saturday,  October  20  and  21. 

Modern  Irish,  Thursday,  October  10. 

Scripture,  Monday,  October  30. 


EXAMINATIONS  IN  ARTS.  3* 

Hilary  Term,  1923. 

SUPPLEMENTAL  B.A.    DEGKEE  EXAMINATION. 
Wednesday,  Thursday,  and  Friday,  January  10,  11,  and  12. 

SUPPLEMENTAL   FINAL   FRESHMAN   EXAMINATION. 
Monday  and  Tuesday,  January  22  and  23. 

TERM   EXAMINATIONS. 
These  Examinations  last  two  days,  and  commence  as  slated  below. 
Senior  Sophisters,  Wednesday,  January  10. 
Junior  Sophisters,  Monday,  January  15. 
Senior  Freshmen,  Thursday,  January  18. 
Junior  Freshmen,  Friday,  January  26. 

ENTRANCE   EXAMINATION. 
Wednesday  and  Thursday,  January  24  and  25. 

CATECHETICAL   EXAMINATIONS. 

The   Catechetical  Examination   of  enek    class   is    held  on   the  week-day 
following  the  Term  Examination. 

TERM   HONOR  AND   SPECIAL   PRIZE  EXAMINATIONS. 

Students  are  required  to  give  notice  (see  tinder  "  ^otice  ")  to 
the  Senior  Lecturer  of  their  intention  to  compete  at  any  of  the 
following  Terra  Honor  or  Special  Prize  Examinations,  and  a 
programme  will  be  published  before  the  end  of  Michaelmas  Term. 
Thej'  are  requested  to  state  also  at  the  same  time  whether  they 
intend  to  present  themselves  at  a  Term  Examination. 

Term  Honor  Examinations. 

Senior  Sophisters.  —  Mathematics,  Classics,  Mental  and  Moral 
Philosophy,  Experimental  Science,  Natural  Science,  Legal  and  Political 
Science. 

Junior  Sophisters.  —  Mathematics,  Classics.  Mental  and  Moral 
Philosophy,  Experimental  Science,  Natural  Science,  History  and 
Political  Science,  Mo<iern  Literature,  liegal  and  Political  Science." 

Senior  Freshmen.  —  Mathematics,  Classics,  Mental  and  Moral 
Philosophy,  Experimental  Science,  History,  English  Literature, 
French,  German,  Italian,  Spanish. 

Junior  Freshmen. — Mathematics,  Classics,  Experimental  Science, 
History,  English  Literature,  French,  German,  Italian,  Spanish. 

Special  Prize  Examinations. 

M'Cullagh  Prize,  Berkeley  Medals,  Wray  Prize. 

b2 


DAYS  OP   EXAMINATION. 


Trinity  Term,  1923. 

Examinations  fou  Scholarships  commence  on  Monday,  April  30, 

STTPPLKMENTAL   B.A.    DEGREE   EXAMIKATION. 
Monday,  Tuesday,  and  Wednesday,  April  16,  17,  and  18. 

SPECIAL   B.A.    DEGUEE   EXAMINATION. 
Tuesday,  Wednesday,  and  Thursday,  June  19,  20,  and  21. 

SirPPLKMICNTAL   FINAL   FKESHMAN   EXAMINATION. 

Thursday  and  Friday,  April  26  and  27. 

TERM    EXAMINATIONS. 

These  Examinations  last  two  days,  and  commence  as  stated  below. 

Senior  Sophisters,  Monday,  April  16. 
Junior  Sophisters,  Monday,  April  23. 
Senior  Freshmen,  Thursday,  April  26. 
Junior  Freshmen,  Wednesday,  May  2. 

Junior  Freshmen  Supplementing  Hilary  Examination,  Thursday, 
June  28. 

CATECHETICAL   EXAMINATIONS. 

The  Catechetical  Examination   of  each  class  is  held   on    the   week-day 
following  the  Term  Examination. 

ENTRANCE   EXAMINATIONS. 

Supplemental  Entrance,  Monday  ami  Tuesday,  April  30  and  May  1. 
Midsummer  Entrance,  Tuesday  and  Wednesday,  June  26  and  27. 

EXAMINATION   FOR   SIZARSHIPS. 

Tuesday  and  Wednesday,  June  26  and  27. 

TERM   HONOR   AND   SPECIAL   PRIZE   EXAMINATIONS. 

Students  are  required  to  give  notice  (see  under  "Notice")  to 
the  Senior  Lecturer  of  their  intention  to  compete  at  any  of  the 
following  Term  Honor  or  Special  Prize  Kxaniinations,  and  a 
programme  will  be  published  before  the  end  of  Hilary  Terra.  They 
are  requested  to  state  also  at  tlie  same  time  whether  they  intend 
to  compete  for  Scholarship  or  present  themselves  at  a  Term 
Examination. 

Term  Honor  Examinations. 

Senior  Sophisters. — Mathematics,  Classics,  Experimental  Science, 
Natural  Science,  Legal  and  Political  Science.  _ 

Junior  Sophisters.  —  Mathematics,  Classics,  Mental  and  Moral 
Philosophy,  Experimental  Science,  Natural  Science,  History  and 
Political  Science,  Modern  Literature,  Legal  and  Political  Science. 


EXAMINATIONS   IN    ARIS.  <> 

Term  Honor  Examinations — continued. 

Senior  Freshmen.  —  Mathematics,  Classics,  Mental  and  Moral 
Philosophy,  Kxpetimental  Science,  History,  English  ] literature,  French, 
German,  Italian,  Spanish. 

Junior  Freshmen. — Mathematics,  Classics,  Experimental  Science, 
History,  English  Literature,  Frencli,  German,  Italian,  Spanish. 

Special  I'rize  Examinations. 

Wall  Biblical  Scholarship,  Ferrar  Memorial,  Ekenhead  Scholarship, 
Political  Economy,  Old  and  Middle  English,  Hebrew,  Chaldee,  Syriac, 
Arabic,  Persian,  Hindustani,  Sanskrit,  Irish,  Old  French  and  Proven<jal, 
Dompierre-Chaufepie.  ' 


Michaelmas  Term,  1923. 

B.A.    DKGKKE   KXAMINATION. 
Saturday,  ^londay,  and  Tuesday,  December  15,  17,  and  18. 

FINAL   FHESHMAN   KXAMINATION. 
Friday,  Saturday,  and  Monday,  October  19,  20,  and  22. 

TEEM   FAAMINATIONS. 

These  Examinations  last  two  days,  and  commence  as  stated  below. 
Junior  Sophisters,  Tuesday,  October  16. 
Junior  Freshmen,  Friday,  October  12. 

ENTKANCE  EXAMINATIONS. 

Autumn  Entrance,  Wednesday  and  Thursday,  October  10  and  11. 
Supplemental  Entrance,  Friday  and  Saturday,  November  2  and  3. 

EXAMINATION   FOU  JUNIOR   AND   SCHOOL  EXHIBITIONS. 

Friday,  Saturday,  Monday,  Tuesday,  and  Wednesday,  October  12,  13, 
15,  16,  and  17. 

CATECHETICAL   EXAMINATIONS. 

The   Catechetical   Examination  of  each   class   is   held  on  the  week-day 
follou-ing  the  Term  Examination. 

EXAMINATIONS   FOU   MODERATOKSHIP. 

Examinations  for  Moderatorships  last  four  days.     A  programme  is  pub- 
lished before  the  end  of  Trinity  Term. 


DAYS  OJ"  EXAMINATION. 


TERM   VHIZE    AND   SPECIAL   PRIZE   EXAMINATIONS. 

Students  are  required  to  give  notice  (see  under  "  Notice")  to 
the  Senior  Lecturer  of  their  intention  to  compete  at  any  of  the 
following  Terra  Prize  or  Special  Prize  Examinations,  and  a 
programme  will  be  published  before  tlie  end  of  Trinity  Term. 
They  are  requested  to  state  also  at  the  same  time  wiiether  they 
intend  to  present  themselves  at  a  Terra  Examination. 

Term  Prize  Examinationn. 

Junior  Sophisters.  —  Mathematics,  Classics,  Mental  and  Moral 
Philosophy,  Experimental  Science,  Natural  Science,  History  and 
Political  Science,  Modern  Literature,,  Legal  and  Political  Science, 
Celtic  Languages. 

Senior  Freshmen.  —  Mathematics,  Classics,  Mental  and  Moral 
Philosophy,  Experimental  Science,  Natural  Science,  History,  English 
Literature,  French,  (Jerman,  Italian,  Spanish,  Old  and  Middle  Irish. 

Junior  Freshmen.  —  Matticmatics,  Classics,  Mental  and  Moral 
Philosophy,  Experimental  Science,  Natural  Science,  History,  English 
Literature,  French,  Gernum,  Italian,  Spanish,  Old  and  Middle  Irisli. 

Special  Prize  Examinations . 

Lloyd  Exhibition,  Bishop  Law's  Mathematical  Premiums,  Vice- 
Chancellor's  Lp.tin  Medals,  Dunbar  Ingram. 


ENTRANCE  PRIZE  EXAMINATIONS. 

Greek  Prose,  Wednesday,  October  24. 

Greek  Verse,  Thursday,  October  25. 

lidtin  Prose,  Friday,  October  26. 

Latin  Verse,  Saturday,  October  27. 

Englisli  Literature  and  Composition,  Tuesday,  October  23. 

English  History  and  Modern  Geography,  Tuesday,  October  30. 

French,  "Wednesday,  October  31. 

German,  Thursday,  October  IS. 

Hebrew,  Wednesday,  October  17. 

Experimental  Science,  Wednesday  and  Thursday,  October  24  and  25. 

Natural  Science,  Saturday  and  Monday,  October  20  and  22. 

Modern  Irish,  Friday,  October  19. 

Scripture,  Monday,  October  29. 


KXAMINATIOXS  I-'OK  Sl'KCIAI,  I'UIZKS. 


Supplemental  List  of  Special  Prizes  in  Arts. 

Alice  Oldham  Memoviiil  Prize -Awarded  biennially  from  1910,  to 
women  students  from  Alexandra  College,  at  the  Junior  Sophister 
Prize  Examinations  in  Michaelmas  Term.  Next  competition  in 
1922. 

Biggs  Memorial  Prize — Awarded  at  the  Examination  for  Junior 
and  School  Exhibitions  to  Students  from  Chesterfield  Scliool, 
Birr,  or  Galway  Grammar  School,  or  Portora  Royal  School, 
Enniskillen. 

Blake  Scholarships — Essays  to  be  sent  in  on  or  before  November 
1st  every  fourth  j-ear.     Next  Competition,  November  1,  1924. 

Brooke  Prizes — Awarded   at   the   Moderatorship   Examination  in 

Classics  and  Mathematics. 

Charles  Wilkins  Memorial  Prize — Awarded  to  the  woman  who 
answers  best  in  Mathematics  at  the  Examination  for  Junior  and 
School  Exhibitions,  and  at  a  Specd.il  Examination  on  Thursday, 
Odtober  lit,  1922,  and  Friday,  October  19,  1923. 

Cluff  Memorial  Prize — Awarded  at  Junior  Sophister  Prize  Exami- 
nation in  Modern  History,  Michaelmas  Term. 

Dr.  Henry  Hutcliinson  Stewart  Scholarship  in  English  Literature 
— Awarded  on  the  results  of  the  Honor  Examinations  in  English, 
French,  German,  Italian,  and  Spanish  held  in  the  Junior 
Sophister  and  Senior  and  Junior  Freshman  years. 

Ekenhead  Scholarship — Every  third  year.  Next  Examination, 
in  1923  ;  see  p.  5*. 

Elrington  Theological  Prize — The  Essays  to  be  given  to  the 
Provost  or  Regius  Professor  of  Divinity  on  or  before  1st  Novem- 
ber in  each  year. 

Ferguson  Memorial  Prize — Awarded  every  third  year.  Next 
competition  in  192o.  Exercises  to  be  sent  to  the  Senior 
Lecturer  not  later  than  March  17. 

Fitz  Gerald  Memorial  Scholarship — Awarded  annually  on  sufficient 
merit  being  shown  by  the  candidate  in  his  experimental  work  and 
in  his  answering  in  the  Physical  part  of  the  examination  for 
Moderatorships  in  Experimental  Science. 

Haslett  Memorial  Scholarship— Awarded  at  the  Examination  for 
Junior  and  School  Exhibitions  to  students  from  St.  Andrew's 
College,  Dublin. 

Jellett  Prizes  for  General  Answering — Awarded  at  the  Final 
Freshman  Examination  held  at  the  beginning  of  Michaelmas 
Term. 


DAYS  OK  KXAMINATION. 
SUPPLEMENTAL  LIST  OF  SPECIAL  PHIZES  IN  AUT8 — Continued, 

Kidd  Scholarship — Every  fourth  year.     Next  Examination  in  1925. 

King  Edward  Prize — Awarded  annually  to  the  Respondent  who 
answers  best  in  the  M'hole  Course  required  at  the  Degree  Exami- 
nation in  December. 

Littledale  Prize — Awarded  at  the  Michaelmas  Senior  Freshman 
Prize  Examination  in  English  Literature. 

Madden  Prize — AM'arded  at  the  Fellowship  Examination. 

Marshall  Porter  Memorial  Prize — Awarded  at  the  Examination  for 
Scliolarshius  in  Classics. 

Michael  Roberts  Prize — Awarded  at  the  Senior  Freshman  Mathe- 
matical Prize  Examination,  Michaelmas  Teim. 

Modeiatorship  Prizes — Awarded  at  the  Degree  Examination. 

MuUins  Classical  Exhibition — Awarded  on  the  results  of  the  nine 
Honor  Examinations  in  Classics  in  the  Freshman  and  Junior 
Sophister  years. 

Townsend  Memorial  Prize — Awarded  on  the  results  of  the  Honor 
Examinations  in  Mathematics  in  the  Junior  Freshman  year. 

Tyrrell  Memorial  Prize — Compositions  to  be  sent  in  before  the  1st 
of  February  in  each  alternate  year.     Next  Competition  in  1924. 

Vice-Chancellor's  Prizes  for  Greek,  Latin,  and  English  Composi- 
tion— The  subjects  for  the  Vice-Chancellor's  Prizes  are  announced 
(by  a  notice  posted  on  the  gate)  on  or  before  June  1.  The  com- 
positions, with  fictitious  signatures,  must  be  sent  in  to  the  Senior 
Lecturer  on  or  before  December  1. 

Whately  Memorial  Prize  in  Political  Economy — Every  fifth  year. 
Next  competition  in  1922.  Essays  to  be  sent  in  on  or  before 
September  30. 

William  Roberts  Prize — Awarded  at  Senior  Freshman  Prize 
Examination  in  Classics,  Michaelmas  Term. 


For  the  dates  of  Examinations  in  the  Schools  of  Divinity,  Law, 
Physic,  and  Engineering,  see  ends  of  corresponding  sections. 


DEGRKKS   IN    MUSIC 


Degrees  in  Music. 


Wednesdaj',  June  20,  1923. 
Saturday,  December  15,  1923. 

[Note. — Practical  Test  on  the  preceding  week-day.] 


Examination  for  Diplomas  in  Education. 

Friday  and  Saturday,  October  27  and  28,  1922. 
Friday  and  Saturday,  April  20  and  21,  1923. 
Friday  and  Saturday,  October  26  and  27,  1923. 


Examination  for  Diploma  in  Economics  and  Commercial 
Knowledge. 

Tuesday,  Wednesdaj-,  Thursday,  and  Friday,  April  10,  11,  12,  and  13, 

1923. 


b3 


10*  HOURS   OF   EXAMINATIOK. 


Examinations  for  Entrance,  for  Junior  Exhibitions,  for  Sizar- 
ships,  Ordinary  Term  Examinations  (see  "  Course  in  Arts,"  §  15), 
Ordinary  Catechetical  Examinations,  Term  Honor  Examina- 
tions, and  Special  Prize  Examinations  commence  at  9.30  a.m. 

Entrance  Prize  Examinations  commence  at  10  a.m. 

For  Moderatorship,  Scholarship,  and  Fellowship  Examinations, 
the  hours  are  9.30  a.m.  to  12.30  p.m.,  and  2  p.m.  to  5  p.m. 

Honor  and  Prize  Catechetical  Kxaminations  commence  at  2  p.m. 


Jags  of  '§xx\f{it  €ommt\\tmtx\h  for  the  rontemuo 

Michaebnas  Term,  1922. 
Wednesday,  December  20,  at  2  o'clock. 

Hilary  Term,  1923. 
Tuesdaj',  February  13,  at  2  o'clock. 

Trinity  Term,  1923. 

Friday,  April  20,  at  2  o'clock. 
Saturday,  June  23,  at  2  o'clock. 

Michaelmas  T'erm,  1923. 
Thursday,  December  20,  at  2  o'clock. 


CHAl'KL  OK  TKINITV  COM.EGE.  Il* 


wx^d  of  l^nuitii  dollfgc. 


The  hours  of  Divine  Service  in  the  Chapel  of  Trinity  College  are 
as  follow: — 

Jforninf/  Sei'vice  :    10  o'clock  on  Sundays;    and  8.30  o'clock 
on  week-days. 

Evening  Service :  7  o'clock  on  Sundays  and  week-days. 

Huly  Comnumwn  :   on  Sundays  during  full  Term  at  8  a.m  and 
after  Morning  Prayer  on  Sundays  fixed  h\  the  Provost. 

The  Chapel  is  closed  during  vacations. 

Surplices  are   worn   on   Sundays   at   Morning    and   Evening 
Prayer.     Gowns  are  worn  at  other  times. 


:otoblc  gmin,  1924. 


Septiiagesima,  Febrwary  17 — Ash  Wednesday,  March  5. 
Easter  Day,  April  20 — Eogation  Sunday,  May  25. 
Ascension  Day,  May  2!> — Whit  Sunday,  June  8. 
Advent  Sunday,  November  30. 
Sundays  after  Epiphany,  5  ;   Sundays  after  Trinity,  23. 


§nWn  (Eiubersito  Almanac. 

FJIOM  OCTOBER  1,  1922,  TO  DECEMBER  31,  1923. 


EXPLANATION  OF  ALMANAC. 

The  Almanac  gives  the  days  on  which  the  various  Examinations 
commence. 

There  are  no  Tutorial  Lectures  in  Arts  on  days  marked 
thus  (t)  in  the  Almanac.  There  may,  however,  be  Professorial 
Lectures  in  the  Professional  Schools. 


1 

2 


M 


Tu 
W 
Th 
F 

S 


16th  Sunday  after  Trinity. 

Entiiince  Ex.  in  Arts  for  Medical  School. 

Winter  Session  Medical  School  begins.     Dissecting-rooms 

open.     Elementary  Instruction  in  Anatomy  begins. 
Preliminary  Scientific  Medical. 
Intermediate  Medical,  Part  I. 
Intermediate  Medical,  Part  II. 
Preliminary  Scientific  Dental. 
Intermediate  Dental. 

Special  Preliminary  Ex.  in  Arts  for  Medical  School. 


8 
9 

M 

10 

Tu 

11 

W  i 

12 

TiJ 

13 

P 

14 

Sa 

i 

17th  Siiniay  after  Trinity. 

Final  Medical,  Part  I. 

Diploma  in  Public  Healtli,  Part  I. 

Medical  Lectures  begin. 

Michaelmas  Term  begins. 

Autumn  Entrance. 

£x8.  for  Moderatorships  begin. 

Term  and  Special  Prize  Ezs.  begin. 

Civil  Law  Lectures  begin. 

B.A.I.  Degree. 

Engineering  Supplemental  Exs.,  Middle  and  Junior  Glasses. 

Feudal  and  English  Law  Lectures  begin. 

Diploma  for  Women  in  Religious  Knowledge. 

Term  Ex.,  Junior  Freshmen. 

Junior  and  School  Exhibitions. 

Constitutional  Law  Lectures  begin. 

Diploma  in  Public  Health,  Part  II. 

Engineering  School,  Supplemental  Entrajice. 

Jurisprudence  Lectures  begin. 

Engineering  Lectures  begin. 

Catechetical  Ex.,  Junior  Freshmen. 


19 


S    I    18th  Sunday  after  Trinity. 
M      Term  Ex.  Junior  Sophisters. 

Supplemental  Divinity  Ex.,  Junior  Class. 
Tu     Entrance  Prizes: — Hebrew. 

Supplemental  Divinity  Ex.,  Senior  Class. 
W      St.  Luke. 

Catechetical  Ex.,  Junior  Sophisters. 

Entrance  Prizes  : — German. 

Divinity  School  Entrance. 

Archbishop  King's  and  Bishop  Forster's  Divinity  Prizes. 
Th     Final  Freshman  Ex. 

Entrance  Prizes: — Modern  Irish. 

Charles  Wilkins  Memorial  Prize. 

Divinity  Lectures,  Junior  Class,  begin. 


IdSSs    QCT^Q'^'Ba^— continued. 


20 


21 


Sa 


Entrance  Prizes: — Natural  Science. 
Divinity  Lectures,  Senior  Class,  begin. 


22 

£ 

23 

M 

24 

Tu 

25 

W 

26 

Th 

27 

F 

28 


Sa 


19th  Sunday  after  Trinity. 

Entrance  Prizes: — French. 

Entrance  Prizes: — Greek  Prose  and  Experimental  Science. 

Entrance  Prizes  : — Greek  Verse. 

Entrance  Prizes: — Latin  Prose. 

Entrance  Prizes  : — Latin  Verse. 

Ex.  for  Diplomas  in  Education. 

St.  Simon  and  St.  Jude. 

Entrance  Prizes :  — English  Literature. 


29 
30 
31 


S 
M 
Tu 


20th  Sunday  after  Trinity. 

Entrance  Prizes  : — Scripture. 

Entrance  Prizes  : — English  History  and  Modern  Geography, 


All  Saints. 


W 

Th  j 

F     I  Entrance. 

Sa   I 


9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 


M 

Tu 
W 

Th 

F 

Sa 

S 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

F 

Sa 


Slst  Sunday  after  Trinity. 
Undergraduate  Lectures  in  Arts  begin. 

Catechetical  Lectures  begin. 
Meeting  of  the  University  Council. 


22nd  Sunday  after  Trinity. 

Meeting  of  the  Divinity  School  Council. 


19 

S 

20 

M 

21 

Tu 

22 

W 

23 

Th 

24 

F 

25 

Sa 

23rd  Sunday  after  Trinity. 


Term  Ex.  Feudal  and  English  Law. 
Term  Ex.  Constitutional  Law. 
Term  Ex.  Civil  Law. 


Sunday  next  before  Advent. 

Term  Ex.  Jurisprudence. 

Final  Medical,  Part  II.,  Surgery.     M.Ch.  Degree  Ex. 

Final  Medical,  Part  II.,  Midwifery.     M.A.O.  Degree  Ex. 

B.  Dent.  Sc.  and  M.  Dent.  Sc.  Degrees  Ex. 


St.  Andrew. 

Last  day  for  giving  notice  of  intention  to  compete  at  Honor 
and  Prize  Exs.  ia  Hilary  Term  (see  p.  3*). 


I3i3!3s   i>e:ce:im:^e:xs. 


2G 

S 

27 

M 

28 

Tu 

29 

W 

30 

Th 

1 

F 

2 

Sa 

3 

3 

4 

M 

5 

Tu 

6 

W 

7 

Th 

8 

F 

9 

Sa 

10 

S 

U 

M 

1st  Sunday  in  Advent. 

Final  Medical,  Part  II.,  Medicine. 

B.D.  Degree  Ex. 

Intermediate  Ex.  in  Law. 

LL.B.  and  LL.D.  Degrees  Exs. 


Catechetical  Lectures  end. 


12  Tu 

13  I  "W 
U  Th 

15  F 

16  Sa 


2nd  Sunday  in  Advent. 
Divinity  Lectures,  Junior  Class,  end. 
Divinity  Lectures,  Senior  Class,  end. 
Supplemental  Divinity  Ex.,  Junior  Class. 
Supplemental  Divinity  Ex.,  Senior  Class. 
Meeting  of  the  University  Council. 
Undergraduate  Lectures  in  Arts  end. 
Engineering  Lectures  end. 
B.A.  Degree  Ex. 


17 

» 

18 

M 

19 

Tu 

20 

W 

21 

Th 

22 

F 

23 

Sa 

Srd  Sunday  in  Advent.     Ember  Week. 

Catechetical  Ex.,  Candidate  Bachelors. 
Theses  for  M.D.  Degree. 
Winter  Commencements. 
Michaelmas  Term  ends. 
St.  Thomas. 


24 

S 

25 

M 

26 

Tu 

27 

W 

28 

Th 

29 

F 

30 

Sa 

31 

a 

Uh  Sunday  in  Advent, 
Christmas  Day. 
St.  Stephen. 
St.  John. 
Innocents'  Bay. 


X923,     JA.IfXJA.RY'. 


1 

M 

2 

Tu 

3 

W 

4 

Th 

5 

F 

6 

Sa 

Circumcision. 


Epiphany. 


9 
10 


13 


S 
M 
Tu 
W 


Th 
F 

Sa 


1st  Sunday  after  Epiphany. 


35lilary  Term  begins. 

Term  Ex.  Senior  Sophisters. 

Supplemental  B.A.  Degree  Ex. 

Honor  and  Prize  Exs.  begin. 

Feudal  and  English  Law  Lectures  begin. 

Engineering  Lectures  begin. 

Diploma  for  Women  in  Religions  Knowled 

Criminal  Law  Lectures  begin. 

Civil  Law  Lectures  begin. 

International  Law  Lectures  begin . 

Catechetical  Ex.  Senior  Sophisters. 


14 

S 

15 

M 

16 

Tu 

17 

W 

18 

Th 

19 

F 

20 

Sa 

2nd  Sunday  after  Epiphany. 
Term  Ex.  Junior  Sophisters. 

Catechetical  Ex.  Junior  Sophisters. 
Term  Ex.  Senior  Freshmen. 
Meeting  of  the  Divinity  School  Council. 
Divinity  Lectures,  Senior  Class,  begin. 
Catechetical  Ex.  Senior  Freshmen. 
Divinity  School  Entrance. 


21 

s, 

22 

M 

23 

Tu 

24 

W 

25 

Th 

26 

F 

27 

Sa 

3rd  Sunday  after  Epiphany. 
Final  Freshman  Supplemental  Ex. 
Divinity  Lectures,  Junior  Class,  begin. 

Entrance. 

Conversion  of  St.  Paul. 

Term  Ex.  Junior  Freshmen. 


28 
29 
30 
31 


% 
M 
Tu 
W 


Septuagesima. 

Catechetical  Ex.  Junior  Freshmen. 


X823,     FEBRUA-XSY^. 


1 

Th 

2 

F 

3 

Sa 

18 
19 
20 
21 
22 

23 
24 


Undergraduate  Lectures  in  Arts  begin. 
Purification  of  B.  V.  M. 
Catechetical  Lectures  begin. 


S 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

F 

Sa 


Sexagesima. 


Meeting  of  the  University  Council. 


11 

s 

12 

M 

13 

tTu 

14 

tw 

15 

Th 

IG 

F 

17 

Sa 

Qumquagesxma. 

Theses  for  M.D.  Degree. 

Shrove- Tuesday . 

Spring  Commencements. 

Ash-  Wednesday . 


S 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

F 

Sa 


1st  Sunday  in  Lent.     Quadragesima.     Ember  Week. 

Carson  Biblical,  and  Toplady  Memorial  Scripture  Prizes. 

Term  Ex.  Criminal  Law. 

Meeting  of  the  Divinity  School  Council. 

St.  Matthias. 

Term  Ex.  Feudal  and  English  Law. 


25 
26 
27 

28 


S 
M 
Tu 
W 


2nd  Sunday  in  Lent. 

Term  Ex.  Civil  Law. 

Term  Ex.  International  Law. 

Meeting  of  the  University  Council. 


X923,    IVIAXtCH. 


1 

Th 

2 

F 

3 

Sa 

4 

c 

5 

M 

6 

Tu 

7 

W 

8 

Th 

9 

F 

10 

Sa 

Last  day  for  giving  notice  of  intention  to  compete  at  Honor 
and  Prize  Exs.  in  Trinity  Term  (see  p.  4*). 


Srd  Sunday  in  Lent. 

Preliminary  Scientific.  Medical  (Botany  and  Zoology). 

Intermediate  Medical,  Part  I. 

Final  Medical,  Part  II.,  Medicine. 

Diploma  in  Public  Health,  Part  I. 

Intermediate  Dental. 

B.D.  Degree  Ex.     Theological  Exhibitions, 

Diploma  in  Public  Health,  Part  II. 

Catechetical  Lectures  end. 

Medical  School  Winter  Session  ends. 

Meeting  of  the  Senate  for  nomination  to  Honorary  Degrees. 


13 
14 
15 
16 


M 


Tu 
W 
Th 


17   i  Sa 


Jt-th  Sunday  in  Lent. 

Preliminary  Scientific  Medical  (Physics  and  Chemistry). 

Intermediate  Medical,  Part  II. 

Final  Medical,  Part  1. 

Final  Medical,  Part  II.,  Surgery.     M.Ch.  Degree  Ex. 

Prelitninary  Scientific  Dental  (Physics  and  Chemistry). 

B.  Dent.  Sc.  and  M.  Dent.  Sc.  Degree  Exs. 

Divinity  Lectures,  Senior  Class,  end. 

Supplemental  Divinity  Ex.,  Senior  Class. 

Divinity  Lectures,  Junior  Class,  end. 

Undergraduate  Lectures  in  Arts  end. 

Supplemental  Divinity  Ex.,  Junior  Class. 

Engineering  Lectures  end. 

St.  Fatriclc. 


18 
19 


25 

26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 


M 


20 

Tu 

21 

W 

22 

Th 

23 

F 

24 

Sa 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

F 

Sa 


5lh  Sunday  in  Lent. 

Entrance  Ex.  in  Arts  for  Medical  School. 

Final  Medical,  Part  II.,  Midwifery.     M.A.O.  Degree  Ex. 

Special  Preliminary  Ex.  in  Arts  for  Medical  School. 


Sunday  next  before  Easter.     Annunciation  B.  V.  M. 
.^tlarg  Term  ends. 


X923, 

1 

S 

2 

M 

3 

Tu 

4 

W 

0 

Th 

6 

F 

7 

Sa 

Ji^^nXJ^. 


EASTER  BAY. 

Monday  in  Easter  Week. 
Tuesday  in  Easter  Week. 


M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

F 

Sa 


1st  Sunday  after  Easter. 

Medical  Suliool  Summer  Session  begins. 

Ex.  for  Diplomas  in  Economics  and  Commercial  Knowledge. 


15 

5 

16 

M 

17 

Tu 

18 

W 

19 

Th 

•20 

F 

21 

Sa 

22 
23 
24 
25 


27 

28 


M 

Tu 

W 


26      Th 


F 

Sa 


2nd  Sunday  after  Easter. 

Trinity  Ternr  begins. 

Term  Ex.  Senior  Sophisters. 

Supplemental  B.A.  Degree  £z. 

Honor  and  Prize  £xs.  begin. 

Law  of  Evidence  Lectures  begin. 

Civil  Law  Lectures  begin. 

Lectures  in  International  Law  begin. 

Divinity  School  Entrance. 

Feudal  and  English  Law  Lectures  begin. 

Diploma  for  Women  in  Religious  Knowledge. 

Catechetical  Ex.  Senior  Sophisters. 

Divinity  Lectures,  Junior  Class,  begin. 

Theses  for  M.D.  Degree. 

First  Trinity  Commencements. 

Divinity  Lectures,  Senior  Class,  begin. 

Examination  for  Diplomas  in  Education. 


3rd  Sunday  after  Easter. 
Term  Ex.  Junior  Sophisters. 

St.  Mark. 

Catechetical  Ex.  Junior  Sophisters. 

B.A.I.  Degree  Ex. 

Engineering  Exs.  Middle  and  Junior  Classes. 

Term  Ex.  Senior  Freshmen. 

Supplemental  Final  Freshman  £z. 

Catechetical  Ex.  Senior  Freshmen. 


M 


Uth  Sunday  after  Easter, 

Entrance. 

Exs.  for  Scholarships. 

Engineering  Lectures  begin. 


19S3,     IVKAY. 


1 

Tu 

2 

W 

3 

Th 

4 

F 

5 

Sa 

6 

S 

7 

M 

8 

Tu 

9 

W 

10 

Th 

11 

F 

12 

Sa 

St.  Fhihp  and  St.  James. 
Term  Ex.  Junior  Freshmen. 

Catechetical  Ex.  Junior  Freshmen. 


13 

S 

14 

M 

15 

Tu 

16 

W 

17 

Th 

18 

F 

19 

Sa 

5th  Sunday  afterEaster. — Rogation  Sunday. 
Undergraduate  Lectures  in  Arts  begin 

Catechetical  Lectures  begin. 
Downes'  Piizes  for  Written  Essays. 
Meeting  of  the  University  Council. 
Ascension  Day. 


Snuday  after  Ascension  Day. 


Downes'  Prizes  for  Extempore  Speaking. 
Meeting  of  the  Divinity  School  Council. 


20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 


fM 
T.i 
W 
Th 
F 
Sa 


Whit  Sunday.     Ember  Week. 

Monday  in  JVhitsun-Week. 

T'uesday  in  Whitsun-  Week. 

DoM'nes'  Prizes  for  Reading  the  Liturgy  (Written  Ex.). 


27  S 

28  [tM 

29  Tu 

30  W 


31  !  Th 


TRINITY  SUNDAY. 
Election  of  Scholars. 

Downes'  Prizes  for  Eeading  the  Liturgy  (Viva-voce  Ex. 

Annual  Ex.  Feudal  and  English  Law. 

Meeting  of  tlie  University  Council. 

Annual  Ex.  Constitutional  and  Criminal  Law. 


19S3,   JUJWE. 


1 


F 

Sa 


Annual  Ex.  Civil  Law. 
Annual  Ex.  International  Law 
Kyle  Irish  Prize. 


1st  Sunday  after  Trinity. 

Final  Medical,  Part  II.,  Surgery.     M.Ch.  Degree  Ex. 
Final  Medical,  Part  II.,  Midwifery.     M.A.O,  Degree  Ex. 
B.  Dent.  Sc.  and  M.  Dent.  Sc.  Degree  Exs. 


19 

23, 

5 

Tu 

6 

W 

7 

Th 

8 

F 

9 

Sa 

J  XJ  U  EI  — co>t  tin  ued. 
Last  day  for  giving  notice  of  intention  to  compete  at  Honor 

and  Prize  Exs.  in  Michaelmas  Term  (see  p.  6*). 
B.D.  Degree  Ex. 
Intermediate  Ex.  in  Law. 
LL.B.  and  LL.D.  Degrees  Exs. 


12 


9 
M 

Tu 


W 

Th 

F 

Sa 


2nd  Sunday  after  Trinity. 

St.  Barnabas.     Final  Medical,  Part  II. 

Medical  Travelling  Prize. 

Divinity  Lectures,  Senior  Class,  end. 

Engineering  Lectures  end. 

B.A.I.  Degree  Ex.     (In  part.) 

Final  Divinity  Ex.,  Senior  Class. 

Divinity  Lectures,  Junior  Class,  end. 

Bedell  Irish  Scholarship. 

General  Divinity  Ex.,  Junior  Class. 

Catechetical  Lectures  end. 


Medicine. 


19 


22 


23 


Tu 


Sa 


3rd  Sunday  after  Trinity. 
Preliminary  Scientific  Medical. 
Intermediate  Medical,  Part  I. 
Final  Medical,  Part  I. 

Diploma  in  Public  Health,  Part  I.  [Zoology. 

Medical  Scholarship, Physics,  Chemistry, Botany,  and 
Medical  Scholarship,  Anatomy  and  Institutes  of  Medicine. 
Preliminary  Scientific  Dental. 
Intermediate  Dental. 
TTndergradaate  Lectures  in  Arts  end. 
Special  B.A.  Degree  Ex. 
Piactical  Test  for  Mus.  B.  Degree. 
Mus.  B.  and  Mus.  D.  Degree  Exs. 
Diploma  in  Public  Health,  Part  II. 
Meeting  of  the  Divinity  School  Council. 
Catechetical  Ex.,  Candidate  Bachelors. 
Theses  for  M.D.  Degree. 
Engineering  Exs.,  Middle  and  Junior  Classes. 
Summer  Commencements. 


24 
25 
26 

27 
28 

20 
30 


M 
Tu 

W 

Th 

F 

Sa 


Jfth  Sunday  after  Trinity.     St.  John  Baptist, 
Intermediate  Medical,  Part  II. 
Midsummer  Entrance. 
Sizar  ship. 

Supplemental  Hilary  Ex.,  Junior  Freshmen. 

Engineering  School  Entrance. 

St.  Teter. 

Triniti}  Tpnn  pnds. 

Medical  School  Summer  Session  ends. 


1823, 

axjr^^sr. 

1 

g 

5ih  Sunday  after  Trinity. 

2 

i\ 

3 

Tu 

4 

W 

5 

Th 

6 

F 

7 

Sa 

8 

5 

6th  Sunday  of ter  Trinity . 

9 

M 

Library  closed. 

10 

Tu 

11 

W 

12 

Th 

13 

F 

14 

Sa 

15 

ft 

7th  Sunday  after  Trinity. 

16 

M 

17 

Tu 

18 

W 

19 

Th 

20 

F 

21 

Sa 

22 

ft 

8th  Sunday  after  Trinity. 

23 

M 

Library  re-opened. 

24 

Tu 

25 

W 

St.  James. 

26 

Th 

27 

F 

28 

Sa 

29 

ft 

9th  Sunday  after  Trinity. 

30 

M 

31 

Tu 

1923, 

AXTGUsrr. 

1 

W 

2 

Th 

3 

F 

! 

4 

Sa 

t 

5 

ft 

lOth  Sunday  after  I'rinity. 

6 

M 

Tramfguration. 

7 

Tu 

8 

W 

9 

Th 

10 

F 

11 

Sa 

j 

12 

ft 

11th  Sunday  after  Trinity. 

13 

M 

14 

Tu 

15  !  W 

X923,     R.XJGXJ  SI?— couh'nued. 


16 
17 
18 


Thl 
F  1 
Sa 


S       12th  Stmday  after  Trinity. 


19 

a 

20 

M 

21 

Tu 

22 

W 

23 

Th 

24 

F 

25 

Sa 

26 

S 

27 

M 

28 

Tu 

29 

W 

30 

Th 

31 

F 

St.  Bartholomew. 


13th  Sunday  after  Trinity. 


1923,    se:p'X'e:]vi^e:jr. 


Sa 


M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

F 

Sa 


l!fth  Sunday  after  Trinity. 


S 

M 

Tu 

W 

Til 

F 

Sa 


15th  Sunday  after  Trinity. 


M 
Tu: 

Thi 

F    i 
S 


16th  Sunday  ufter  Trinity,     Ember  Week. 


St.  Matthew. 


23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 


M 

Tu 
W 

Th 
F 

S^ 

% 


17th  Sunday  after  Trinity. 


St.  Michael  and  All  Angels. 


18th  Sunday  after  Trinity. 


X923, 

ocrroBE:xc. 

1 

M 

Entrance  Ex.  in  Arts  for  Medical  School. 

Winter  Session  Medical  School  begins.     Dissecting-rooms 

open.     Elementary  Instruction  in  Anatomy  begins. 
Preliminary  Scientific  Medical. 
Intermediate  Medical,  Part  I. 
Intermediate  Medical,  Part  II. 
Preliminary  Scientific  Dental. 

1^ 

Tu 
W 

Intermediate  Dental. 

3 

Special  Preliminary  Ex.  in  Arts  for  Medical  School.              \ 

4 

Th 

5 

F 

6 

Sa 

7 

« 

19th  Sunday  after  Trinity. 

8 

M 

Final  Medical,  Part  I. 

Diploma  in  Public  Health,  Part  I. 

Medical  Lectures  begin. 

9 

Tu 

10 

W 

Michaelmas  Term  begins. 

Autumn  Entrance 

£xs.  for  Mod«ratorsMps  begin. 

Term  and  Special  Prize  Szs.  begin. 

Feudal  and  English  Law  Lectures  begin. 

B.A.I.  Degree. 

Engineering  Supplemental  Exs.,  Middle  and  Junior  Classes. 

Diploma  for  Women  in  Religious  KnoM'ledge. 

11 

Th 

Constitutional  Law  liCctures  begin. 
Diploma  in  Public  Health,  Part  II. 

12 

F 

Term  Ex.,  Junior  Freshmen. 
Junior  and  School  Exhibitions. 

Jurisprudence  Lectures  begin.                                               ^ 

Civil  Law  Lectures  begin. 

Engineering  School,  Supplemental  Entrance. 

13 

Sa 

Entrance  Prizes: — Natural  Science. 

14 

5 

20th  Sunday  after  I'rinity. 

15 

M 

Catechetical  Ex.,  Junior  Freshmen. 

Supplemental  Divinity  Ex.,  Junior  Class. 

Engineering  Lectures  begin. 

16 

Tu 

Term  Ex.,  Junior  Sophisters. 

Supplemental  Divinity  Ex.,  Senior  Class. 

17 

W 

Entrance  Prizes : — Hebrew. 

Divinity  School  Entrance. 

Archbishop  King's  and  Bishop  Forster's  Divinity  Prizes. 

18 

] 

Th 

St.  Luke. 

Catechetical  Ex.,  Junior  Sophisters. 

Entrance  Prizes:— German. 

Divinity  Lectures,  Junior  Class,  begin. 

1 

; 

X923, 

OaVO^lEJ^—conftnued. 

19 

F 

Final  Freshman  £z. 
Entrance  Prizes:— Modern  Irish. 
Charles  Wilkins  Memorial  Prize. 
Divinity  Lectures,  Senior  Class,  begin. 

20 

Sa 

Entrance  Prizes : — Natural  Science. 

21 

S 

Slsl  Sunday  after  Trinity. 

22 

M 

23 

Tu 

Catechetical  Ex.,  Senior  Freshmen. 
Entrance  Prizes: — English  Literature. 

24 

W 

Entrance  Prizes  :— Greek  Prose  and  Experimental  Science. 

25 

Th 

Entrance  Prizes  : — Greek  Verse. 

26 

P 

Entrance  Prizes  : — Latin  Prose. 
Ex.  for  Diplomas  in  Education. 

27 

Sa 

Entrance  Prizes  : — Latin  Verse. 

28 

S 

22nd  Sunday  after  Trinity.     St.  Simon  and  St.  Jude. 

29 

M 

Entrance  Prizes :— Scripture. 

30 

Tu 

Entrance  Prizes  :— English  History  and  Modem  Geograpliy. 

31 

W 

Entrance  Prizes  :— French, 

X8 

23, 

nove:]M[J3e:r. 

1 

Th 

All  Sainti. 

2 

F 

Entrance. 

3 

Sa 

4 

S 

23rd  Sunday  after  Trinity. 

5 

M 

Undergraduate  Lectures  in  Arts  begin. 

6 

Tu 

7 

W 

Catechetical  Lectures  begin. 
Meeting  of  the  University  Council. 

8 

Th 

9 

F 

10 

Sa 

11 

S 

2!i-th  Sunday  after  Trinity. 

12 

M 

13 

Tu 

Meeting  of  the  Divinity  School  Council. 

14 

W 

15 

Th 

16 

F 

17 

Sa 

18 

% 

25th  Sunday  after  Trinity. 

19 

M 

20 

Tu 

21 

W 

Term  Ex.  Feudal  and  English  Law. 

22 

Th 

Term  Ex.  Constitutional  Law. 

23 

F 

Term  Ex.  Civil  Law. 

24 

Sa 

C 

1023. 

M'O'VE:  JM.'^aTEl'Bi— continued. 

25 

S 

Sunday  next  before  Advent. 

26 

M 

Term  Ex.  Jurisprudence. 

Final  Medical,  Part  II.,  Surgery.     M.Ch.  Degree  Ex. 
Final  Medical,  Part  II.,  Midwifery.     M.A.O.  Degree  Ex. 
B.  Dent.  Sc.  and  M.  Dent.  Sc.  Degrees  Ex. 

27 

Th 

28 

W 

29 

Th 

30 

F 

St.  Andrew. 

Last  day  for  giving  notice  of  intention  to  compete  at  Honor 
and  Prize  Exs.  in  Hilary  Term  (see  p.  3*). 

1923, 

i3e:  ce:  IMS  ]be:  IE. 

1 

Sa 

2 

S 

1st  Sunday  in  Advent. 

3 

M 

Final  Medical,  Part  II.,  Medicine. 

4 

Tu 

B.D.  Degree  Ex. 
Intel-mediate  Ex.  in  Law. 
LL.B.  and  LL.D.  Degrees  Ex. 

5 

W 

6 

Th 

7 

F 

8 

Sa 

Catechetical  Lectures  end. 

9 

S 

3nd  Sunday  in  Advent. 

10 

M 

Divinity  Lectures,  Junior  Class,  end. 

11 

Tu 

Divinity  Lectures,  Senior  Class,  end. 
Supplemental  Divinity  Ex.,  Junior  Class. 

12 

W 

Supplemental  Divinity  Ex. ,  Senior  Class. 
Meeting  of  the  University  Council . 

13 

Th 

14 

F 

TTndergradaate  Lectares  in  Arts  end. 

Engineering  Lectures  end. 
Practical  Test  for  Mus.B.  Degree. 

15 

Sa 

B.A.  Degree  Ex. 

Mus.B.  and  Mus.D.  Degrees  Exs. 

16 

S 

3rd  Sunday  in  Advent.     Umber  Week. 

17 

M 

18 

Tu 

19 

W 

Catechetical  Ex.,  Candidate  Bachelors. 
Theses  for  M.D.  Degree. 

20 

Th 

Winter  Commencements. 

Michaelmas  Term  ends. 

21 

F 

St.  Thomas. 

22 

Sa 

23 

S 

kth  Sunday  in  Advent. 

24 

M 

25 

Tu 

Christmas  Day. 

26 

W 

St.  Stephen. 

27 

Th 

St.  John. 

28 

F 

Innocents'  Bay. 

29 

S 

30 

% 

Sunday  after  Christmas. 

31 

M 

OF  THE 

July  1,  1922.  ^ 


Chaticellor. 
The  Earl  of  Iveagh,  K.P.,  LL.D. 

Vice-  Chaficellor . 
The  Right  Hon.  Baron  Glenavy,  LL.D. 

Visitors. 

The  Chancellor  (or  in  his  absence  the  Vice- Chancellor). 
The  Lord  Chief  Justice. 

Pl'OVOSt. 

The  Eight  Hon.  and  Most  Rev.  John  Henry  Bernard,  D.D. 

Senior  Fellows. 

Thomas  Thompson  Gray,  M.A.,  Viee-Frovost. 

George  Lambert  Cathcart,  M.A.,  Auditor. 

Louis  Claude  Purser,  M.A.,  Litt.D.,  Registrar. 

William  Ralph  Westropp  Roberts,  D.D.,  Senior  Lecturer . 

Edward  Parnall  Culverwell,  M.A.,  Senior  Lean  and  Calechist. 

Alexander  Charles  O'Suilivan,  M.A.,  M.D. 

Robert  Russell,  M.A.,  Bursar. 

Junior  Fellows. 

[Thoae  marked  thus  (*)  are  Tutor  Fellows.] 

Matthew  Wyatt  Joseph  Fry,  M.A.,  Senior  Froctor. 
Henry  Stewart  Macran,  M.A. 
Edward  John  Gwynn,  M.A. 
William  Edward  Thrift,  M.A. 
Josiah  Gilbart  Smyly,  Litt.D. 
c2 


28*  UNIVEESIXr   AND   COLLEGE   OFFICERS, 

George  William  Mooney,  M.A. 
•William  Kennedy,  M.A. 
•Reginald  Arthur  Percy  Eogers,  M.A. 
•William  Alexander  Goligher,  M.A.,  Litt.D. 
•John  Fraser,  M.A. 
•Ernest  Henry  Alton,  M.A. 
•Robert  Malcolm  Gwynn,  B.D. 

George  Randolph  Webb,  M.  A.,  Junior  Bursar  and  Reyis- 
Irar  of  Chambers. 
•Sir  Robert  William  Tate,  M.A.,  K.B.E.,  Junior  Bean. 
•Harry  Thrift,  M.A. 
•Hugh  Canning,  M.A. 
*Arthur  Aston  Luce,  D.D. 
^Joseph  Johnston,  M.A. 
*James  Maxwell  Henry,  M.A. 
^Francis  LaTouche  Godfrey,  M.A. 

John  Joly,  Sc.D. 

Charles  Henry  Rowe,  M.A.,  Junior  Proctor. 

William  Robert  Fearon,  Sc.D. 


Representatives  of  the  Junior  Fellows  on  the  Board, 

William  Edward  Thrift,  M.A. 
William  Alexander  Goligher,  Litt.D. 


Reiyresentatives  of  the  Professors  on  the  Board. 

Sydney  Young,  Sc.D. 
Harold  Pringle,  M.D. 


Representatives  of  the  University  in  Parliament. 

Elected 

Robert  Henry  Woods,  M.Ch., 1918 

William  Morgan  Jellett,  B.A., 1919 


Honor  Examiners  for  the  Year  1923. 
In  Mathematics. 

The  University  Professor  of  Natural  Philosophy. 

C.  H.  Rowe,  M.A.  (Acting  Professor  of  MathematicB). 

G.  R.  Webb,  M.A. 

J.  M.  Henry,  M.A. 


DNIVKKSITY  AND  COLI.EO  K  OKKICKKS,  2 

In  Glassies, 

The  Regius  Professor  of  Greek, 
The  Professor  of  Latin, 
W.  Kennedy,  M.A. 
W,  A.  Goligher,  Litt.D, 
E,  H.  Alton,  M.A. 

In  Mental  and  Moral  Fhilosophrf. 

H.  S.  Macran,  M.A. 
R.  A.  P.  Rogers,  M.A. 
A.  A,  Luce,  D,D. 

In  Experimental  Science. 

The  University  Professor  of  Chemistry. 
Erasmus  Smith's  Professor  of  Natural  and  Experi- 
mental Philosophy, 
Professor  of  Applied  Chemistry. 
H.  Thrift,  M,A, 

In  Natural  Science. 

The  Professor  of  Zoology  and  Comparative  Anatomy, 

The  University  Professor  of  Botany. 

The  Professor  of  Geology  and  Mineralogy, 

In  History  and  Political  Science. 

The  Lecky  Professor  of  Modern  History. 
Erasmus  Smith's  Professor  of  Modern  History. 
The  Professor  of  Political  Economy. 

In  Modern  Literature, 

The  Professor  of  English  Literature. 
The  Professor  of  the  Romance  Languages. 
The  Professor  of  German. 
Sir  Robert  W.  Tate,  M.A. 

In  Celtic  Languages. 

Professor  of  Irish. 

Lecturer  in  Celtic  Languages. 


Honor  Lecturers  for  the  Year  1922-1923. 

In  Mathematics. 

G,  R.  Webb,  M.A, 
J.  M.  Henry,  M,A, 


30*  TTNIVERSlTr  AND   COLLEGE  OFFICERS. 


In  Classics. 


W.  Kennedy,  M.A. 
"W.  A.  Goligher,  Litt.D. 
E.  H.  Alton,  M  A. 

In  Mental  and  Moral  Philosophy. 

H.  S.  Macran,  M.A. 
R.  A.  P.  Rogers,  M.A. 
A.  A.  Luce,  D.D. 

In  Legal  and  Political  Science. . 

The  Professor  of  Political  Economy. 

The  Regius  Professor  of  Feudal  and  English  Law. 

The  Reid  Professor  of  Law. 


The  Board  nominates  Special  Courts  of  Examiners  for  Moderatorships 
and  Scholarships,  which  will  be  constituted  as  follows  for  the  year 
1923,  a  Member  of  ihe  Board  presiding  in  each  Court  of  Examiners 
for  Moderatorships : — 

Moderatorships,  1923. 

Mathematics. — R.  Russell,  M.A.  {President)  ;  R.  Russell,  M.A.;  the 
University  Professor  of  Natural  Philosophy  ;  C.  H.  Rowe,  M.A. 
(Acting  Professor  of  Mathematics);  G.  R.  Webb,  M.A. ;  J.  Eraser, 
M.A. 

Glassies. — L.  C.  Purser,  M.A.,  Litt.D.  {President)  ;  the  Regius 
Professor  of  Greek ;  the  Professors  of  Latin,  of  Ancient  History  and 
Classical  Archaeology,  and  of  Sanskrit  and  Comparative  Philology  ; 
W.  Kennedy,  M.A. ;  E.  H.  Alton,  M.A. 

Mental  and  Moral  Philosophy — A.  C.  O'SuUivan,  M.D.  {President); 
the  Professor  of  Moral  Philosophy  ;  R.  A.  P.  Rogers,  M.A.  ;  A.  A.  Luce, 
D.D.  ;  F.  La  T.  Godfrey,  M.A. 

Experimental  Science. — G.  L.  Cathcart,  M.A.  {President)  :  the 
University  Professor  of  Chemistry ;  Erasmus  Smith's  Professor 
of  Natural  and  Experimental  Philosophy ;  the  Professor  of  Applied 
Chemistry  ;  H.  Thrift,  M.A. 

Natural  Science E.  P.  Culverwell,  M.A.  {President) ;  the  Professors 

of  Comparative  Anatomy  and  Zoology,  and  of  Geology  and  Mineralogy  ; 
the  University  Professor  of  Botany ;  the  University  Professor  of 
Anatomy  and  Chirurgery  ;  the  King's  Professor  of  the  Institutes  of 
Medicine  ;  the  Professor  of  Bacteriology  and  Preventive  Medicine ; 
A.  C.  O'SuUivan,  M.D. 


TTNITEESITr  AND    COLLEGE  0PFICEE3.  31* 

History  and  rolitical  Science. — The  Vice-Provost  {President)  ;  the 
Professor  of  Political  Economy ;  the  Professor  of  Ancient  History 
and  Classical  Archaeology ;  the  Lecky  Professor  of  Modern  History ; 
Erasmus  Smith's  Professor  of  Modern  History  ;  J.  Johnston,  M.A. 

Modern  Literature. — W.  R.  "W.  Roberts,  D.D.  (President);  the 
Professors  of  English  Literature,  of  the  Romance  Languages,  and  of 
German  ;  E.  J.  Gwynn,  M.A.  ;  Sir  Robert  W.  Tate,  M.A. 

Legal  and  Political  Scie7ice.—1\\ei  Provost,  D.D.  (President);  the 
Regius  Professor  of  Laws ;  the  Regius  Professor  of  Feudal  and 
English  Law  ;  the  Reid  Professor  of  Law  ;  W.  A.  Goligher,  Litt.D.  • 

Oriental  Languages. — The  Provost,  D.D.  (President);  the  Regius 
Professor  of  Divinity;  E.  H.  Alton,  M.A. ;  R.  M.  Gwynn,  B.D.  ; 
A.  A.  Luce,  D.D. 

Scholarships,  1923. 

Classics. — The  Regius  Professor  of  Greek  ;  the  Professors  of  Latin 
and  of  Ancient  History  and  Classical  Archaeology  ;  W.  Kennedy,  M.A.; 
E.  H.  Alton,  M.A. ;  H.  Canning,  M.A.;  A.  A.  Luce,  D.D. ; 
J.  Johnston,  M.A. 

Mathematics. — The  University  Professor  of  Natural  Pliilosophy  ; 
C.  H.  Rowe,  M.A.  (Acting  Professor  of  Mathematics);  J.  Fraser, 
M.A. ;  G.  R.  Webb,  M.A, 

Exverimenial  Science. — The  University  Professor  of  Chemistry ; 
Erasmus  Smith's  Professor  of  Natural  and  Experimental  Philosophy ; 
the  Professor  of  Applied  Chemistry;  H.  Thrift,  M.A. 

Modern  Languages. — The  Professors  of  the  Romance  Languages,  and 
of  German:  E.  J.  Gwynn,  M.A.  ;  Sir  Robert  W.  Tate,  M.A. 

History. -C.  F.  Bastable,  LL.D. ;  W.  Alison  Phillips,  M.A. ; 
E.  Curtis,  M.A. 

Natural  Science.— J.  B.  Gatenby,  D.Sc;  J.  Joly,  Sc.D. ;  H.  H. 
Dixon,  Sc.D. 

Philosophy.— R.  S.  Macran,  M.A. ;  R.  A.  P.  Rogers,  M.A.  ;  A.  A. 
Luce,  D.D. ;  F.  La  T.  Godfrey,  M.A. 


32*  UNITEE8ITY   AND   COLLEGE   OFFICRES. 

PROFESSORS    AND    LECTURERS 

Arranged  under  subjects  and  schools. 

[Figures  added  in  brackets  after  the  title  or  name  of  any  officer 
denote  the  period  in  years  for  which  the  election  is  made.  Officers 
marked  (*)  are  elected  annually.] 

The  following  Offices  become  vacant  at  the  dates  respectively  affixed 
to  them ! — 

Professorship  of  Latin,  1922,  Nov.  13. 

Professorship  of  Ecclesiastical  History,  1923,  May  7. 

Erasmus  Smith's  Professorship  of  Mathematics,  1923,  May  27. 

Lecturership  in  Mathematics,  1923,  June  12. 

Professorship  of  Modern  East  Indian  Languages,  1923,  June  18. 

Professorship  of  Surgery,  1923,  July  1. 

Mathematical,  Physical,  and  Natural  Science. 

First  Last 

Election.  Election 

Erasmus  Smith's  Professor  of  Mathematics. 

[Founded  1762.] 
[Vacant.] 
Acting  Professor  for  one  year  : 
Mav  '^7    I      Charles  Henry  Rowe,  M.A. 

Donegal  Lecturer  in  Mathematics. 

[Founded  1675.] 
1917      ) 
Nov    10   I      Reginald  Arthur  Percy  Rogers,  M.A. 

University  Professor  of  Natural  Philosophy. 

[Founded  1847.} 
June  30     1      Matthew  Wyatt  Joseph  Fry,  M.A. 
Assistant: — John  Fraser,  M.A. 

Erasmus  Smith's  Professor  of  Natural  and 

Experimental  Philosophy. 

[Founded  1724.] 

Mar^.^2:j.  }      '^^^^^'^^  Edward  Thrift,  M.A. 

Assistants: — Harry  Thrift,  M.A. 

John  Hewitt  Jellett  Poole,  Sc.D. 

Royal  Astronomer  of  Ireland,  on  the  Foundation  of 
Dr.  Andrews. 

[Founded  1783.  j 

[Suspended.] 

Assistant: — Charles  Martin,  M.A. 


ONIVKIUSITY    AND   COLLKGK   OFFICKKS.  33* 

?irst  Last 

Blection.  Election 

University  Professor  of  Chemistry,  (7) 
[Founded  1711.  j 
Oc^lo.   }      Sydney  Young,  M.A.,Sc.D.  1917. 

Assistant :  William  Cecil  Eamsden,  M.A. 
Demonstrator  :  James  Bell,  B.A. 

Professor  of  Applied  Chemistry. 

[Founded  in  1841  as  a  Professorship  of  Chemisti-y  and  Geology  applied  to  the 
Alts  of  Construction  :  discontinued  in  1881 ;  re-establislied  in  1904  as  a 
Professorship  of  Applied  Chemistry.] 

Nov^%   }     ^^^^  Alphonse  Werner,  M.A.,  Sc.D. 

University  Professor  of  Botany.  (7) 

[Founded  1711.] 
A^^l^ie    1      Henry  Horatio  Dixon,  Sc.D.  1918. 

Assistant : — Nigel  Gresley  Ball,  M.A. 

Professor  of  Geology  and  Mineralogy, 
[Founded  1844.] 

Ocri'e   1    "^"^^  *^°^y'  ^'^•'  ^^•^' 

Assistant:  Louis  Bouvier  Smyth,  Sc.B. 
Research  Assistant:  John  Hewitt  Jellett  Poole,  Sc.D. 


Professor  of  Zoology  and  Comparative  Anatomy,  (5) 

[A  LectureshiD  in  Zoology  was  established  in  1857,  was  made  a  Professorship 
in  1872,  and  was  permanently  united  in  1895  to  the  Professorship  ot  Com- 
parative Anatomy,  which  had  been  founded  in  1872.] 

1921.     \      James  Bronte   Gatenby,  B.A.,   D.Phil.,  (Oxen.),   D.Sc. 
^June  23. )         (Lond.). 

Lecturer  in  Paleontology. 
[Founded  1913.] 
[March  1  1      Louis  Bouvier  Smyth,  Sc.B.,  M.A. 

Lecturer  in  Mathematics.  (3) 

[Founded  1918.] 
Ijulie^f2    1     Timothy  Stanislaus  Broderick,  B.A. 

c  3 


34*  UNIVKK8ITY   AND   COLLEGK   OFFICEJftS. 

First  Last 

Election.  Election 

Languages  and  Litkkatuue. 
Regius  Professor  of  Greek, 
[Founded  1761.] 
Nov  ^3   I     ^'^^^^''^  Gilbart  Smyly,  Litt.D. 

Professor  of  Latin.  (7) 

[Founded  1870.] 

1915       \ 
jj        ,'„    >      George  William  Mooney,  M.A. 

Lecturer  in  Classical  Composition. 

[Founded  189G.] 

1908^    j      g.^,  j^o^grt  William  Tate,  M.A. 
Nov.   /.  ) 

Professor  of  Hebrew .  ( 7 ) 
[Founded  by  the  Board  of  Erasmus  Smith,  1724.] 
Felf^2i    )  Robert  Malcolm  Gwynn,  B.D. 

Lecturers  in  Hehrew. 
*Xewport  John  Davis  White,  D.D. 
♦William  Kennedy,  M.A. 
♦Ernest  Henry  Alton,  M.A. 

Professor  of  Arabic,  Persian,  and  Hindustani.  (7) 

[Founded  1856.] 

Mar^2  }      Sir  Lucas  White  King,  LL.D.  1919. 

Professor  of  Sanskrit  and  Comparative  Philology,  (5) 
[Founded  1858.] 
Dlc.^tg.}     Hugh  Canning,  M.A.  1919. 

Professor  of  the  Romance  Languages. 
[Founded  1778  as  Professorship  of  Italian  and  Spanish.] 

1909.^  \     Thomas  Brown  Rudmose-Brown,  M.A. 
Nov.    lo.  I 

Professor  of  German. 


[Founded  in  1778  as  Professorship  of  French  and  German  ,•  the  Cliair  of 
French  isnow  merged  in' that  of  Romance  Languages.] 


1915. 


June 


I*     \     Gilbert  Waterhouse,  M.A.,  Litt.D. 


tJNiVEESlTf    AND   COLLEGE   OFFICERS.  35* 

First  !•*« 

Election.  Election 

Professor  of  Irish,  (5) 
[Founded  1840.] 
jX^I     }      Thomas  Francis  O'Eahilly. 

Professor  of  Modern  East  Indian  Languagei.  (5) 
[Founded  1913.] 
June  IS    (      ^^^^  ^^'i  Someren  Pope,  M.A.  1918. 

Lecturer  in  Celtic  Languages. 
[Founded  1907.  j 

Nov°"i4   }      Edward  John  Gwynn,  M.A. 

Lecturer  in  Anglo-Saxon.  (5) 

[Founded  1907.] 

June^^*2  I      Gilbert  Waterhouse,  M.A.,  Litt.D.  1920. 

Lecturer  tn  Italian.  (1) 
[Founded  1916.] 
Jan^'^lT   }      Sir  Robert  William  Tate,  M.A. 

Lecturer  in  Languages. 
[Founded  1920.] 
OQi'l'b    1      Walter  FitzwilUam  Starkie,  M.A. 

Lecturer  in  Classics  and  Experimental  Science  (3). 

[Founded  1920.] 
cir  17  }      ^^^^7'  Kenneth  Claude,  M.A. 

Professor  of  English  Literature. 

[Founded  1867.] 
Nov^^2'>  I  Wilbraham  Fitzjoha  Trench,  Litt.D. 

Erasmus  SmitWs  Professor  of  Oratory. 

[Founded  1724  as  a  Professorship  of  Orator>-  and  Modem  History;  the 
>Iodern  History  was  made  a  separate  Chair  in  1762.J 

Nov^  H  }     Edmund  Curtis,  M.A. 

Menial  and  Mokal  Science. 

Professor  of  Moral  Philosophy,  (5) 

[Founded  1837.] 

1919     \ 
J  ,    '.    I  Henry  Stewart  Macran,  M.A. 


36*  UNIVERSITY   AND   COLLEGE  OFFICERS. 

First  last 

Election.  Election. 

History  and  Political  Science. 

Professor  of  Political  Economy, 
[Founded  1832.] 

„^^^^-     \      Charles  Francis  Bastable,  LL.D. 
Mar.   2o.  j 

Erasmus  Smith's  Professor  of  Modern  History, 
[Founded  1762.] 

T  ^^^1;,   ]      Edmund  Curtis,  M.A. 
June  27.  ) 

Lecky  Professor  of  Modern  History. 
([Founded  1913.] 

T  ^^^tv  \     Walter  AUson  Phillips,  M.A. 
June  26. )  '^  ' 

Professor  of  Ancient  History  and  Classical  Archeology.  (5) 
[Founded  1869  aa  a  Professorship  of  Ancient  History.    Title  altered  in  1909.] 
June*4    }     William  Alexander  Goligher,M.A.,Litt.D.  1919. 

Assistant : — Joseph  Johnston,  M.A.  (1) 

Lecturer  in  Modern  History, 
[Founded  1911.]' 

T        nA    \      Constantia  Elizabeth  Maxwell,  M.A. 
June  24.  I  ' 


Divinity. 

Regius  Professor  of  Divinity, 

Founded  160V  (t  1600)  as  Professorship  of  Divinity  ;  made  a  Kegius  Professorship,  1761. 

o  ^^.^^Q   \     Alan  Hugh  McNeile,  D.D. 
Sept.  19.  j  °  ' 

Assistants  : 
•Hugh  Jackson  Lawlor,  D.D.,  Litt.D. 
*Arthur  Aston  Luce,  D.D. 


Archbishop  King's  Professor  of  Divinity, 

;  a  Lectureship  in  1718,  cbanfced  to  a  Professorshi 
Decembers,  1906.] 

Jan    22   [  Newport  John  Davis  White,  D.D 


[Founded  as  a  Lectureship  in  1718,  chanRcd  to  a  Professorship  by  a  Decree  dated 
Decembers,  1906.] 


Assistants: 

•Hugh  Jackson  Lawior,  D.D. 
*John  Charles  Forrester,  M.A. 


UNIVKRSITT   AND   COLLEGE   OFFICERS.  37* 

first  Last 

Blection,  Election 

Professor  of  Biblical  Greek.  (5) 

[Founded  1838.] 

Feb^^%  I     Kobert  Malcolm  Gwynn,  B.D.  1921. 

Professor  of  Ecclesiastical  History.  (5) 

[Founded  1850.] 

May  ^7     }      Hugh  Jackson  Lawlor,D.D.,Litt.D.  1918. 

Professor  of  Pastoral  Theology.  (5) 

[Founded  1888.] 

Oct°^2'3   i      Thomas  William  Ernest  Drury,  M.A.  • 

Lecturer  in  the  English  Bible,  (5) 

I  Founded  1898.] 

Jan^29    I      Hugh  Jackson  Lawlor,  D.D.,  Litt.D.  1921 

Wallace  Divinity  Lecturer. 
[Founded  1901.] 
yr       \    \     John  Andrew  Jennings,  M.A. 

Chaplain  to  the  Church  of  Ireland  Students. 
Oct^  10  1     ^^^^  Charles  Forrester,  M.A. 


Donnellan  Lecturer,  (1) 

1922       \ 
J  ne  10    (      I^^giiiald  Arthur  Percy  Rogers,  M.A. 


Catechists — Presbyterian  Church. 
1886.  John  Love  Morrow,  M.A.  (R.U.I.). 

Oct^^ie    }     ^o^«*^  Kennedy  Hanna,  B.A.  (R.U.I. ). 

Law. 
Regius  Professor  of  Laws, 
[Founded  1668.] 
F  ^^^^29   }      ^^*^^^^  Francis  Bastable,  LL.D. 


38*  uNivERsitr  and  coLtEoi;  oFFicEks. 

First  I-as*' 

Election.  Election 

lieyius  Professor  of  Feudal  and  Ewjiish  Law,  (5) 

[Founded  1761.] 

olt^\\   ]     ^^^^^  Sinclair  Baxter,  M.A.,  LL.D.  1919. 

Reid  Professor  of  Penal  Legislation,  Constitutional  and 
Criminal  Law,  and  the  Law  of  Evidence.  (5) 
[Founded  188S.] 
J^^21    ]      Mi^^ae^  Joseph  Ryan,  LL.B.  (N.U.I.). 

Lecturer  in  Civil  Law  and  General  Jurisprudence. 
.[Founded  1920.] 
De^c^^S     1      James  Sinclair  Baxter,  M.A.,  LL.D. 

Medicinf,. 

Regius  Professor  of  Physic. 
[Founded  1637.] 

V  ^l^Vc,    \     John  Mallet  Purser,  M.D. 
Feb.  10.   ) 

Regius  Professor  of  Surgery.  (5) 

[Founded  1852.] 

i.}^'^hc.   \      Sir  William  Taylor,  M.D.,  K.B.E. 
May  20.  j  •' 

Professor  of  Surgery.  (7) 
[Founded  1849.] 
1916.     I      Thomas  Eagleson  Gordon,  M.B. 

Assistant'.  William  Pearson,  M.D. 

University  Professor  of  Anatomy  and  Chirurgery.  (7) 

[Founded  1711.J 

1903.     j      Andrew  Francis  Dixon,  M.B.,  Sc.D.  1917. 

June  20.  ) 

Professor  of  Bacteriology  and  Preventive  Medicine.  (7) 

[Founded  1919.] 
^^22  }      -A-drian  Slokes,  M.D. 

*  Chief  Demonstrator .       • 


1919 
Oct 


1920 
Oct.  23 


I     Cecil  McLaren  West,  M.B. 


ciirivEKSiTr  and  college  offickrs.  39' 


Plrst 
SlMtion. 

*  Universiiy  Atiatuviist. 

[Kounded  1716.1 

„-^2^;     \      Cecil  M'Laren  West,  M.B. 
May  27.   J 

*  Lecturer  in  Medical  Jurisprudence. 
[Founded  1888.] 
A  ^^^7    }      ^^"^  Theodore  Bewley,  M.D. 

Lecturer  in  Pathology. 
[Founded  1895.] 

1895.     \      Alexander  Charles  O'SuUivan,  M.D. 
June  22.  ) 

Senior  Assistant  .-—Joseph  Theodore  "Wigham,  M.D. 
Junior  Assistant  .-—Victor  Millington  Synge,  M.B. 

Lecturer  in  Applied  Anatoniy. 
[Founded  1919.] 

,,'r  i"c    }      Adams  Andrew  McConnell,  M.B. 
Oct.  15.  ) 

King' s  Professor  of  Practice  of  Medicine. *^ 
[Founded  1717.] 

1910.  James  Craig,  M.D. 

Kifig's  Professor  of  Materia  Medica  and  Pharmacy.* 
[Founded  1749.] 

S^^h    \     Thomas  Gillman  Moorhead,  M.D. 
*eb.  8,   ) 

King's  Professor  of  Institutes  of  Medicine.* 
[Founded  1786.1 

MaV'c'rfs.}      Harold  Pringle,  M.D. 

First  Assistant : — William  Rohert  Fearon,  Sc.D. 

King's  Professor  of  Midwifery.* 

[  Founded  1827.] 

1911.  Thomas  Henry  Wilson,  M.A. 

*  Lecturer  in  Dental  Surgery  and  Dental  Pathology. 
[Founded  1910.] 

.  ^^.]^-     ]         Arthur  Windo we WiUert  Baker,  M.D.,  M.Dent.Sc. 
April  30.  ) 

*  Appointed  by  the  Royal  College  of  Physicians  of  Ireland. 


Last 
Election 


40*  UNIVERSITT   AND   COLLKGE   OFFICERS. 

First  Last 

Klection.  Election. 

*Lecturer  in  Dental  Mechanics. 
[Founded  1910.] 
At)ril  30    1      "Joseph  Cockburn. 

*Leciurer  in  Orthodontia. 
[Founded  1910.] 
April^SO  }     ^'■°«s*  Sheldon  Friel,  M.Dent.Sc. 

*  Lecturer  in  Aneesthetics. 
[Founded  1910.] 
Anril  30   i      Thomas  Percy  Claude  Kirkpatrick,  M.D. 

Honorary  Professor  of  Laryngology  and  Otology. 
[Founded  in  1916  for  present  holder  only.] 
June^  n   1      ®^^  Robert  Henry  Woods,  M.Ch. 

Honorary  Professor  of  Dermatology . 
[Founded  in  1917  for  present  holder  only.] 
Jun^e^23.  }     'Wallace  Beatty,  M.D. 


Engineering. 
Professor  of  Civil  Engineering ,  (5) 

[Founded  1842.  J 

Jun^e^^23   }      David  Clark,  B.Sc  (Lond.). 

Assistants: — Walter  Elsworthv  Lilly,  M.A.,  M.A.I. 
Sc.D. 
James  Thomas  Jackson,  M.A. 

Lecturer  in  the  Practice  of  Electrical  Engineering. 

[Founded  1902.] 

1902.     j      ^iiiian^  Tatlow,  M.A.,  B.A.I. 
Mar.    10.  )  ' 

Lecturer  in  Electric  Traction. 

I  Founded  1903.] 
1912        I 
A     1  20    [     George  Marshall  Harriss. 


DNIVKBSlTr   AND   COLLEGE  OFFICKKS.  41* 

First  Last 

Election.  Election . 

Lecturer  in  Mechanical  Engineering . 

[Founded  1903.] 
mI^^Is    1      ^^^^'®''  ^Isworthy  Lilly,  M.A.,  M.A.I.,  Sc.D. 

Lecturer  in  the  Engineering  School.    (1) 

ii-  Fjaidoai     920.] 

June^5    I     J^^s^P^  Kogerson  Cotter,  M.A.  1922. 

Honorary  Professor  of  Harbour  Engineering. 
[Founded  In  1920  for  present  holder  only.] 
Ma^^29    }      Sir  John  Purser  Griffith,  M.A.I. 

Indian  Civil  Service. 
Reader  in  Tamil,  Telugu,  Burmese^  Hindi,  Bengali^  and  Marathl. 

[Founded  1902.] 
Dp      10   }     John  van  Someren  Pope,  M.A. 

Reader  in  Indian  History. 
[Founded  1903.] 
1905.  Sir  Lucas  "White  King,  LL.D. 

Music. 
Professor  of  Music.  (5) 
[Founded  1764.] 
No^^^lS  1     ^^"^^8  Herhert  Kitson,  M.A.  (Cantah.),  Mus.D.  (Oxon.). 

Education. 

Professor  of  Education.  (5) 
[Founded  1905.] 

T  ^^^  o.   1     Robert  John  Fynne,  M.A. 
June  24.  )  ^       ' 


Public  Orator. 
[Founded  1879.] 
Ma^^^lG  I      ^^"^  Robert  William  Tate,  M.A. 


42*  ONIVERSITY    AND    COLLEGK   OFFICKKS. 

First  Last 

Election.  '  Election 

Librarian,  (10) 

Jau^^^i  1      "^^^^^^  Gilbart  Smyly,  l.itt.D. 

Senior  Assistant  Librarian — Alfred  Charles  De  Burgh,  M.A. 
Junior  Assistant  Librarian — Samuel  Edward  Brambell. 
Third  Assistant — William  John  Butler,  M.A. 
Fourth  Assistant. — Francis  Stevenson  Marsh,  M.A.,  LL.B. 
^;    -      (  Joseph  Hanna  (Lending  Library  and  Lecky  Library). 
Oier/cs   ^  Edward  Archibald  Phelps. 

*  Auditor, 

v-^^^^nn  \      George  Lambert  Cathcart,  M.A. 
Jsov.  20. )  ° 

External  Auditor. 

Oc?^n  }      Frank  Leet,  LL.D. 

*  Registrar  of  the  Senate. 

i^j^^^hn  ]      Louis  Claude  Purser,  Litt.D. 
Nov.  20.  ) 

Lecture  Committee, 
The  Senior  Lecturer. 
H.  Canning,  M.A. 
H.  Thrift,  M.A. 
T.  B.  Rudmose-Brown,  M.A. 

E.  A.  Werner,  Sc.D. 

The  Secretary  of  the  Divinity  School  Council. 

The  Registrars  of  the  Schools  of  Law,  Medicine,  Engineering,  and  of 
the  Indian  and  Home  Civil  Service. 

F.  La  T.  Godfrey,  M.A.,  Secretary. 

*  Registrar  of  the  Law  School,. 
1917^    I     William  Alexander  Goligher,  Litt.D. 

*  Registrar  of  the  School  of  Physic. 
Oct^^U    1      -A.lexander  Charles  0' Sullivan,  M.D. 

Assistant  Registrar^  School  of  Physic. 
Mav    2*4  }        George  Leverstone  Allen. 

*  Registrar  of  the  Engineering  School, 
Mar^^e  }      WUliam  Edward  Thrift,  M.A. 


ifNlVKKSlTr    AND   COLLKOK   OKKICEKS.  43* 

*  Registrar  of  the  School  of  Music. 


first  Last 

Election.  Election 


jj        20    [      Henry  Stewart  Macran,  M.A. 

*  Registrar  of  the  Indian  and  Home  Civil  Service  School. 
Nov  ''0   [      Ernest  Henry  Alton,  M.A. 

Registrar  of  the  School  of  Education. 
June^24    }      ^<^^^^^  •'otn  Fynne,  M.A. 

*  Registrar  of  the  School  of  Agriculture. 
nJv.^*20.}     JohnJoly,Sc.D. 

*  Registrar  of  South  African  Students. 
Mar.^22.  }      ^^°''8^  Randolph  Webb,  M.A. 

Lady  Registrar. 

T  ^^^^io  1      Olive  Constance  Purser,  M.A. 
June   22. ) 

Warden  of  Trinity  Hall. 
J  1     24    I      Elizabeth  Margaret  Cunningham,  M.A. 


Director  of  the  diuseutn. 

Br( 
June  23.  |  (Lend.). 


1921.     \     James   Bronte  Gatenby,    B.A.,    D.Pliil.  (Oxon.),   D.Sc. 

23.  )  -'       •  - 


Director  of  the  Botanical  Gardens  and  Park. 

l^^i'    ]      Henrv  Horatio  Dixon,  Sc.D. 
Jan  20.  ) 

Law  Agent  and  Keeper  of  the  Records. 
Nov^^ll    1      ^^®'^^"<=^  ^^g^y  Barley,  M.A. 


^^^^-     }     James  Hunter  Shaw,  M.A. 


44*  UNlVERSITr   AND   COLLEGE   OFFICEUS. 

First  I-ast 

Election.  "  Election 

Assisiatit  to  the  Registrar  of  University  Electors. 
March  8. 

Accou7itani. 
rv       ^2"    I      -Alfred  Grahame  Bailey. 

Organist  and  Choir-Master. 
Ju\^^2i     }      •^**^'^  Purser  Shortt,  M.A. 

Gentlemen  of  the  Choir. 


Thomas  Frederick  Marchant. 
John  Richard  Morgan. 
Charles  Kelly. 
Thomas  Harris  Watson. 


James  Edward  Payne. 
James  Martin. 
John  Gill. 


Chief  Steward. 
y         '„    I  Joseph  Marshall. 


Booksellers. 

Hodges,  Figgis,  and  Co.,  20  Nassau  Street,  Dublin. 
Fred  Hanna,  29  Nassau  Street,  Dublin. 
Blond  and  Gay,  20  Anne  Street,  S.,  Dublin. 
Longmans,  Green,  and  Co.,  London. 


Rohemakers. 
A.  and  P.  Thompson,  8  Westmoreland  Street,  Dublin. 


(     45*     ) 


'^mhtxfi  of  340OI  Committer. 

Mathematics.— 'EraBmns  Smith's  Professor  of  Mathematics ;  the 
University  Professor  of  Natural  Philosophy;  Erasmus  Smith's  Pro- 
fessor of  Natural  and  Experimental  Philosophy ;  the  Astronomer 
Royal  on  the  Foundation  of  Dr.  Andrews  ;  T.  T.  Gray,  M.A. ;  W.  R.  W. 
Roberts,  D.D. ;  E.  P.  Culverwell,  M.A.  ;  A.  C.  O'SuUivan,  M.D.; 
R.  A.  P.  Rogers,  M.A. ;  J.  Fraser,  M.A.  ;  G.  R.  Webb,  M.A. ; 
H.  Thrift,  M.A.  ;  J.  M.  Henry,  M.A. ;  Charles  Henry  Rowe,  B.A. 
(Quorum  5.) 

Classics. — The  Regius  Professor  of  Greek  ;  the  Professor  of  Latin  ; 
the    Professor    of  Ancient   History   and    Classical   Archaeology ;   the 
Professor  of   Sanskrit  and  Comparative  Philology  ;  T.  T.  Gray.  M.A. 
L.  C.  Purser,  Litt.D.  ;  A.  C.  O'Sullivan,  M.D.  ;  H.  S.  Macra-n,  M.A. 
E.    J.   Gwynn,    M.A.  ;    W.   Kennedy,  M.A.,    £.   H.   Alton,  M.A, 
R.  M.  Gwynn,  B.D.  ;  Sir  Robert  W.  Tate,  M.A.  ;  A.  A.  Luce,  D.D. 
J.    Johnston,    M.A. ;  J.  M.  Henry,  M.A.  ;  F.  La  T.  Godfrey,  B.A. 
(Quorum  5.) 

Hebrew  and  Oriental  Langtiages. — The  Professor  of  Hebrew  ;  the 
Lecturers  in  Hebrew  ;  the  Examiners  in  Hebrew,  Chaldee,  and  Syriac  ; 
the  Professor  of  Arabic,  Persian,  and  Hindustani;  the  Professor 
of  Sanskrit  and  Comparative  Philology  ;  T.  T.  Gray,  M.A.  ; 
E.  J.  Gwynn,  M.A. ;  A.  A.  Luce,  D.D. ;  John  van  Someren  Pope, 
M.A.  (Quorum  4.) 

Mental  and  Moral  Science. — The   Professor  of  Moral   Philosophy 

E.  P.  Culverwell,  M.A.;  A.  C.  O'Sullivan,  M.D.  ;  E.  J.  Gwynn,  M.A. 
W.  E.  Thrift,  M.A.  ;  G.  W.  Mooney,  M.A.  ;  W.  Kennedy,  M.A. 
R.  A.  P.  Rogers,  M.A.;  E.  H.  Alton,  M.A. ;  R.  M.  Gwynn,  B.D. 
G.  R.Webb,  M.A.  ;  Sir  Robert  W.  Tate,  M.A.  ;  H.  Canning,  M.A. 
A.    A.    Luce,    D.D. ;     J.    Johnston,   B.A. ;     J.   M.   Henry,   M.A. 

F.  La  T.  Godfrey,  B.A,  ;  W.  R.  Fearon,  Sc.D.     (Quorum  5.) 
Experimental  Science. — Erasmus  Smith's   Professor  of  Natural  and 

Experimental  Philosophy  ;  the  University  Professor  of  Chemistry  ;  the 
Professor  of  Applied  Chemistry ;  W.  R.  W.  Roberts,  D.D.  ;  E.  P. 
Culverwell,  M.A. ;  R.  Russell,  M.A.  ;  M.  W.  J.  Fry,  M.A. ; 
J.  Fraser,  M.A. ;  H.  Thrift,  M.A. ;  J.  Joly,  Sc.D.  ;  W.  R.  Fearon,  Sc.D. 
(Quorum  4.) 

Natural  Scietice. — Erasmus  Smith's  Professor  of  Natural  and  Experi- 
mental Philosophy ;  the  Professor  of  Geology  and  Mineralogy ;  the 
University  Professor  of  Anatomy  and  Chirurgery ;  the  Professor  of 
Zoology  and  Comparative  Anatomy :  the  University  Professor  of 
Chemistry  ;  the  University  Professor  of  Botany ;  the  King's  Professor 
of  Institutes  of  Medicine  ;  the  Lecturer  in  Pathology.     (Quorum  4.) 

History  and  Political  Science. — The  Lecky  Professor  of  Modern 
History;  Erasmus  Smith's  Professor  of  Modem  History  ;  the  Professor 
of  Ancient  History  and  Classical  Archaeology ;  the  Professor  of  Political 
Economy  ;  L.  C.  Purser,  Litt.D. ;  the  Lecturers  for  Moderatorsbips  and 


46*  MEMBERS  OF  SCHOOL  COMMITTEKS. 

Honors  in  History  and  Political  Science  ;  the  Examiners  for  Moderator- 
ship  in  Honors  in  History  and  Political  Science  ;  Miss  C.  E.  Maxwell, 
M.A.     (Quorum  4.) 

Modern  Languages  and  Literature. — The  Professor  of  English 
Literature ;  the  Professor  of  the  Romance  Languages  ;  the  Professor  of 
German  ;  tlie  Lecturer  in  Anglo-Saxon  ;  the  Professor  of  Sanskrit  and 
Comparative  Philology  ;  the  Lecturers  for  Moderatorship  and  Honors 
in  Modern  Languages  and  Literature  ;  the  Examiners  for  Moderator - 
ship,  Scholarship,  and  Honors  in  Modern  Languages  and  Literature : 
E.  J.  Gwynn,  M.A.  ;  Sir  Robert  W.  Tate,  M.A.     (Quorum  4.) 

Legal  and  Political  Science. — The  Regius  Professor  of  Laws  ;  the 
Regius  Professor  of  Feudal  and  English  Law  ;  the  Professor  of  Civil  Law 
and  General  Jurisprudence;  the  Professor  of  Political  Economy;  the 
Reid  Professor  of  Penal  Legislation,  Constitutional  and  Criminal  Law, 
and  Law  of  Evidence  ;  the  Lecturers  and  Examiners  for  Moderatorship 
and  Honors  in  Legal  and  Political  Science.     (Quorum  4.) 

Celtic  Languages. — TheProfessor  of  Irish;  the  Lecturer  in  Celtic  Langu- 
ages ;  the  Professor  of  Sanskrit  and  Comparative  Philology ;  Edmund 
Curtis,  M.A. ;  C.  H.  Rowe,  M.A.     (Quorum  3.) 

Law. — The  Regius  Professor  of  Laws  ;  the  Regius  Professor  of 
Feudal  and  English  Law ;  the  Professor  of  Civil  Law  and  General 
Jurisprudence ;  the  Reid  Professor  of  Penal  Legislation,  Constitutional 
and  Criminal  Law,  and  Law  of  Evidence ;  the  Registrar  of  the  Law 
School.     (Quorum  4.) 

Physic. — The  Regius  Professor  of  Physic ;  the  Regius  Professor  of 
Surgery ;  the  Professor  of  Surgery ;  the  University  Professor  of 
Anatomy  and  Chirurgery  ;  the  Professor  of  Comparative  Anatomy  ; 
the  University  Professor  of  Botany ;  the  Lecturer  in  Medical  Juris- 
prudence ;  the  University  Professor  of  Chemistry ;  the  Lecturer  in 
Pathology  ;  Erasmus  Smith's  Professor  of  Natural  and  Experimental 
Philosophy ;  the  Four  King's  Professors ;  Professor  of  Bacteriology 
and  Preventive  Medicine;  the  Registrar  of  the  School  of  Physic; 
Prof.  Sir  Robert  H.  Woods,  M.Ch. ;  A.  W.  W.  Baker,  M.D.  ;  Professor 
Wallace  Boatty,  M.D.  ;  Prof.  E.  A  Werner,  Sc.D.     (Quorum  7.) 

Engineering. — The  Professor  of  Civil  Engineering ;  the  Erasmus 
Smith's  Professor  of  Natural  and  Experimental  Philosophy ;  the 
Professor  of  Geology  and  Mineralogy  ;  the  University  Professor  of 
Chemistry  ;  the  Professor  of  Applied  Chemistry  ;  the  Donegal  Lecturer 
in  Mathematics;  the  Assistant  to  the  Professor  of  Natural  Philosophy  : 
the  Lecturer  in  the  practice  of  Electrical  Engineering ;  the  Lecturer  in 
Electric  Traction;  the  Lecturer  in  Mechanical  Engineering;  the  Registrar 
of  the  Engineering  School;  J.  T.  Jackson,  M.A.;  H.  Thrift,  M.A. 
(Quorum  5.) 

Indian  and  Home  Civil  Service. — The  Readers  and  Lecturers  for  the 
Indian  and  Home  Civil  Service  ;  the  Registrar  for  the  Indian  and  Home 
Civil  Service  School.     (Quorum  6.) 

Music. — The  Professor  of  Music;  the  Examiners  in  the  School  of 
Music  ;  the  Registrar  of  the  Scliool  of  Music.     (Quorum  2.) 

Education. — The  Professor  of  Education  ;  the  Professor  of  Moral 
Philosophy ;  the  Examiners  in  the  School  of  Education  ;  the  Registrar 
of  the  School  of  Education.     (Quorum  2.) 


MEMBERS  OF   SCHOOL   COMMITTEES.  47* 

Agriculture.— The  Professor  of  Zoology;  the  University  Professor 
of  Chemistry  ;  the  Professor  of  Applied  Chemistry  ;  the  University 
Professor  of  Botany ;  Erasmus  Smith's  Professor  of  Natural  and 
Experimental  Philosophy  ;  the  Professor  of  Geology  and  Mineralogy ; 
the  Registrar  of  the  School  of  Agriculture.     (Quorum  5.) 


tmhrn  0f  tl^^  Ittorsilg  C0tt«nl. 


The  Pkovost. 

Thb  Senior  Lbctureu 

The  Registrar. 


[Retire  1924.) 
Robert  Russell,  M.A. 
Ernest  Henry  Alton,  M.A. 

{Retire  1925.) 
Matthew  Wyatt  Joseph  Fry,  M.A. 
Francis  La  Touche  Godfrey,  M.A. 
William  Edward  Thrift,  M.A. 
Gilbert  "Waterhouse,  Litt.D. 
George  Randolph  Webb,  M.A. 
Emil  Alphonse  Werner,  Sc.D. 


{Retire  1922.) 
James  Sinclair  Baxter,  LL.D. 
Andrew  Francis  Dixon,  Sc.D. 
Alexander  Charles  O'SuUivan,  M.D. 
John  Joly,  Sc.D.  {Secretary). 


{Retire  1923.) 
Sir  John  William  Moore,  M.D. 
Arthur  Warren  Samuels,  LL.D. 
Robert  Macalister,  LL.D. 
Claude  Blakeley  Armstrong,  M.A. 


Ordinary  Meetings  of  the  Council  are  held  on  the  first  and  fourth 
Wednesdays  after  the  commencement  of  lectures  in  each  term,  but  if 
in  Hilary  Term  either  of  these  days  falls  on  Ash  Wednesday,  then  the 
meetings  are  held  on  the  second  and  fifth  Wednesdays  after  lectures 
commenced.  In  Michaelmas  Term  the  second  meeting  is  held  on  the 
second  Wednesday  in  December.  In  the  years  1922,  1923  these 
Wednesdays  will  fall  on  :— Nov.  8,  Dec.  13, 1922,  and  Feb.  7,  Feb.  28, 
May  9,  May  30,  Nov.  7,  Dec.  12,  1923. 

/ 


48*  DIVINITY   SCHOOL   COUNCIL. 


Imhtxn  ot  t|^  iibittitii  ^t^aol  Caimnl. 


(a)  The  Provost  (Chairman). 

(b)  Five  representatives  of  the  Board : — 

Louis  Claude  Purser,  Litt.D. 
William  Ralph  "Westropp  Roberts,  D.D. 
Matthew  Wyatt  Joseph  Fry,  M.A. 
William  Edward  Thrift,  M.A. 
Ernest  Henry  Alton,  M.A. 

(c)  Three  Members  of  the  Teaching  Staff: — 

The  Regius  Professor  of  Divinity. 
Archbishop  King's  Professor  of  Divinity. 
Hugh  Jackson  Lawlor,  D.D. 

(d)  Three  Representatives  of  the  Bishops  of  the  Church  of  Ireland : 

Archbishop  of  Armagh. 
Archbishop  of  Dublin. 
Bishop  of  Killaloe. 


Meetings  of  the  Council  are  held  on  the  Thursday  after  the  third 
Wednesday  in  November,  January,  February,  May,  and  June,  at  2.30 
o'clock. 


(     49*     ) 

"gxkxnx^,  ^jci^tttiiijc,  mis  a^tt  Siomim  oi  %ximiti  (S/olhgt, 

COLLEGE    HISTORICAL   SOCIETY. 
Founded  1770. 

President — The  flight  Hon.  Sir  John  Eoss,  Bart.,  LL.D.,  Lord 
Chancellor  of  Ireland. 

OFFICERS  AND  COMMITTEES,  SESSION  1922-1923. 

Auditor — Mark  Wilson  (Sch.,  Sen.  Mod.),  B.A. 

Treasurer — T.  E.  Johnston,  B.A.,  LL.B. 

Mecord  Secretary^?.  Bourke  (Sch.). 

Correspondence  Secretary — T.  J.  Johnston  (Sch.). 

Librarian — N.  S.  Gaflfney. 

General  Committee. 


R.  Brereton  Barry  {Ex-Anditvr). 
W.  Holmes  (Sch.). 
J.  B.  Gregg. 


J.  M.  Shepherd. 
Donogh  Bryan. 
J.  Lyle  Donaghy. 


F.  D.  M'Carthy-Morrogh. 

Library  Committee. 
H.  Huglies.  I  T.  E.  Dickson. 

F.  G.  0.  Budd.  I  0.  D.  M'Carthy  Willis. 

MEDALS— 1921-1922. 

Oratory— Go\A,       .         .        Mark  Wilson  (Sch.,  Sen.  Mod.),  B.A. 
Silver,    .        .        P.  Bourke  (Sch.). 

History,         )       ^        ^        [Not  yet  awarded.] 
Composition,   )  "-         '     .  ■" 

There  are  connected  with  the  Society  a  Reading  and  Writing  Room, 
Library,  and  Billiard  Room.     Cap  and  Gown  boxes  are  provided. 

A  number  of  newspapers,  magazines,  and  reviews  are  taken  in  the 
Reading  Room. 

Gold  and  Silver  Medals  are  annually  given  for  Oratory,  Composition, 
and  History. 

The  Opening  Meeting  of  the  Session  is  held  on  the  first  Wednesday  in 
November,  and  Debates  take  place  in  the  New  Debating  Hall,  Graduates' 
Memorial  Building,  every  Wednesday  evening  during  Term  from 
November  lo  June. 

.\11  Students  of  the  University  are  eligible  as  Members  of  the  Society. 
Annual  Subscription,  £1  10s. 

Members  of  the  Society  are  Honorary  Members  of  the  Oxford  and 
Cambridge  Unions,  Edinburgh  Speculative  Society,  and  Durham  Union. 

Further  information  can  be  obtained  by  applying  lo  either  of  the 
Secretaiies.  at  the  Society's  Rooms,  Graduates'  Memorial  Building, 
Trinity  College. 

d 


50*  LlTERAKt    AND   SCIENTIFIC   S0CIKTIK8. 

UNIVERSITY  PHILOSOPHICAL  SOCIETY. 

Founded  1853. 

SESSION  1922-1923. 

President.— 3 .  L.  Woods. 
Secretary.~1.  J.  Millin  (Sch.). 
Treasurer.-J.  Bell  (Sch.,  Sen.  Mod.),  B.A. 
Librarian.— W.  C.  G.  Proctor 
Registrar.— J.  W.  Leebody  (Sch.)- 

Council. 
D.  L.  He.„ing«y,  B.A.  (&■  |  A-^C/iJU-'fi';-  '"■  ''°'-'' 
H.^r'io,t.,  ,Sc.,.),  B.A.   (E.-     A.  S.  Tro,,|..ong^^        „„,  ,_ 

Sec). 
R.  K.  Dickie  (E^-Treas.). 
W.  M'C.  Stewart  (Sch.)  (Ex-Ltb.) 
A.  E.  North. 


B.A. 

0.  G.  Wilde. 

J.  N.  Atkinson,  B.A. 


Associate  Seats  on  Council. 
L.  J.D.  Richardson  (Ex-Sch.,  Sen.  1  G-S.B  Mack  (Sch.,  Sen.  Mod.), 
Mod.),  M.A.,  Univ.  Stud.  (Ex-        B.A.  {Ex-Fics.). 
Pres.).  I 

MEDALS. 
Session  1921-1922. 

'^r-SSl,,  :  ;  fw;sr(^c..„B.A. 

"  .'  J.  L.  Woods. 

Certi^cates  of  Merit,    .        .        .      1  H-^-^-th^^,  B.A. 

There  are  connected  with  the  Society  a  Reading  and  Writing  Room, 
Billiafd  Room!  and  Library.    Boxes  for  Academicals  are  available  for 

''TrRl^ingand'WritingRoom  is  furnished  with  Stationery,  and 
contains  atri'es  of  the  Colfege  Calendars  and  E--matj.n  Pj-s. 
The  leading  newspapers,  reviews,  magazines,  and  other  periodicals 

^t^'Voli^Sng  will  be  held  in  Noven>ber.  Ordinary 
MeeUn^s  ?ak  plafe  n  tL  Debating  Hall,  every  Thursday  Evening 
dmS^Term    f^rom  November  till  June,  when  Papers  are  read  and 

'Tim'Jnd'^rs'^er  Medal  are  offered  annually  in  Composition  "a 
Gold  and  a  Silver  Medal  in  Oratory;  a  Gold  and  a  Silvei  Medal 
fn  History  and  Literature;  and  a  Silver  Medal  in  Esthetics. 

Annual  Subscription, ^^  ^  *• 

Further  information  can  be  obtained  on  application  to  the  Honorarj 
Secretary,  at  the  Rooms  of  the  Society,  Trinity  College. 


LITRKARY    AND    SCIENTIFIC    80CIKTIKS. 


COLLEGE  THEOLOGICAL  SOCIETY. 

Founded  1830. 

SESSION  1922-1923. 

President. 

The  Eev.  the  Regius  Professor  of  Divinity. 


Vice- Pi 

Rev.    Archbishop    King's     Pro- 
fessor of  Divinity. 

Rev.  the  Prof,  of  Biblical  Greek. 

Rev.  the  Professor  of  Ecclesiastical 
History. 

Rev.  the  Prof,  of  Pastoral  Theology. 

Rev.  the  Professor  of  Hebrew. 

Rev.     the     Wallace     Divinity 
Lecturer. 


esidents. 
Rev.  the  Warden  of  the  Divinity 

School  Hostel. 
Rev.     T.     T.     Gray,     M.A., 

S  F  T  C  D 
Rev.   W.  R.  *W.   Roberts,   D.D., 

S.F.T.C.D. 
Rev.  A.  A.Luce,  D.D.,  F.T.C.D. 
Rev.  J.  C.  Forrester,  M.A. 


Auditor. — A.  B.  Lavelle  (Sch.,  Sen.  Mod.),  B.A. 
Secretary. — H.  Turner,  B.Sc. 
Treasurer. — J.  H.  Templeton. 
Librarian. — R.  R.  Walker. 


Committee. 


The  President. 
The  Vice-Presidents. 
The  Officers  of  the  Society. 
The  Ex-Auditor,  Rev.  0.  A.  C. 
Irwin,  B.A. 


J.  G.  MacManaway. 
N.  D.  Emerson  (Sch.). 
T.  H.  Egerton. 
T.  G.  Rochfort-Wade. 


AWARDS. 
SESSION  1921-1922. 
L  Silver  Me.lal.— L.  W.  Martin  (Scb.,  Sen.  Mod.),  B.A. 
Oratory,  \  Special  Certificate. — A.  B.  Lavelle  (Sch.,  Sen.  Mod.), 

(      B.A. 
-.  ...  f  Silver  Meda'i. — J.  H.  Templeton. 

Composxlmi,     \  gp^^j^j  Certificate. -H.  Turner. 

President's  Prize  Essay. — J.  W.  E.  Dawson,  B.A. 

All  Graduates  and  Undergraduates  are  eligible  for  ordinary  member- 
ship, who  are  Members  of  the  Divinity  School,  or  intend  to  become 
Students  in  Divinity. 

Annual  Subscription,  .         .         .         .     7«.  6rf. 
Entrance  Fee, 2*.  6rf. 

Silver  Medals  are  annually  given  for  Oratory  and  Written  Composi- 
tion. The  President  also  gives  a  Prize  for  an  Essay  on  a  given  subject. 
The  Opening  Meeting  of  the  Session  is  held  on  the  first  or  second 
Monday  in  November.  Ordinary  Meetings  are  held  on  Mondays 
during  Divinity  Term,  at  3  o'clock,  when  Papers  are  read  and 
discussed  by  members.  The  Society  possesses  a  valuable  Library 
of  Theological  books.  Further  information  regarding  the  Society  can 
be  obtained  on  applictation  to  the  Honorary  Secretary,  at  Graduates' 
Memorial  Buildings,  Trinity  College. 


62* 


LITERARY  ANT)  SCIENTIFIC  90CIRTIES. 


UNIVERSITY  BIOLOGICAl.  ASSOCIATION. 

(Founded  1873.) 

SESSION  1922-1923. 

President— ^\  Pearson,  M.D.,  F.R. C.S.I. 

Record  Secretary — J.  E.  Deale. 
Corresponding  Secretary — F.  J.  Henry. 
Treasurer — L.  E.  J.  Werner. 
Assistant  Treasurer — E.  F.  C.  Earl. 
Librarian — W.  F.  Whaley. 

Council :  above  with — 


T.  M.  May. 

W.  A.  Taylor. 

J.  K.  S.  Thompson,  B..-\. 

W.  J.  A.  MacMahon. 

J.  F.  Wilde. 

E.  A.  Bennett. 

E.  E,  Satchwell. 


al 
the 


A.  A.  M'Conn(i)l,  M.B.,  F.R.C.S.l. 
G.  r.  Meldon,M.D.,  F.R.C.S.l. 
Bethel  Solomons,  M.D.,  1<'.R.C.P.I, 
T.  0.  Graham,  M.D.,  F.R.C.S.l. 
J.  Speares,  M.D.,  F.R.C.IM. 
J.  C.  Earl. 
11.  T.  Jackson. 
R.  H.  Micks,  B.A. 

The  object  of  the  Association  is  the  encouragement  of  Origin 
Investigation  in  Biology,  including  Pathology,  Therapeutics,  and  tl 
allied  Sciences.    • 

All  past  and  present  Members  of  the  University  taking  an  interest  in 
Science  or  Medicine  are  eligible  for  Membership. 

Meetings,  at  which  Papers  are  read,  and  objects  of  interest — 
Microscopic  and  otherwise — are  exhibited,  are  held,  two  each  month, 
from  November  to  April.     Tea  at  8  p.m.     Chair  taken  at  8.15  p.m. 

A  Silver  Medal  is  awarded  at  the  close  of  the  Session  for  the  most 
meritorious  Paper  read  at  any  of  the  Ordinary  Meetings  of  the  .Associa- 
tion. All  Members  shall  be  qualified  to  compete  who,  at  the  date  of 
reading  such  Paper,  shall  not  have  taken  their  full  qualifications  in 
Medicine  and  Surgery. 

Members  desiring  to  read  Papers,  or  to  exhibit  objects  of  interest,  are 
requested  to  communicate  with  the  Corresponding  Secretary. 

Members  may  introduce  two  Visitors  at  any  Ordinary  Meeting. 

Annual  Subscription,  Five  Shillings.     No  Entrance  Fee. 


LlTKKAKf    AND   SCIENTIFIC  SOCIETIES.  53* 

UNIVERSITY  EXPERIMENTAL  SCIENCE  ASSOCIATION. 

SESSION   1922-1923, 

Patron — The  Provost. 

'  Preiident—^yAney  Young,  Sc.D.,  F.R.S. 

Vice- Presidents . 


Sydney  Young,  Sc.D.,  F.R.S. 

Harry  Thrift,  M.A.,  F.T.C.D. 

W.  R.  G.  Atkins,  Sc.D. 

J.  T.  Jackson,  M.A.,  M.A.I. 

L.  B.  Smyth,  Sc.B. 

W.  Tatlow,  M.A.,  B  A.I. 

Mrs.  Cecil  Thompson,  M.A. 

W.   R.   Fearon,    M.A.,  Sc.D., 


E.  P.Culverwell,  M.A.,  S.F.T.C.D 
J.  Joly,  Sc.D.,  F.R.S.,  F.T.C.D. 
W.  G.  Smith,  M.D. 
E.  A.  Werner,  Sc.D.,  F.C.S.  ,F.I.C 
W.  E.  Thrift,  M.A.,  F.T.C.D. 
M.  W.  J.  Fry,  M.A.,  F.T.C.D. 
H.  H.  Dixon,  Sc.D.,  F.R.S. 
Rev.  W.  R.  W.   Roberts,   D.D., 

S.F.T.C.D.  I        F.T.C.D 

J.  R.  Cotter,  M.A.  1     W.  C.  Rainsden,  M.A. 

Hon.  Jleeord  Secretary— Qhidys  Moss,  6,  T.C.D. 

Hon.  Correspondence  Secretary — W.  Maitland,  B.A.,  Cham.  Lab 

Hon.  Treasurer — J.  W.  Leebody  (Sch.). 

Hon.  Librarian — G.  Fitzgibbon  (Sch.). 
Council. 

!L.  May  Brooks  (Sch.),  Ex-Eon.  Ree,  See. 
P.  K.  Dixon  (Sch.),  Ez-Hon.  Corres.  Sec. 
R.  K.  Dickie,  Ex- Hon.  Treas. 
K.  C.  Bailey  (Sch.),  B.A.,  Ex-Hon.  Lib. 


J.  Bell  (Sch.),  B.A. 
W.  Holmes  (Sch.). 
G.  Griffen  (Sch.). 


F.  W.  Brambell  (Sch.). 

H.  Turner,  B.Sc. 

A.  C.  Williams  (Sch.),  B.A. 


The  object  of  the  Association  is  the  encouragement  of  investigation 
in  all  branches  of  Experimental  Science. 

General  Meetings  are  held  at  intervals  during  Term,  for  reading 
Papers  and  exhibiting  Experiments,  in  the  Physical  Laboratory, 
Trinity  College,  Dublin.  The  Chair  is  taken  at  8  p.m.,  tea  being 
provided  by  the  Association  at  each  Meeting.  Members  have  the 
privilege  of  bringing  one  guest  to  each  General  Meeting. 

This  Association  and  the  University  Biological  Association  jointly 
possess  an  Electric  Lantern  and  Projecting  Microscope  (obtained  at  a 
cost  of  about  £150,  which  was  defrayed  by  private  subscription  aided 
by  a  College  Grant).  Lantern  Exhibitions,  open  to  all  Students  oi 
Trinity  College,  are  held  at  short  intervals  during  Term.  They  com- 
mence at  8  o'clock. 

The  Association  possesses  a  Library  in  the  Physical  Laboratory, 
which  includes  M'orks  on  Medicine  and  Engineering  as  well  as  on 
Experimental  and  Natural  Sciences,  and  which  may  be  borrowed  on 
application  to  the  Hon.  liibrarian.  A  number  of  Scientific  and  .Medical 
Journals  are  subscribed  to,  and  may  be  consulted  in  the  Library.  In 
conjunction  with  the  University  Biological  Association,  the  Association 
also  possesses  a  Reading  Room  in  the  Graduates'  Memorial  Building. 

All  Graduates  as  well  as  Undergraduates  of  the  University  are  eligible 
for  Membership.  The  Annual  Subscription  is  5«.  No  Entrance  Fee. 
Prizes  are  offered  annually  for  Papers  given  by  Junior  Members. 
Further  information  may  be  obtained  on  application  to  any  of  the 
officers. 

d2 


64* 


LITERARY    AND    SCIENTIFIC   SOCIETIES. 


DUBLIN  UNIVERSITY  ENGINEERING  STUDENTS'  SOCIETY. 

President. 
David  Clark,  B.Sc. 


Vice- Presidents-. 
The  Provost. 


Francis  Bergin,  B.A.,  B.A.I. 
John  Eraser,  M.A.,  F.T.C.D. 
Sir  John  P.  Griffith,  M.A.I. 
G.  M.  Harriss,  M.Inst.E.E. 
Arthur  Hassard,  B.A.,  M.A.I. 
J.  T.  Jackson,  M.A.,  M.A.I. 
John  Joly,  Sc.D.,  F.R.S.,  F.T.C.D, 
Thomas  Alexander,  M.A.I. 


W.  Kave-Parry,  M.A.,  B.A.I. 
W.  E.  Lilly,  M.A.I. ,  Sc.D. 
11.  A.  P.  Rogers,  M.A.,  F.T.C.D, 
William  Tatlow,  M.A.,  B.A.I. 
W.  E.  Thrift,  M.A.,  F.T.C.D. 
E.  F.  C.  Trench,  M.A.,  B.A.I. 
E.  A.  Werner,  Sc.D.,  F.C.S. 
Sydney  Young,  Sc.D.,  F.R.S. 


Son.  Correspondence  Secretary. 
G.  F.  Waters. 

Hon,  Record  Secretary. 
G.  M.  Eccles. 

Hon.  Treasurer. 
R.  K.  Dickie. 


Committee. 


R.  H.  Owens. 
T.  W.  Moran. 

E.  C.  Classon. 
H.  D.  Bereslord. 

W.  E.  Robb. 
J.  E.  C.  Lawlor. 


Senior  Class. 
Middle  Class. 
Junior  Class. 


The  object  of  the  Society  is  the  discussion  of  subjects  of  Professional 
interest.     Prizes  are  awarded  annually  in  each  Class. 

Meetings  are  held  once  a  forlnight  in  the  Engineering  School  Build* 
ings  for  the  reading  of  Papers.     Chair  taken  at  8  p.m. 

All  Students  of  the  School  of  Engineering  are  eligible  for  Member- 
ship. 

Further  information  can  be  had  from  any  of  the  Officers  of  the 
Society. 


Lll'KKARY  AND  SCIKNTIKIC  80C1KTIE8.  55* 


UNIVERSITY  OP  DUBLIN  CHORAL  SOCIETY. 

(Founded  Novembbk,  1837.) 

Patron. 
His  Majesty  the  King. 

Vice- Patron. 
The  Earl  of  Iveagh,  LL.D.,  K.P.,  Chancellor  of  the  University. 

President. 
The  Provost. 

Tice-Preiiidents. 
The  Rt.   Hon.  William   Drennan       Sir  Robert  Woods,  M.Ch.,  M.P. 

Andrews,  LL.D.  J.  R.  Scott,  B.A.,  D.L. 

The    Rt.  Hon.    D.    H.    Madden,        The    Rt.    Hon.    Mr.   Justice 

LL.D.  Samuels,  LL.D, 

Committee.— Season  1922-1923. 


The  Junior  Dean  of  Trinity  College 

{Ex-offlcio). 
John  L.  Woods,  Hon.  Sec. 
R.  T.  Cherry,  B.A.,  Hon.  Treas. 
A.  E.  C.  Trimble,  Hon.  Lib.  and 


0.  Willis,  Eon.  Orch.  Reg. 

T.  Fred.  Figgis,  LL.D. 

H.  P.  Mayne,  B.A.  {Ex-Treas). 

E.  F.  S.  Morrison. 

A.  K.  Duff,  B.A.,   Mus.B. 


Auditor! . 
Robert  Macalister,  LL.D.  |    T.  Henry  Maxwell,  LL.D. 

Conductor. 
George  H.  P.  Hewson,  B.A.,  Mus.Doc. 

Season. — Octobeii,  1922,  to  June,  1923. 

Members  of  the  Band  meet  for  Practice  on  Thursday,  and  Members 
of  the  Chorus  on  Friday,  both  at  4  o'clock.  Evening  Practices  are  also 
held  duiing  Term  time. 

Subscription  : — Performing  Member,  .  . 
Non-Performing  Member, 
Lady  Associate,  .  .  . 
Orchestral  Associate,  .  . 
Non-performing  Associate, 

All  persons  who  have  entered  the  University  of  Dublin,  of  Oxford,  or 
of  Cambridge,  are  eligible  for  Membership. 

Further  information  may  be  obtained  from  the  Hon.  Sec,  Committee 
Rooms,  No.  4,  Trinity  College,  on  Practice  Days. 


£1     1 

0  per  annum 

I   10 

0 

1     0 
0  15 
0  10 

0         „ 
6        „ 

56*  LlTl!;KAKY    AND    SCIKNTIFIC    SOClKTIEs. 

COLLEGE  CLASSICAL  SOCIETY. 

Pounded  1906. 

SESSION  1922-23. 

Patron. 
flight  Hon.  Dodgaon  Hamilton  Madden,  LL.D.,  Litt.D. 

Vice' Patrons. 

Rev.  T.  T.  Gray,  M.A.,  S.F.T.C.D. 
Right  Hon.  Sir  John  Ross,  Bart.,  LL.D. 

President. 
L.  C.  Purser,  Litt.D.,  S.F.T.C.D. 

Officers. 

Auditor. — W.  A.  Laidlaw  (Sch.). 
Secretary. — A.  W.  Bayne  (Sch.). 
Treasurer, — A.  D.  Pringle  (Sch.). 
Librarian. — L.  G.  P.  Freer  (Sch.). 


Council. 


L.  J.  D.  Richardson  (Sch.,  Sen. 

Mod..  Univ.  Stud.),  B.A. 
W.  Beare  (Sch.),  Ex- Auditor. 
G.  S.  B.  Mack  (Sch.,  Sen.  Mod.), 

B.A. 


E.  C.  Micks. 

G.  A.  Duncan  (Sch.). 

H.  C.  Baker. 

M.  C.  Dronigoole. 


This  Societ)'  has  been  established  for  the  promotion  of  Classical  study, 
and  especially  of  original  work.  It  possesses  a  considerable  Lending 
Library  in  the  Graduates'  Memorial  Building  for  the  use  of  Members, 
consisting  of  texts,  the  best-known  editions,  books  of  reference,  and 
general  works  on  the  history  and  literature  of  Greece  and  Rome,  and 
including  almost  all  books  prescribed  in  the  Classical  Course. 

Meetings  are  held  on  each  Friday  evening  in  Lecture  Term  :  at  these 
meetings  Essays  are  read,  followed  by  a  discussion  of  any  original  or 
interesting  view  that  arises.  Lantern  evenings  are  also  held  at  intervals. 
Prizes  are  offered  for  the  best  Essays  read  during  the  year,  and  for  sets 
of  compositions  and  translations. 

The  Annual  Subsciiption  is  7s.  6rf.  for  Members  of  Freshman  standing ; 
10s.  for  all  other  Members. 


LITKRARY    AND    SCIKNTIFIC   SOCIETIKS.  57* 

UNIVERSITY  ELIZABETHAN  SOCIETY. 

FouxnED  1905. 

SESSION  1922-1923. 

President. 
Mrs.  Madden. 

Correspondence  Secretary. 
Eileen  Brunskill. 

lieeord  Secretary. 

Lorna  Tweedy. 

Treasurer. 

Hazel  Homsby  (Scb.)> 

Assistant  Treasurer. 

Adelaide  Robb. 

Librarian 
Molly  Meade. 

Committee. 


House- Officer 
Nora  Dunn. 


"  EX'Officio  " — Gladys  Moss  {Ex-Correspondence  iiec.). 
Mrs.  Dockereli,  B.A. 
Nancy  Kelly. 
Murjoiie  MauBride. 
Alice  Brown. 
Grace  Price. 
D,  Pearson. 
Edna  Fitz Henry. 

There  are  connected  with  the  Society  a  Reading  and  Writing  Room, 
a  small  Library,  and  a  Lunch  Room,  where  lunch  may  be  obtained. 
Stationery  is  provided,  and  the  leading  newspapers,  reviews,  magazines, 
and  other  periodicals  are  taken  by  the  Society. 

Meetings  for  Debate  are  held  four  times  a  term. 

All  Women  Students  of  the  University  are  eligible  as  Members  of  the 
Society. 

Further  information  can  be  obtained  by  applying  to  either  of  the 
Secretaries,  at  the  Society's  Rooms,  6,  Trinity  College. 


58*  LITERABY   AND    SCIENTIFIC    SOCIETIES. 

TfilNITY  COLLEGE  CHURCH   MUSICAL  ASSOCIATION. 

1922-23. 

President. 
Rev.  J.  C.  Forrester,  M.A. 

Ohoirmaster. 
Rev.  J.  P.  Shoitt,  M.A. 

Organist  and  Honorary  Secretary. 
W.  A.  Packliam. 

Honorary  Treasurer. 
T.  H.  Egerton. 

Honorary  Secretary  for  Women  Students. 
Dorothy  McFarlane. 

Honorary  Treasurer  for  Women  Students. 
Evelyn  M.  Clarke. 

Honorary  Librarian. 
C.  F.  Allen. 


Committee. 


H.  T.  Cotter. 
G.  F.  Mann. 
R.  E.  Devlin. 


H.  Lamb. 
Doris  Bohane. 
Ivy  V.  Spielinan. 


The  object  of  the  Association  is  the  encouragement  of  the  study  of 
Church  Music  amongst  Students,  and  especially  amongst  Divinity 
Students,  to  enable  tliem  later  to  take  an  active  interest  in  the  Music 
of  their  Parish  Churches. 

The  Choirmaster  of  the  College  gives  instruction  in  part-singing  on 
two  days  in  each  week  (Friday,  at  12  noon  [men),  and  1  p.m.  [tvomen), 
and  on  Tuesday,  at  2.30  p.m.)  in  Michaelmas  and  Hilary  Teims. 
During  these  Terms  Evensong  is  sung  on  Tuesdays,  at  3.45  p.m., 
the  Members  of  the  Association  forming  the  Choir. 

Individual  instruction  in  intoning  is  also  given  during  Trinity  Terij 
to  any  Members  who  desire  it. 

Certificates  are  granted  to  Members  who  regularly  attend  the  Service 
and  Practices  for  three  Terms,  and  pass  a  satisfactory  Examination  i^ 
Church  Music  in  Trinity  Term. 

Annual  Subscription,  One  Shilling. 


LITKHARV    AND   SCIENTIFIC  S0CIKTIK8. 


5y* 


NEOPHYTE  DEBATING  SOCIETY. 
1922-23. 

President. 
J.  M.  Henry,  M.A.,  F.T.C.D. 


Vice-Presidents. 


E.  H.  Alton,  M.A.,  F.T.C.D. 
J.  Johnston,  M.A.,  F.T.C.D. 
B.  0.  Waller  (Sch.,  Sen.  Mod.), 

B.A. 
L.  J.  D.  Eichardson  (Sch.,  Sen. 

Mod.),  B.A.,  Univ.  Stud. 
H.  M.  0.  White  (Ex-Sch.,  Sen. 

Mod.),  B.A. 
Rev.    W.   0.    de    Pauley   (Sen. 
Mod.),  B.A. 


T.   C.    Kiiigsmill  Moore  (Sch., 

Sen.  Mod.),  B.A. 
W.   H.   B.   Mack  (Sch.,   Sen. 

Mod.),  B.A. 
J.   C.    Donaldson    (Sch.,    Sen. 

Mod.),  B.A. 
J.  V.   Bateman    (Sen.    Mod.), 

B.A. 
B.  St.  J.  Gulvin  (Sch.),  B.A. 


Hon.  Secretary, 
D.  St.  Clair  Mackenzie. 


Committee. 


R.  K.  Dickie,  Ex-Sec. 
F.  M.  O'Connor. 
E.  E.  Satchwell. 
V.  D.  Keirans. 


F.  D.  MacCarthy-Morrogh. 

E.  V.  Goff. 

T.  J.  JoMnston  (Sch.). 


Medals. 

Silver  Medal  in  Oratory  (1921-22)— D.  St.  Clair  Mackenzie. 

The  Society  was  founded  to  afiEord  Freshmen  practice  in  speaking, 
and  so  act  as  a  sort  of  training-ground  for  the  Senior  Debating 
Societies. 

Meetings  are  held  in  No.  22  on  Mondays  during  Michaelmas  and 
Hilary  Terms.     The  Chair  is  taken  at  8  p.m. 

Students  below  Senior  Sophister  standing  are  eligible  for  Member- 
ship, and  become  Members  on  payment  of  the  Subscription  (2«.  6</.)  to 
the  Hon.  Secretary. 

A  Silver  Medal  is  awarded  annually  in  Oratory. 


THE 

DUBLIN  UNIVEESITY  CALENDAR 


Jutrubwrtion. 

UNIVERSITY  OF  DUBLIN,  TRINITY  COLLEGE. 

§  I.  Thk  University  of  Ddbmn  was  founded  by  Queen  Elizabeth, 
A.D.  1591.     On  the  third  day  of  March  in  that  year,  a  College  was 


Holy 
Elizabeth.'"" 

Previous  to  the  year  1873,  the  Provostship,  Fellowships,  and 
Foundation  Scholarships  of  Trinity  CoUej^e  could  only  be  held  by 
Members  of  the  Church  of  Ireland.  This  restriction  was  sanc- 
tioned by  Parliamentary  enactments  in  the  case  of  the  Provostship 
and  Fellowships  (33  Geo.  III.  c.  21),  With  regard  to  the 
Foundation  Scholarships,  the  limitation  arose  solely  from  certain 
provisions"  in  the  College  Statutes.  All  these  restrictions  were 
removed  by  the  Act  36  Vict.  c.  21.  The  preamble  to  this 
Act  recites  that  it  is  expedient  "that  the  benefits  of  Trinity 
College,  and  the  University  of  Dublin,  and  of  the  schools  in  the 
said  University,  as  places  of  religion  and  learning,  should  be  ren- 
dered freely  accessible  to  the  nation,"  and  that  all  restrictions, 
tests,  and  disabilities  should  be  removed. 

§  II. — GovEBNMENT.— Subject  to  the  control  of  Acts  of  Parlia- 
ment and  Royal  Statutes,  the  government  is  in  the  hands  of 
the  Board,  in  conjunction  with  the  Visitors,  but  in  most  matters 
relating  to  education,  as  specified  in  detail  below,  it  acts  con- 
jointly with  the  Council,  and  in  matters  relating  to  the  conferring 
of  Degrees,  the  sanction  of  the  Senate  is  required. 

*  "Unum  CoUepium  mater  Universltatis  . .  .  pro  educatione,  institutione  et  instruc- 
tione  juvenum  et  studentium  in  aitibus  et  facultatibus,  perpetuis  futuris  temporibus 
duraturum,  et  quod  erit  et  vocabitiir  Collegium  Sanctse  et  Individuse  Trinitatis,  juxta 
Dublin,  a  serenissima  Uegina  Elizabetlia  fundatum."— CAarte  Reg.  Eliz,  anno  regni 
Iricesimo  quarto.  ,  ,  _  „...„., 

b  For  an  account  of  the  various  Charters  and  Royal  Letters  affecting  Tnnity  Collego 
see  "  Statuta  ColleRii  .itaue  Universitaiis  Dubliniensis." 


2  IHTKODUCXIOK. 

The  Board  consists  of  the  Provost  and  seven  Senior  Fellows, 
and  the  Fellows,  if  any,  other  than  Senior  Fellows,  who  may  be 
elected  by  the  Board  to  the  office  of  Bursar,  Senior  Lecturer, 
or  Itegistrar,  together  with  two  representatives  of  the  Junior 
Fellows,  and  two  representatives  of  the  Profeesors. 

The  VisiTOHS  are  the  .Chancellor  of  the  University  (or,  in  his 
absence,  the  Vice-Chancellor)  and  the  Lord  Chief  Justice  of 
Ireland. 

The  Senate,  or  Public  Congregation,  of  the  University,  consists 
of  the  Chancellor,  or,  in  his  absence,  oLthe  Vice-Chancellor,  or 
Pro-Vice-Chancellor  for  the  time  being,  and  such  Doctors  or 
Masters  of  the  University  as  keep  their  names  on  the  books  o 
the  College  in  accordance  with  such  regulations  as  the  Board 
may  enact.    (See  p.  23.) 

The  Caput  of  the  Senate  consists  of  the  Chancellor,  or  Vice- 
Chancellor,  or  Pro- Vice-Chancellor,  the  Provost,  or,  in  his 
absence,  the  Vice-Provost,  and  the  Senior  Master  non-regent, » 
who  is  elected  by  the  Senate. 

The  Senate  is  convened  only  by  the  Chancellor,  or,  in  his 
absence,  the  Vice-Chancellor  or  Pro- Vice- Chancellor,  each  of 
whom,  when  presiding,  has  power  to  adjourn  or  dissolve  its 
meetings,  and  has  a  casting  vote.  The  Chancellor,  or  in  his 
absence,  the  Vice-Chancellor  or  Pro- Vice-  Chancellor,  is  bound  to 
convene  the  Senate,  on  a  requisition  presented  to  him  by  the 
Board,  and  the  Senate  shall  meet  at  such  time,  and  for  such 
purpose,  as  shall  be  stated  in  such  requisition. 

Whenever  the  office  of  Chancellor  becomes  vacant,  the  Board 
must,  within  one  calendar  month,  propose  to  the  Senate  the 
names  of  three  persons,  from  amongst  whom  the  Senate  must 
elect  a  Chancellor  within  one  month  from  the  da:j-  of  such 
proposal.  In  computing  these  periods,  the  interval  between 
the  1st  of  July  and  1st  of  October  shall  not  be  taken  into  account, 
nor  shall  an  election  take  place  during  such  interval.  If  the 
Senate  decline  or  omit  to  elect,  the  nomination  of  the  Chancellor 
passes  to  the  Crown.  The  Vice-Chancellor  continues  to  hold 
his  office  during  the  vacancy  of  the  office  of  Chancellor,  and, 
during  such  vacancy,  has  power  to  convene  the  Senate  for  the 
purpose  of  electing  a  Chancellor,  and  has  authority  to  exercise  all 
the  functions  and  duties  of  the  Chancellor,  until  the  election  of 
the  Chancellor. 

The  Vice-Chancellor,  if  unable  to  attend  any  of  the  meetings 
of  the  Senate,  is  empowered,  by  writing  under  his  hand  and  seal, 
to  appoint  a  Pro- Vice-Chancellor  for  that  special  occasion. 

The  Board  has  power  to  alter,  amend,  and  repeal  all  laws, 
rules,  or  by-laws  heretofore  existing,  and  to  make  new  rules  and 

•Each  Master  in  Arts  is  called  a  regent  durinR  the  three  years  following  the  time  he 
took  that  Dejtree.  Tlie  name  originated  from  the  duty  formerly  imposed  on  such 
Masters  of  regulating  the  disputations  of  the  Schools. 


INTRODUCTIOK .  6 

laws,  from  time  to  time,  for  the  more  solemn  confernng  of  Degrees 
by  the  Senate ;  provided  always  that  no  such  new  laws,  or 
alteration  of  existing  laws,  shall  be  of  force  or  binding  upon  the 
University,  until  they  shall  have  received  the  sanction  of  the 
Senate  lawfully  assembled. 

No  law,  rule,  by-law,  or  grace  whatsoever,  for  the  conferring 
of  Degrees,  or  any  other  purpose,  can  be  proposed  to  the  Senate, 
which  has  not  been  first  proposed  to  and  adopted  by  the  Board. 
The  Chancellor  or  Vice- Chancellor  presiding  is  empowered  to 
prohibit  any  such  law  or  grace  from  being  proposed  to  the 
Senate. 

Gowns  are  worn  at  meetings  of  the  Senate. 

The  Council  consists  of  the  following  members : — The  Provost, 
or,  in  his  absence,  the  Vice-Provost ;  the  Senior  Lecturer;  the 
Registrar ;  and  sixteen  members  of  the  Senate,  namely ; — two 
elected  by  the  Board ;  six  elected  by  all  of  the  Junior  Fellows 
and  those  of  the  Professors  andof  the  King's  Professors  appointed 
to  lecture  or  examine  in  the  Schools  in  Arts  as  hereinafter 
defined;  one  elected  by  those  of  the  Junior  Fellows  and  Professors 
appointed  to  lecture  or  examine  in  the  School  of  Law;  two  elected 
by  those  of  the  Junior  Fellows  and  Professors  appointed  to  lecture 
or  examine  in  the  School  of  Physic  ;  one  elected  by  those  of  the 
Junior  Fellows  and  Professors  appointed  to  lecture  or  examine  in 
the  School  of  Engineering;  four  members  elected  by  all  the 
members  of  the  Senate. 

The  Scliools  in  Arts  consist  of  the  following  Schools,  viz.: — 
The  School  of  Mathematics,  the  School  of  Classics,  the  School  of 
Hebrew  and  Oriental  Languages,  the  School  of  Mental  and  Moral 
Science,  the  School  of  Experimental  Science,  the  School  of  Natural 
Science,  the  School  of  History  and  Political  Science,  the  School 
of  Modern  Languages  and  Literature,  the  School  of  Legal  and 
Political  Science,  the  School  of  Celtic  Languages,  and  such  other 
Schools  in  Arts  as  may  hereafter  from  time  to  time  be 
established. 

The  Council  nominates  to  all  Professorships,  except  those  the 
nomination  to  which  is  vested  in  some  other  body  or  persons  by 
Act  of  Parliament,  or  by  the  directions  of  private  founders, 
and  except  also  the  Professorships  in  the  School  of  Divinity.  Such 
nomination  is  subject  to  the  approval  of  the  Board.  In  the  event  of 
the  Hoard  refusing  its  approval  to  the  nomination  of  the  Council, 
the  Chancellor  decides  whether  the  grounds  for  such  refusal  are 
sufficient.  If  they  appear  to  him  to  be  insufficient,  he  declares 
the  person  nominated  by  the  Council  to  be  duly  elected.  If  not, 
the  Council  proceeds  to  a  fresh  nomination.  If  no  election  shall 
take  place  within  the  space  of  six  calendar  months  from  the  date 
of  the  vacancy,  or  from  the  time  of  the  creation  of  any  new  Pro- 
fessorship, the  light  of  nomination  and  election  for  the  purpose  of 

B  2 


4  IITTEODUCXION. 

filling  up  such  vacancy,  or  of  appointing  to  such  new  Professor- 
ship, lapses  to  the  Chancellor.  No  person,  being  at  the  time  a 
member  of  the  Council,  shall  be  nominated  by  the  Council  to  any 
Professorship. 

Except  so  far  as  is  otherwise  provided  by  Act  of  Parliament,  or 
by  direction  of  private  founders,  any  proposed  new  rules  or  regu- 
lations respecting  studies,  lectures,  and  examinations  (other  than 
those  connected  with  the  School  of  Divinity,  with  which  the  Council 
has  no  authority  to  interfere),  and  also  any  proposed  new  rules 
or  regulations  respecting  the  qualifications,  duties,  and  tenure  of 
office  of  any  Professor  in  any  Professorship  now  existing,  or  here- 
after to  be  constituted,  except  the  Professors  and  Professorships 
connected  with  the  said  School  of  Divinity,  and  any  proposed 
alterations  in  any  existing  rules  or  regulations  respecting  such 
studies,  lectures,  and  examinations,  qualifications,  duties,  and 
tenure  of  office,  save  as  aforesaid,  require  the  approval  both  of  the 
Board,  and  of  the  Council. 

All  such  new  rules  and  regulations  and  alterations  in  any  rules 
or  regulations  may  be  originated  either  by  the  Board,  or  by  the 
Council. 

No  new  Professorship  can  be  created  or  founded  by  the  Board 
without  the  consent  of  the  Council. 

§  III.  Teaching. — The  Examining  Staffconsists  of  the  Provost, 
Fellows,  and  Professors. 

The  Lecturing  Stafi"  consists  of  the  Junior  Fellows  and  Pro- 
fessors. 

The  greater  part  of  the  teaching  in  the  obligatory  Courses  in  Arts 
is  performed  by  the  Junior  Fellows.  To  Professors  selected  from 
among  them  is  entrusted  for  the  most  part  the  instruction  which 
is  given  in  the  highest  departments  of  these  Courses.  Special 
Lecturers  are  selected  to  lecture  Candidates  for  Honors. 

From  the  early  Statutes  it  would  seem  to  have  been  originally 
intended  that  the  Fellows  should  carry  on  the  special  instruction 
required  by  Students  desirous  of  qualifying  themselves  for  par- 
ticular Professions.  But  the  growing  requirements  of  the  Profes- 
sional Schools,  especially  the  Medical,  prevented  this  design  from 
being  carried  out,  and  the  special  instruction  required  for  the 
Professional  Schools  of  Divinity,  Law,  Medicine,  Engineering, 
and  Agriculture  is  now,  for  the  most  part,  delivered  by  Professors 
elected  to  teach  special  subjects. 

Outside  the  regular  Courses  in  Arts,  and  the  branches  of  study 
required  in  the  Professional  Schools,  there  are  various  departments 
of  learning  for  the  cultivation  of  which  Professorships  have  been 
from  time  to  time  founded. 

§  IV.  Dkgrkes  are  publicly  conferred  by  the  Chancellor  or  Vice- 
Ohancellor,  in  the  Senate  or  Congregation  of  the  University. 
Thfc  Grace  of  the  House  for  a  Degree  in  any  Faculty  having 


iNtRODDCTTOlT.  5 

Hrst  been  granted  by  the  Board,  miist  pass  the  Caput  before  it 
can  be  proposed  to  the  rest  of  the  Senate,  and  each  member  of 
the  Caput  has  a  negative  voice.  If  no  member  ot  the  Caput 
objects,  the  Proctor,  in  a  prescribed  form  of  words,  supplicates 
the  Congregation  for  their  public  Grace;  and,  having  collected 
their  suffrages,  declares  the  assent  or  dissent  of  the  House 
accordingly;  if  the  placets  be  the  majority,  the  Candidates 
for  Degrees  are  presented  to  the  Senate  by  the  Regius  Professor 
of  the  Faculty  in  which  the  Degree  is  to  be  taken  ;  or,  if  it  be  a 
Degree  in  Arts,  by  one  of  the  Proctors:  they  then  advance  in 
order  before  the  Chancellor,  who  confers  the  Degree  according 
to  a  formula  fixed  by  the  University  Statutes,"  and  after  which 
the  Candidates  then  subscribe  their  names  in  the  Register. 

Public  Commencements  for  the  conferring  of  Degrees  are  held 
four  times  in  each  year  on  days  published  in  the  Almanac.  A 
Diploma  is  sometimes  given  to  those  Avho  are  fully  qualified  for  a 
Degree,  but  whose  circumstances  may  render  it  inconvenient  for 
them  to  wait  for  the  public  Comitia;  but  such  persons  can  exercise 
none  of  the  rights  and  privileges  connected  with  their  Degree  until 
they  have  appeared  at  Commencements,  and  have  had  the  Degree 
publicly  conferred  on  them  by  the  Chancellor  or  Vice-Chancellor. 
An  exception  to  this  rule  may  be  made  in  favour  of  candidates  when 
the  circumstances  which  prevent  their  appearing  in  person  are  of 
a  sufficiently  grave  or  exceptional  nature.     (See  page  16.) 

A  meeting  of  the  Senate  for  the  consideration  of  names  pro- 
posed for  Honorary  Degrees  is  held  at  the  end  of  Hilary  Term,  to 
which  attention  is  called  a  week  before  by  notice  on  the  College 
gate. 

The  following  Regulations  with  regard  to  the  order  to  be 
observed  in  conferring  Degrees  at  the  Public  Commencements 
have  been  sanctioned  by  the  Vice-Chancellor : — 

I.  The  Chancellor  announces  the  opening  of  tlie  Comitia.  At 
the  Winter  Codfhienceraents  the  Senior  Master  non-regent  is  elected, 
on  the  proposition  of  the  Chancellor  and  the  Provost ;  and  the  two 
Proctors  and  the  Registrar  make  the  statutory  affirmation. 

II.  The  Senior  Proctor  supplicates  for  the  Licenses  in  Medicine, 
in  Surgery,  and  in  Engineering.  The  Junior  Proctor  supplicates 
for  the  Degrees  of  Bachelors  in  Arts.  The  Senior  Proctor  suppli- 
cates for  tlie  other  ordinary  Degrees. 

III.  The  Senior  Lecturer  introduces  the  Moderators  to  the 
Chancellor,  who  presents  them  with  their  Medals.  The  Senior 
Lecturer  introduces  the  Respondents  to  the  Chancellor,  who 
presents  them  with  their  Certificates. 


*  See  the  forms  of  presentation  and  supnlication,  and  also  the  fomis  of  suspension  and 
absolution,  in  tlie  Univereity  Statutes.— iSmf.  Univ.  after  cap.  xi.  The  fonns  for  con- 
ferring Degrees  are  given  in  cap.  v. 


6 


INTRODUCTION. 


IV.  Licences  in  Medicine,  in  Surgery,  and  in  Engineering  are 
conferred. 

V.  Candidates  for  Honorary  Degrees  are  presented  to  tlie  (Senate 
and  admitted  by  the  Cliancellor. 

VI.  Candidates  for  Ordinary  Degrees  are  presented  and  ad- 
mitted. Candidates  in  Arts  are  presented  by  the  Proctors  :  other 
Candidates  by  the  Professors  of  tlieir  respective  faculties.  In 
presenting  the  Candidates  the  following  order  is  observed  : — 


Baclielors  in  Music  who  are 
not  Graduates  in  Arts. 

Doctors  in  Music  who  are  not 
Graduates  in  Arts. 

Bachelors  in  Arts. 

Bachelors  in  Agriculture. 

Bachelors  in  Science. 

Bachelors  ii\  Dental  Science. 

Bachelors  in  Music  who  are 
Graduates  in  Arts. 

Bachelors  in  Engineering. 

Bachelors  in  Obstetric  Science. 

Bachelors  in  Surgery. 

Bachelors  in  Medicine. 

Bachelors  in  Laws. 


13.  Masters  in  Dental  Science. 

14.  Masters  in  Engineering. 

15.  Masters  in  Obstetric  Science. 

16.  Masters  in  Surgery. 

17.  Masters  in  Arts. 

18.  Baclielors  in  Divinity. 

19.  Doctors    in    Music    who    are 

Graduates  in  Arts. 

20.  Doctors  in  Pliilosophy. 

21.  Doctors  in  Science. 

22.  Doctors  in  Literature. 

23.  Doctors  in  Medicine. 

24.  Doctors  in  Laws. 

25.  Doctors  in  Divinity. 


No  Grace  for  a  Degree  will  be  presented  to  the  Senate  unless 
the  Candidate  shall  have  communicated  with  the  Proctor  at  least 
the  day  before  the  Commencements. 


I-ermf)  m\h  (^Mxnu^  xtqnmh  for  t^t  nt^tx^l 
Sti]xttn, 

To  take  the  Degree  of  Bachelor  tn  Arts,  the  Student  must  keep 
the  Terms  required  by  the  Rules  of  the  College.  He  must  pass 
two  stated  E.xaminations — one  at  the  end  of  his  second  j'ear,  the 
other  at  the  termination  of  the  University  Curriculum. 

A  Master  tn  Arts  must  be  a  B.A.  of  three  years'  standing. 

When  tlie  time  at  which *a  liigher  Degree  can  be  taken  is  said 
to  be  reckoned  from  the  taking  of  the  Degree  of  Bachelor  in  Arts, 
or  in  any  Faculty,  the  time  may  be  reckoned  from  the  date  at 
which,  according  to  the  laws  and  statutes  of  the  University,  the 
Degree  of  Bachelor  might  have  been  taken.  Tims  a  Candidate  is 
of  proper  standing  to  take  the  Degree  of  M.A.  three  years  after 
he  has;j«ssef?  the  Examination  for  the  B.A.  Degree.  With  this 
condition,  the  inferior  and  superior  Degree  may  be  taken  on  tlie 
same  day. 

In  the  case  of  a  candidate  for  a  higher  Degree  whose  studies 
have  been  interrupted  owing  to  his  having  served  with  H.  M. 


DEGREES.  1 

Forces,  1914-18,  upon  his  completion  of  the  required  exercises, 
the  date  wlicn  these  exercises  might,  in  the  opinion  of  the  Board, 
have  been  completed,  if  he  had  proceeded  regularly  with  his 
course,  will  be  accepted  as  the  date  of  his  qualifying  for  the 
lower  Degree. 

The  qualitications  for  the  Degree  of  Bachelor  in  Science  (Sc.B.) 
shall  be  research  and  advanced  study  in  any  important  branch  of 
Mathematical,  Experimental,  Natural,  or  Applied  Science. 

A  Graduate  of  tlie  University  of  Dublin,  having  obtained 
Moderatorship  in  Mathematics,  Experimental  Science,  or  Natural 
Science,  may  present  himself  for  the  Degree  of  Sc.B.  one  full 
year  after  graduation,  provided  he  sliall  during  that  year  have 
devoted  himself  to  any  important  branch  of  Matliematics, 
Physics,  Natural  or  Applied  Science,  both  by  advanced  study 
and  by  research.  The  latter,  when  of  an  exi)erimental  or 
observational  nature,  must  be  carried  on,  as  far  as  practicable,  iu 
the  Laboratories  of  tlie  College  ;  or  in  Laboratories  recognized  by 
the  l5oard  and  Council.* 

A  Graduate  of  any  other  approved  University  who  possesses  a 
Degree  the  equivalent  of  Moderatorship,  having  spent  a  full  year 
iu  residence  in  tlie  University  of  Dublin,  and  having  during  that 
time  pursued  one  of  the  brandies  of  Mathematics,  Kxperimental, 
or  Natural  Science,  by  advanced  study  and  research,  as  defined 
above,  shall  be  eligible  to  present  himself  for  the  Degree  of 
Sc.B. 

A  Graduate  of  the  University  of  Dublin  who  has  not  obtained 
a  Moderatorship,  or  a  Graduate  of  any  other  approved  University, 
may  qualify  himself  for  entry  \i\m\\  the  course  of  study  and 
research  by  presenting  himself  at  tlie  Moderatorship  Examination 
which  embraces  the  subject  of  his  intended  studies,  and  obtain- 
ing such  marks  thereat  as  would  qualify  for  Moderatorship. 

The  Candidate  will  be  required  to  submit,  in  writing,  to  the 
Registrar  a  statement  of  the  course  of  study  and  research  wjiieh 
he  desires  to  pursue,  that  it  may  be  laid  before  the  Board  for 
approval. 

The  proficiency  of  the  Candidate  in  the  branch  of  Science 
which  he  lias  selected  shall,  at  the  close  of  his  year  of  study,  be 
tested  by  Examination.  The  Kxamiuers  shall  be  selected  by  the 
Board,  and  may  include  one  or  more  who  are  not  members  of  the 
College  staff. 

The  Candidate  shall  submit  to  the  Registrar,  not  less  than 
one  fortnight  before  the  date  of  the  Examination,  a  Thesis 
(type- written  or  iu  print)  giving  an  account  of  his  research, 
and  shall  at  the  satne  time  forward  to  the  Bursar  the  sum  of 
five  pounds,  and  the  Board  shall  submit  this  Thesis  to  Referees. 
The  Referees   and   Examiners   shall   present   a  joint   report   to 

•Tlie  Laboratories  of  ihe  Royal  College  of  Science,  Dublin,  are  recognized  under 
tills  scheme. 


8  DEGKEKS. 

the  Board  upon  the  merits  of  the  Candidate,  not  less  than  one 
week  before  tlie  date  of  Conferring  of  Degrees.  In  the  event 
of  the  Degree  being  granted,  the  above  iiayraent  will  be  allowed 
as  part  payment  of  the  Degree  fee  of  ten  pounds  to  the  Senior 
Proctor, 

Tlie  following  Scale  of  Fees  for  Extern  Students  preparing 
for  the  So.  H.  Degree  was  approved  by  the  Board : — 

A.  If  the  candidate  proposes  to  present  liimself  at  the 
Moderatorship  Examination  in  order  to  obtain  the  necessary 
qualification,  he  shall  pay  : — (a)  £3  tOs.  for  each  Term  prior 
to  qualifying  at  that  Examination  during  which  he  attends  the 
College  Laboratories  ;  (5)  £11  os.  prior  to  presenting  himself  at 
the  Moderatorship  Examination ;  (c)  £2  2s,  for  each  Term 
subsequent  to  his  qualifying  at  the  Moderatorship  Examination 
during  which  he  attends  the  Laboratories. 

B.  If  the  candidate  does  not  present  himself  at  the  Moderator- 
ship  Examination,  he  shall  pay  £3  lOs.  for  each  Term  during 
which  he  attends  the  College  Laboratories. 

Doctor  in  Philosophy . — A  candidate  for  the  Degree  of  Doctor 
in  Philosophy  (Ph.D.)  must  either  («)  be  a  graduate  of  the 
University  who  has  gained  a  Moderatorship,  or  has  obtained  the 
Degree  of  So.  li.,  or  has  done  such  work  in  the  Laboratories 
during  his  Undergraduate  course  as  shall  show  his  fitness  to 
proceed  with  the  exercises  required  for  the  degree ;  or  (6)  have 
obtained  a  degree  in  some  other  approved  university  such  as  will 
qualify  him  to  enter  on  a  course  of  advanced  study  or  research. 

The  candidate,  qualified  as  above,  must  pursue,  iinder  the 
supervision  of  the  professors  concerned,  a  whole-time  course  of 
research  or  advanced  study  in  some  branch  of  science,  or  letters, 
or  philosophy  selected  by  him,  for  a  period  of  two  academic  years. 
Provided  always  that  in  lieu  thereof  an  equivalent  amount  of  work, 
spread  over  a  longer  period,  may  be  accepted,  and  that  iu 
substitution  for  one  of  the  two  years  the  candidate  raaj'  offer 
evidence  of  an  equivalent  amount  of  literary  or  research  work 
done  previously  in  an  approved  institution,  or  may  elect,  at  the 
conclusion  of  his  first  year,  and  with  the  approval  of  the  professors 
concerned,  to  pass  his  second  year  at  some  other  seat  of  learning 
at  hortie  or  abroad. 

At  the  conclusion  of  his  course  the  candidate  must  embody  his 
results  in  a  thesis,  which  must  be  approved  by  the  professor  or 
professors  concerned  as  sufficiently  showing  the  candidate's 
qualification  for  the  degree,  and  which  must  be  comaiunicated  by 
him  to  a  meeting  held  within  tlie  College,  open  to  all  members  of 
the  University,  and  convened  by  the  Provost.  He  may  also 
be  required  to  present  himself  for  examination  in  branches  of 
knowledge  cognate  to  the  special  field  of  his  researches. 


DKGKEE8.  9 

The  Examiners  appointed  to  report  on  the  merit  of  the  work 
submitted  sliall  have  power  to  question  the  author  upon  his  work, 
either  viva  voce  or  in  writing'. 

The  work  must  be  printed  and  placed  in  the  hands  of  tlie 
Registrar  to  be  submitted  to  the  Examiners  at  least  two  months 
before  the  date  of  the  Commencements  at  which  the  candidate 
desires  to  obtain  the  Degree. 

Doctorate  in  Science  or  Literature.—  kny  graduate  applying 
to  the  Registrar  to  have  the  Private  Grace  of  the  Provost  and 
Senior  Fellows  for  the  Degree  of  Doctor  in  Science  or  Doctor  in 
Literature  must  as  a  preliminary  step  lodge  with  the  Bursar  the 
sum  of  ten  pounds,  to  be  paid  to  the  Examiners  who  are  to 
inquire  into  the  scientific  or  literary  claims  of  the  applicant :  in 
the  event  of  the  Degree  being  granted,  this  sum  will  be  allowed 
in  part  payment  to  the  Senior  Proctor  of  the  fee  of  twenty-five 
pounds  for  the  Degree.  The  candidate  must  also,  with  the  work 
he  submits  for  the  Degree,  supply  full  information  as  to  the 
authorities  and  materials  which  he  has  used,  and  must  declare, 
in  writing,  that  the  work  is  his  own  and  has  not  been  submitted 
as  an  exercise  for  a  Degree  at  any  otlier  University. 

The  Examiners  appointed  to  report  on  the  merit  of  the  work 
submitted  shall  have  power  to  (juestion  the  author  upon  his  work, 
either  viva  voce  or  in  writing. 

The  work  must  be  printed  and  placed  in  the  hands  of  the 
Registrar  that  it  may  be  submitted  to  the  Examiners  at  least 
two  montlis  before  tlie  date  of  the  Commencements  at  which 
the  candidate  desires  to  obtain  the  Degree. 

A  Doctor  in  Science  must  be  a  Bachelor  in  Arts  of  the  University 
of  Dublin  of  at  least  three  years'  standing.  The  primary  test  for 
the  Doctorate  shall  be  original  published  work  in  Science  sub- 
mitted by  the  candidate.  It  must  contain  such  results  as  mark 
an  advance  in  seientiKc  knowledge ;  and  in  the  case  of  experi- 
mental work  must  show  the  candidate's  power  of  following  up 
experimental  evidence  in  the  elucidation  of  phenomena,  and  that 
he  possesses  originality  in  planning  experiments  and  ability  in 
deducing  conclusions  therefrom. 

A  Doctor  in  Literature  must  be  a  Bachelor  in  Arts  of  the 
University  of  Dublin  of  at  least  three  years'  standing. 
The  primary  test  for  the  Doctorate  shall  be  published  work 
submitted  by  the  candidate,  and  forming  an  original  contribution 
to  the  study  of  (rt)  Literature,  Ancient  or  Modern;  or  (i)  Philo- 
sophy ;  or  (c)  Esthetics ;  or  [d)  History;  or  (e)  Archaeology. 
Works  dealing  with  other  departments  of  study,  such  as  Theology 
or  Law,  which  [)ossess  a  special  doctorate,  may  not  be  submitted 
for  the  Litt.D.)  The  candidate's  work  must  show  evidence  of 
independent  inquiry,  and  must  either  contain  some  real  addition 
to  knowledge,  or  present  a  fresh  interpretation  of  materials 

B  3 


10  DEGREES. 

already  known .  It  must  be  of  substantial  importance,  and  shoiild, 
as  a  rule,  be  concerned  with  a  single  subject.  If  separate  papers 
or  essays  are  submitted,  they  should  exhibit  some  unity  of  aim. 

Degrees  in  Divinity. — All  exercises  and  examinations  necessarj* 
to  the  attainment  of  Degi'ees  in  Divinity  are  under  the  control  of 
a  Court  consisting  of  the  Regius  Professor  of  Divinity  or  liis 
Deputy,  Archbishop  King's  Professor  of  Divinity,  tlie  Professor 
of  IJiblical  Greek,  and  the  Professor  of  Ecclesiastical  History. 

All  correspondence  relative  to  Degrees  in  Divinity  must  be 
addressed  to  the  llegius  Professor,  or  to  his  Deputy. 

A  Bachelor  of  Divinity  must  be  a  Bachelor  of  Arts  of  three 
years'  standing.  He  must  likewise  have  undergone  a  special 
Examination  in  Divinity. 

Candidates  for  this  Degree  will  be  required  to  show  a  general 
knowledge  of  the  Scriptures  of  the  Old  and  New  Testament,  of 
Ecclesiastical  History,  and  of  Dogmatic  Theology,  and  also  to 
have  made  a  special  study  of  some  particular  branches. 

Exaviinutions. — As  a  general  rule,  it  is  required  that  Candidates 
shall  be  examined  in  the  Course  annually  appointed  for  Exami- 
nation for  Theological  Exhibitions  (see  under  Divinity  School, 
"  Theological  Exhibitions  ").    It  consists  of  six  Divisions,  viz. : — 

I.  Old  'lestament, 
II.  Hebrew, 
III.  New  Testament, 
IV.  Dogmatic  Theology, 

V.  Ecclesiastical  History,  and 
VI.  Patristic  Theology. 

Candidates  for  the  15.1).  Degree  are  permitted  to  bring  up  any 
one  or  more  of  these  Divisions,  in  any  order,  at  any  one  of  the 
three  Examinations  which  are  annually  held  in  March,  June, 
and  December,  and  to  reserve  the  rest  for  any  subsequent 
Examination  or  Examinations.  They  are  required  to  give  notice 
to  the  llegius  Professor  a  month  before  the  Examination  at  which 
they  propose  to  present  themselves,  stating  at  the  same  time  in 
what  divisions  of  the  Course  they  desire  to  be  examined.  Each 
Candidate,  when  lie  gives  such  notice,  must  send  to  the  Senior 
Proctor  an  examination  fee  of  one  guinea  for  each  Division  si)ecified 
in  his  notice.  The  fees  so  paid  by  the  Candidate  will,  iu  case  he 
obtains  the  Degree,  be  allowed  (to  an  amount  not  exceeding  six 
guineas)  in  part  payment  of  the  Degree  fee  of  £13  15s. 

The  Court,  on  sufHcient  reason  being  shown,  may  make 
different  arrangements  for  a  Candidate's  Examination.  Appli- 
cation for  such  special  arrangements  must  be  made  three 
months  before  the  Commencements  at  which  the  Candidate 
desires  to  obtain  his  Degree. 


DEGREES 


il 


Candidates  who  do  not  hold  the  Divinity  Testimonium  will 
further  be  examined  in  the  following : — 
Division  VII. 

(1)  Butler,  The  Analogy. 

(2)  The  Article  Miracle  in  Hastings'  Dictionary  of  the  Bible. 

(3)  Paley,  Rora  I'aulina. 

(4)  A.  B.  Davidson,  Old  Testament  Prophecy.     Edited  by  J.  A. 

Pateison,  omitting  chaps.  S,  9,  10,  12,  15,  18,  23,  24. 

(5)  Swete,  I'he  Apostles^  Creed. 

(6)  The  Thirty-nine  Articles  of  Religion,  with  Bishop  Gibson's 

Exposition. 
Candidates,  on   giving  not  less   than  one   month's  notice,  may 
substi'vUte  for  (6)  Tlie   IFeslminster  Confession  of  Faith,   The 
Form  ofPresbytcrial  Church  Government,  and  The  Directory 
for  Public  Worship. 
Thesis. — As  a  proof  that  the  Candidate  has,  in  addition  to  the 
general  conrse  of  reading,  made  a  special  study  of  some  particular 
branch,  he  must  send  to  the  Kegius  Professor,  two  mouths  before 
the  day  of  Commencements,  a  Thesis,  printed  or  type-written, 
on  a  subject  chosen  by  himself  and  approved  of  by  the  Court. 
The  Thesis  should  be  accompanied  with  references  to  the  authors 
consulted  in  its  composition. 

A  Doctor  in  Divinity  must  he  a  Hachelor  of  Arts  of  eight 
years'  standing,  and  must  also  be  a  Bachelor  in  Divinity.  He 
is  required  to  present  a  printed  Thesis,  in  which  he  has  treated  of 
and  explained  some  portion  of  Doctrine  from  the  Holy  Scriptures, 
or  of  the  History  ot  the  Church,  or  of  Dogmatic  Theology.  It  is 
desirable  that  the  Candidate,  before  printing  his  Thesis,  should 
have  the  subject  approved  of  by  the  Court,  This  Tliesis  he  must 
send  to  the  ilegius  Professor  two  months  before  the  day  of 
Commencements,  and  at  the  sam*  time  he  must  lodge  with 
the  Bursar  a  sura  of  £5,  to  be  paid  to  an  Examiner  appointed 
by  the  Court,  who,  together  with  the  Kegius  Professor,  shall 
report  to  the  Court  on  the  merits  of  the  Thesis.  In  the  event 
of  the  Degreo  being  granted,  such  sum  will  be  allowed  in  part 
payment  to  the  Senior  Proctor  of  the  fee  of  £26  for  the  Degree. 
The  University  of  Dublin  Tests  Act  (36  Vict.  chap.  21)  abolishes 
the  necessit}'  formerly  imposed  on  Candidates  for  the  Degree  of 
Bachelor  or  of  Doctor  of  Divinity  of  subscribing  the  declaration 
of  the  Royal  Supremacy,  the  Liturgy  of  the  United  Church  of 
England  and  Ireland,  and  the  Thirty-nine  Articles. 

A  Bachelor  in  Laws  must  have  taken  the  Degree  of  Bachelor 
in  Arts.  He  must  also  have  pasoed  a  Special  Examination.  For 
details,  see  Law  School. 

A  Doctor  ill  L'.iws  must  he  a  B.A.  of  three  years'  standing,  and 
must  have  taken  the  degree  of  LL.B. 

.For  the  procedure  by  which  Candidates  may  qualify  them- 
selves to  obtain  this  Degree,  see  School  of  Law. 


12  DBOBECS. 

A  Bachelor  in  3fedicme  must  have  taken  the  Degree  of  Bachelor 

in  Arts,  and  must  have  spent  iive  years  in  the  study  of  Medicine. 

Before  the  Grace  of  the  House  can  be  obtained,  the  Candidate  must 

pass  a  public  Examination  in  the  Hall  before  the  Medical  Professors. 

For  regulations  see  School  of  Physic. 

A  Doctor  in  3Iedicine  must  have  taken  the  M.B.  Degree,  and 
must  be  of  M.A.  standing.  He  must  also  read  a  Thesis  publicly 
before  the  Regius  Professor  of  Physic  or  must  undergo  an  lixarai- 
nation  before  the  Regius  Professor,  according  to  regulations  to 
be  approved  by  the  Board. 

A  Bachelor  in  Surgery  must  be  a  Bachelor  in  Arts,  and  have  spent 
five  years  in  the  study  of  Surgery  and  Anatomy.  Before  the  Grace 
of  the  House  can  be  obtained,  the  Candidate  must  pass  a  public 
Examination  in  the  Hall  before  the  Professors  of  the  School. 

A  Master  in  Surgery  must  be  a  B.Ch.  of  three  years'  standing, 
and  must  produce  satisfactory  evidence  of  having  been  engaged 
for  not  less  than  two  years  from  the  date  of  his  registration 
in  the  study  or  practice  of  his  profession.  He  must  then  pass 
an  Examination  in  Surgery  and  Surgical  Anatomy.  Graduates 
in  Surgery  of  the  University  of  Dublin,  of  not  less  than  ten 
years'  standing,  maj'  be  recommended  for  the  Degree  of  M.  Ch. 
by  the  vote  of  the  Court  of  Examiners  on  such  Examination  as 
they  shall  determine. 

A  Bachelor  iii  Obstetric  Science  must  have  graduated  in 
Medicine,  have  attended  a  Wintej-'s  Course  of  Lectures  in 
Midwifery  at  a  recognized  School,  have  practised  Midwifery  for 
six  months  at  a  recognized  Hospital  or  Maternity,  and  must  pass 
&n  Examination  in  Practical  Midwifery,  Gynsecology,  and  Obste- 
trical Anatomy. 

A  Master  in  Obstetric  Science  must  be  a  B.A.O.  of  two  j'ears 
standing,  and  must  produce  satisfactory  evidence  of  having  been 
engaged  for  two  years  in  the  study  of  Obstetric  Science.  Before 
the  Grace  of  the  House  can  be  obtained,  the  Candidate  must  pass 
the  M.A.O.  Examination  according  to  regulations  approved  by 
the  Board. 

A  Bachelor  m  Denial  Science  must  be  a  Bachelor  in  Arts, 
must  have  spent  at  least  four  years  in  the  School  of  Dentistry, 
and  passed  the  requisite  Examinations. 

Masters  in  Dental  Science  must  be  Bachelors  in  Dental 
Science  of  at  least  one  year's  standing.  They  will  be  required  to 
pass  an  Examination  in  Pathology  and  Hacteriology,  and  either 
to  carry  out  Dental  work  of  an  advanced  cliaracter  to  the  satis- 
faction of  the  Examiners,  or  to  present  a  thesis  to  be  approved  of 
by  them,  giving  evidence  of  original  research  on  some  subject 
connected  with  Dentistry. 

A  Bachelor  i»  Civil  Engineering  must  have  taken  the  Degree 
of  Bachelor  in  Arts.  He  must  also  have  spent  two  years  at  least 
in  the  study  of  Civil  Engineering,  and  have  passed  all  the 
Examinations  of  the  School.     (See  Engineering  School.) 


DEGRESS.  13 

A  Master  in  Civil  Engiiieering  must  have  taken  the  Degree  of 
Bachelor  in  Civil  Engineeriug;  he  must  also  have  practised  for  three 
years  as  a  Civil  Engineer,  after  having  obtained  the  Degreeof  B.A.I. 

A  Bachelor  in  Ayricullure,  or  in  AyrictiUtire  [Forestry),  must 
have  taken  the  Degree  of  Bachelor  in  Arts,  and  must  have 
ful tilled  the  necessarj'  conditions.  For  details,  see  "Schools  of 
Agriculture  and  of  Forestry." 

Degrees  in  Music, — Candidates  for  Degrees  in  Music  must 
matriculate  in  Arts,  but  are  not  required,  as  in  the  other 
Faculties,  to  proceed  with  the  Arts  Course. 

Bachelor  in  3Iusic. — This  Examination  is  divided  into  two 
parts : — 

1.  Preliminary  ^jeamination  to  include — 

(a)  Harmony  up  to  four  parts. 

(h)  Counterpoint  up  to  four  parts,  strict  and  free. 

(c)  A  critical  knowledge  of  the  following  works  : — 

Beethoven — Pianoforte  Sonatas  ;  Op.  10,  No.  3  ;  Op.  22 

(in  B   flat);    Op.  28   (in    D  major);   Op.   31,  No.  2; 

Op.  53  (Waldstein)  ;  Op.  57  (Appassionata). 
Mendelssohn — Trio  I.  in  D  minor  (Op.  49)  for  Pianoforte, 

Violin,  and  'Cello.     (Payne's  Miniature  Scores.) 
Mozart — String  Quartet,  No.    6,  in  C  major.     (Payne's 

Miniature  Scores.) 
Parry — Songs  of  Farewell  (Year-Book  Press). 

[The  list  will  be  varied  from  time  to  time.  Candidates 
are  requested  to  bring  the  scores  with  them.  This  list 
stands  till  1925.] 

[d)  Musical  history  up  to  Bach  and  Handel,  inclusive. 
{e)    Viva,  voce  on  general  knoM'ledge  of  music. 

Before  entering  for  the  Final  Examination  the  candidate  must 
either  submit  an  exercise,  or  undergo  a  practical  test  at  the  organ 
or  pianoforte. 

A.  The  exercise  may  be  either — 

(1)  a  vocal  cantata  containing  a  solo,  an  unaccompanied  quartet, 
a  five-part  chorus,  and  a  four-part  fugue,  with  accompani- 
ment  for  strings  only  ; 

(2)  a  string  quartet  containing  the  usual  four  movements. 

Candidates  may  apply  to  the  Registrar  for  permission  to  submit 
an  Exercise  which  does  not  fultil  the  above  conditions.  But  it 
must  contain  a  fair  amount  of  contrapuntal  choral  writing,  with 
independent  accompaniment,  and  some  solo  work.  The  accom- 
paniment may  be  for  strings,  with  or  witliout  the  additionof 
wood-wind  and  two  horns.  Strings  are  compulsory.  Any  of  the 
above  extra  instruments  may  be  added  at  discretion. 

The  exercises  must  be  sent  to  the  Registrar  of  the  School  of 
Music  not  later  than  two  months  before  the  date  of  the 
Examination. 


14:  DtGREKS. 

B.  Should  the  candidate  choose  the  practical  test  in  lieu  of  the 
exercise,  he  must  be  prepared  to  play  the  following  pieces  [for 
1922  and  1923]*:— 

Pianoforte  :  /.  S.  Bach. — Prehide  and  Fugne  in  A  flat,  major,  No.  41. 
Sibelius. — Impromptu    in    B    minor,    Op.    5,    No.    5 
(Chester). 
Organ  :  /.  S.  Bach. — Prelude    and  Fugue   in  15    minor    (Peters' 
edition,  vol.  2). 
Cesar  Franck. — Pastorale  in  E. 

Candidates  (whether  they  choose  organ  or  pianoforte)  will  be 
required  to  transpose  and  also  to  play  at  sight. 

The  practical  test  will  take  place  in  Dublin  immediately  before 
the  Final  Examination  ;  and  successful  candidates  may  sit  for 
that  examination  at  once.  • 

2.  Final  Examination  : — 

{a)  Harmony  up  to  five  parts. 

(i)  Counterpoint  up  to  five  parts,  strict  and  free. 

(c)  Double  counterpoint. 

(d)  Canon  in  two  parts,  with  the  addition  of  a  free  part. 

(e)  Fugue  up  to  four  parts. 

(/)  A  critical  knowledge  of  Bach's  "  "Wohltemperirte  Clavier," 
Book  i,  and  also  of  Mozart's  Jupiter  Symphony  (full 
score),  and  Stanford,  The  Revenge  (short  score). 

[The  list  will  be  varied  from  time  to  time.  Candidates 
are  requested  to  bring  the  scores  with  them.  This  list 
stands  till  1925.] 

{g)  Musical  history  from  C.  P.  E.  Bach  up  to  the  present  time. 

(A)  Viva  voce,  principally  to  test  the  candidate's  acquaintance 
with  admitted  masterpieces. 

Doctor  in  Mtistc. — A  Doctor  in  Music  must  be  a  Bachelor  in 
Music  of  the  University  of  Dublin.  Before  sitting  for  the  exami- 
nation the  candidate  must  submit  an  Exercise. 

A.  The  Exercise  may  be  either — 

(1)  a  work  for  voices  and  full  orchestra,  comprising — 

(rt)  an  overture  or  introduction, 

[b)  at  least  one  choral  movement  in  eight  real  parts,  Muth 

independent  accompaniment ; 

[c)  at  least  one  solo  ; 

{d)  specimens  of  contrapuntal  writing  ; 
or, 

(2)  a  symphony  for  full  orchestra  in  the  usual  four  movements. 

Exercises  must  be  sent  to  the  Registrar  of  the  School  of  Music 
not  later  than  two  months  before  the  date  of  the  Examination. 

•  The  pieces  chosen  for  the  years  1924  and  1925  are  the  following  :— 
Pianoforte :  J.  S.  ^acA.— Prelude  and  Fugue  in  G  minor  (No.  IC). 
Orieg.—TiaWaA  in  6  minor,  Op.  24  (Augener). 
Organ  i  J.  S.  JSac/i.— Toccata  and  Fugue  in  D  minor  (Peters,  vol.  2). 
(ScAwniann.— Canon  in  B  minor  (Novello). 


DEGJIKBS. 


15 


final  Examination — 

The  Examination  will  include: — 

(«)  Harmony  and  Counterpoint,  strict  and  free,  up  to  eight  parts. 

{b)  Double  and  triple  Counterpoint. 

(c)  Canon  up  to  four  parts. 

{d)  Composition. 

(«)  Orchestration  of  given  or  original  material. 

(/)  Critical  and  historical  questions. 

(^)  Viva  voce,  principally  lo  test  the  candidate's   knowledge  of 
the   works   of   the  great  masters. 

Strict  Counterpoint  will  include  tho  addition  of  parts  to  a  given 
part  in  the  style  of  the  Polyphonic  Schools  of  the  sixteenth 
century.  In  the  Final  Mus.B.  and  Mus.D.  it  will  also  include 
the  writing  of  a  short  madrigal  or  motet  in  the  style  of  this 
period.  Candidates  should  study  the  works  of  Palestrina,  Byrd, 
Gibbons,  &c. 

All  the  several  Musical  Examinations  are  held  concurrently, 
twice  a  year,  on  days  announced  in  the  Calendar,  and  all 
candidates  are  required  to  give  at  least  a  fortnight's  notice  to 
the  llegistrar  of  the  School  of  Music. 

ToUil  Fees.— Fee  for  Matriculation,  ....  £15 
Bachelor  of  Music,*  .  .  .  .  10 
Doctor  of  Music,  ....       20 

Details  of  Fees:  — 

Mus.B.— 
Fee  to  be  paid  by  candidate  before  he  presents  himself 

for  Examination, £2     0     0 

Fee  to  be  paid  by  candidate  before  he  sends   in  his 

Exercise,  or  before  his  Practical  Test,  .         .300 

Fee  to  be  paid  by  candidate  before  he  presents  himself 

at  the  Commencements,       •  .      .         .         .         .500 


£10    0     0 

Mus.D.— 

Fee  to  be  paid  by  candidate  before  he  sends  in  his 

Exercise, 5     0     0 

Fee  to  be  paid  by  candidate  before  he  presents  himself 

at  the  Commencements, 15     0     0 


£20     0     0 

These  fees  are  to  be  sent  to  the  Senior  Proctor. 

A  candidate  failing  in  any  one  Examination  will  be  admitted 
to  the  next  following  Kxamination  only  of  the  same  Grade  without 
payment. 

If  he  then  fail,  he  must  pay  the  ordinary  fee  before  presenting 
himself  again. 

Those  candidates  who  are  eligible  for  presentation  for  the 
Degree  of  Bachelor  or  Doctor  in  Music  should  interview  the 
Senior  Proctor  as  to  the  necessary  steps  for  presentation. 

•  If  candidate  is  a  B  A.  of  tlie  University,  the  Fee  is  only  £5. 


16  BKGBKRS. 

Admission  of  Candidates  to  Degrees  "  m  absentia.^' — A  Student 
of  the  University  may  be  allowed  (although  not  present  in  the 
Senate)  to  proceed  to  his  Degree  upon  the  following  conditions  : — 

1.  The  academic  qualification  required  for  Degrees  to  be  conferred 
in  absentia  are  the  same  as  those  required  for  Degrees  conferred  in 
person. 

2.  The  requirements  as  to  fitness  of  character  are  also  the  same  as 
those  required  for  Degrees  conferred  in  person,  viz. :  that  before  passing 
any  Grace  for  a  Degree  inabsentid  the  Board  shall  require  such  evidence 
as  it  may  deem  necessary  to  secure  that  no  unworthy  Candidate  is 
presented  to  the  Senate. 

3.  Subject  to  the  foregoing,  the  Board  may  pass  a  Grace  for  a 
Degree  in  absentia  («)  for  any  Candidate  resident  without  the  British 
Isles,  or  (i)  for  any  Candidate  resident  within  tlie  British  Isles  if  the 
circumstances  which  prevent  his  appearing  in  person  are  in  their  opinion 
of  a  sufficiently  grave  or  exceptional  nature. 

Admission  '■'■ad  eundem  Gradtini." — A  candidate  who  holds  an 
Oxford  or  Cambridge  Degree  may  be  admitted  to  the  corresponding 
Degree  in  Dublin,  if  the  Senior  Lecturer  and  the  Senior  Proctor 
are  satisfied  that  his  reasons  for  seeking  the  Degree,  and  his 
academic  qualifications  are  sufficient ;  letters  testimonial  from 
the  autliorities  of  the  applicant's  College  as  to  character  to  be 
sent  to  the  Senior  Proctor  in  every  case. 

Tlie  fee  for  the  B.A.  Degree  ad  eundem  is  £13  5s.,  as  the 
Candidate  must  place  his  name  on  the  College  books.  In  all  other 
cases  the  fee   is  the  same  as  that  payable  by  Dublin  Graduates. 

Candidates  who  have  paid  to  the  Senior  Proctor  the  fee  for  a 
Degree  ad  eundem  may  present  themselves  for  the  examination 
for  a  higher  Degree  on  payment  of  the  regular  examination  fee, 
and  before  the  ad  eundem  Degree  has  been  conferred,  and  if  the 
Candidate  be  successful,  the  higher  and  lower  Degrees  may  be 
conferred  at  the  same  Commencements. 

For  the  purpose  of  ascertaining  the  date  at  which  a  liigher 
Degree  may  be  taken,  the  Candidate  is  reckoned  as  having  taken 
tlie  lower  Degree  ad  eundem  on  the  date  at  which  he  obtained 
the  corresponding  Degi'eein  his  own  University.. 

Application  for  the  Degree  of  B.A.  ad  eundem  must  be  made 
through  the  Senior  Lecturer,  in  all  otlier  cases  through  the 
Senior  Proctor. 

Degrees  {jure  officii)  not  higher  than  that  of  Master  in  any 
Faculty  may  be  conferred  upon  Professors,  Lecturers,  Readers, 
and  Officers  of  the  University  or  College  ;  provided  that  no  person 
shall  be  admitted  to  such  a  Degree  unless  he  be  of  at  least  two 
years'  standing  in  his  office,  and,  in  the  case  of  Degrees  in  the 
Professional  Schools,  has  been  recommended  by  the  Committee 
or  Council  of  the  School  concerned. 

Provided  also  that  the  Private  Grace  of  the  Board  for  any  such 
Degree  shall  be  submitted  to  a  meeting  of  the  Senate  other  than 
that  at  which  Degrees  are  conferred. 


DfiGBfiES.  1? 

tahUla  expexsauum  pro  unoquoque  ouadu  academico. 
Baccaliiureus  in  Artibus  (B.A.), 

Nobilis, £5     0     0 

Soc.  Comra,, 300 

Pens. 200 

Magister  in  Artibus  (M. A.), 9  16     6 

Baccalaureus  ill  Scientiis  (Sc.B.), 10     0     0 

Doctor  in  Philosophia  (Pb,  D.), 15     0     0 

Doctor  in  Scientiis  (Sc.D.), 25     0     0 

Doctor  in  Litteris(Litt.D.), 25     0     0 

Baccalaureus  in  Sancta  Theologia  (B.D.),       ....     13  15     0 

Doctor  in  Sancta  Tbeologia  (D.D.), 26    0     0 

Baccalaureus  in  Utroque  Jure  (LL.B.), 11   15     0 

Doctor  in  Qtroque  Jure  (LL.D.), 22     0     0 

Baccalaureus  in  Medicina  (M,B.), 11     0     0 

Doctor  in  Medicina(M.D.) 20     0     0 

Baccalaureus  in  CbirurgiA  (B.Ch.) 5     0     0 

Magister  in  Chirurgia  (M.Ch.), 11     0     0 

Baccalaureus  in  Arte  Obstetricia  (B. A. 0.),      ....       100 

Magister  in  Arte  Obstetricia  (M. A. ().), 10     0     0 

Baccalaureus  in  Dentiiria  Scientia  (B.Dent.Sc),  .  .  10  0  0 
Magister  in  Dentaria  Scientia  (M.Dent.Sc),  ....  10  0  0 
Baccalaureus  in  Arte  Ingeniaria  (B.A.I. ),       ....       100 

Magister  in  Arte  Ingeniaria  (M.A.I. ), 10     0     0 

Baccalaureus  in  Agri  Cultura  (Agr.B.), 5     0     0 

Baccalaureus  in  Agri(Fore8tarii)Cultura[Agr.(Forest.)H.],  5  0  0 
Baccalaureus  in  Musica  (Mus.B.),  for  Non-graduates,        10     0     0 

,,  ,,  for  Graduates, 6     0     0 

Doctor  in  Musica  (Mus.D.) 20     0     0    ' 

The  Senior  Proctor  receives  the  Fees  for  all  the  above  Degrees, 
with  the  exception  of  those  for  the  Degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts, 
which  are  payable  to  the  Junior  Bursar. 

'restimoidums. — A  fee  of  thirty  shillings  must  be  paid  on 
taking  out  tlie  Testimoniums  of  tlie  following  Degrees: — Sc.D., 
Litt.l).,  M.A.O. ;  a  fee  of  ten  shillings  on  taking  out  the 
Testimoniums  of  M.A.,  B.l).,  D.D,  LL.B,  LL.D.,  M.A.I. , 
Mus.  B.,  Mus.  i>.  ;  tlie  fees  for  taking  out  the  Testimoniums, 
of  the  other  Degrees,  naraelv :— B.A.,  Sc.B.,  Ph.D,  M.B.,  M.D., 
B.Ch.,  M.Ch.,  B.A.O.,  15.  Dent.  Sc.,M.  Dent.  Sc,  B.A.I .,  Agr.  B., 
and  Agr.  (Forest.)  B.,  are  included  in  the  fees  charged  for  the 
Degrees  in  the  preceding  Schedule. 

N.  B. — As  some  inconvenience  may  be  occasioned  to  Graduates  by 
unavoidable  delay  in  the  issue  of  Testimoniums,  all  Students  re- 
quiring the  Testimoniums  of  their  Degrees  during  the  Summer 
Vacation  are  requested  to  make  application  for  them  before  the 
30th  of  June.  As  a  general  rule,  Testimoniums  of  Degrees  will 
not  be  issued  during  the  Vacation. 

Diplomas  and  Liccnises.^The  conditions  on  which  Diplomas  are 
granted  in  Gynaecology  and  Obstetrics,  Agriculture,  Education, 
Economics  and  Commercial  Knowledge,  and  Religious  Knowledge 
for  Women,  and  Licenses  are  granted  in  Medicine,  Surgery, 
Obstetric  Science,  and  Civil  Engineering,  will  be  found  under  the 
corresponding  headings. 


18  DEGREES. 

Hoods  of  Degrees. — B,A.,  black  lined  with  white  fur;  M.A., 
black  lined  with  blue;  Ph.D.,  scarlet  cloth  lined  with  yellow  ; 
Sc.B.,  Dark  green  lined  witli  black;  Sc.D.,  scarlet  cloth  lined 
with  myrtle  green  ;  Litt.D.,  scarlet  cloth  lined  witli  blue  ; 
B.I).,  black  lined  with  fine  black  silk;  D.D,,  scarlet  cloth  lined 
with  black;  LL.B.,  black  lined  with  white;  LL.D.,  scarlet 
cloth  lined  with  pink;  M.B.,  black  lined  with  crimson;  B.Ch., 
black  lined  with  white,  edged  with  blue;  B.A.O.,  black  lined 
with  olive;  M.Ch.,  crimson  lined  with  white,  edged  with  blue; 
M.A.O.,  black  lined  purple;  M.D.,  scarlet  cloth  lined  with 
crimson;  B.Dent.Sc,  myrtle  green  lined  with  black  watered 
silk,  edged  with  crimson  ;  M.Dent.Sc,  myrtle  green  lined  with 
pale  blue,  edged  with  crimson;  li.A.I.,  black  lined  with  green; 
M.A.I.,  white  lined  with  green;  Mus. B.,  pale  blue  lined  with 
white  fur;  Mus.D.,  white  flowered  silk  lined  with  rose  satin; 
Agr.H.,  black  lined  with  brown;  Agr.  (Forest)  B.,  black  lined 
with  brown,  edged  with  green. 

(The  material  is  silk  unless  otherwise  specified.) 
Gowns. — Bachelors'  and  Masters'  gowns,  black  cloth  silk  or 
poplin  ;  Ph.D.,  scarlet  cloth  faced  with  yellow  silk  ;  Sc.D.,  scarlet 
cloth  faced  with  myrtle  green  silk  ;  Litt.D.,  scarlet  cloth  faced 
with  blue  silk  ;  D.D.,  scarlet  cloth  faced  with  black  velvet  ; 
LL.D.,  scarlet  cloth  faced  with  pink  silk;  M.O.,  scarlet  cloth 
faced  with  crimson  silk. 


liej^re^entation  of  \\t  litrljcrsitji  in  parliament. 

Undeu  the  Representation  of  the  People  Act,  1918,  the  University 
of  Dublin  returns  two  members  to  Parliament,  under  a  system  of 
Proportional  Representation. 

Every  person  of  full  age  [i.e.,  21  in  the  case  of  a  man  and  30  in 
that  of  a  woman)  is  entitled  to  be  registered  as  a  Parliamentarj' 
elector  for  the  constituency  of  the  Universitj'  of  Dublin,  provided 
that  he  is  a  British  subject  and  is  not  subject  to  any  legal 
incapacity*  and  has  received  a  Degree  (other  than  an  Honorary 
Degree)  at  the  University,  or  has  obtained  a  Scholarship  or 
Fellowship  in  the  University,  whether  before  or  after  the  passing 
of  the  Act. 

A  registration  fee  of  £1  is  charged  to  Bachelors  in  Arts  who 
graduated  when  the  Degree  fee  for  a  Bachelor  in  Arts  was  £1  ; 
but  no  fee  is  charged  to  Doctors  or  Masters  or  to  Bachelors  who 
graduated  since  the  Degree  fee  was  raised  from  £1  to  £2.  Forms 
of  application  may  be  obtained  on  application  to  the  Assistant 
to  the  Registrar  of  University  Electors. 

*  This  restriction  applies  only  to  conscientious  objectors  and  to  those 
convicted  of  offences  under  the  Defence  of  the  Realm  Act. 


(     19     ) 


ORDER  OF  RANK  IN  THE  COLLEGE. 
The  several  orders  in  the  College  are  the  following : — 

1.  The  PiiovosT  or  Head  of  the  College  ;  who  must  be  not  less 
than  thirty  years  of  age. 

2.  Fellows;  who  were  formerly  bound  to  enter  into  Priest's 
Orders,  except  five :  of  whom  one  was  elected  Mediciis,  by  the 
Provost  and  Senior  Fellows,  and  two  others  were  elected  Jurista 
juris  Civilis  and  Jurista  juris  Auglici,  respectively.  This  obliga- 
tion to  take  Holy  Orders  was  removed  by  the  Act  36  Victoria, 
chap.  21. 

3.  NoBLEMKN,  Sons  op  Noblkmex,  and  Baronets,  who  are 
matriculated  as  such  under  the  title  of  Nobilis,  Filius  Nohilis,  and 
Eques. 

4.  Doctors  in  the  several  Faculties,  Bachelors  in  DiviNitr 
and  Masfeks  in  Arts,  Sukgerv,  Obstetric  Scienck,  Civil 
Engineering,  Dental  Science.  Doctors  and  Masters  liave  no 
Collegiate  privileges  or  duties,  unless  their  names  are  kept  on 
the  College  Books. 

5.  Bachelors  in  Civil  Law,  Medicine,  Surgery,  Obstetric 
Science,  Civil  Engineering,  Dental  Scienck,  Agricdltuue, 
and  Bachelors  in  Arts.  They  are  not  required  to  keep  their 
names  on  the  University  or  on  the  College  Books  in  order  to 
entitle  them  to  proceed  to  tlie  higher  Degrees.  All  Graduates 
are  entitled  to  be  registered  as  Parliamentary  electors  for  the 
constituency  of  the  University  of  Dublin.  Graduates  other  than 
Doctors  and  Masters  should  apply  to  the  Assistant  Registrar. 

6.  Fellow-Commoners,  who  have  the  privilege  of  dining  at  tlie 
Fellows'  Table. 

7.  Scholars  who  are  on  the  foundation,  being  members  of  the 
Cooperation  of  the  College  (see  under  Scholarship). 

The  number  of  Scholars  is  seventy,  of  whom  thirty  were 
formerly  termed  natives  [Hihernici),  but  this  distinction  has 
been  abolished  by  King's  Letter,  8  Geo.  IV. 

8.  Pensioners,  namely  ordinary  Students  in  Arts. 

9.  Sizars,  who  are  Students  of  limited  means,  having  their 
commons  free  of  expense,  and  being  exempted  from  annual  fees. 
They  were  formerly  nominated,  one  by  each  Fellow,  and  eight  or 
more  (provided  the  number  of  thirty  were  not  exceeded)  by  the 
Provost.  They  are  now  admitted  annually  by  an  examination 
(see  "  Sizarships"),  and  the  number  is  not  limited  to  thirty. 


20  COLtfcGfe   CHAftQteS. 


COLLEGE  CHARGES. 

L  Undergraduate  Fees. — Before  the  name  of  any  Student  can  be 
placed  upon  the  College  Books,  the  amount  of  Entrance  Fees 
specified  below  must  be  paid  to  the  Junior  Bursar.  The  pay- 
ment must  be  made  within  one  week  of  the  declaration  of  the 
result  of  the  Entrance  Examination.  Fees  not  paid  within  the 
specified  time  are  subject  to  the  Tardy  Payment  charge  of  3s.  per 
week,  and  if  not  paid  within  six  weeks  of  the  declaration,  the 
Entrance  Docket  is  cancelled.  In  the  case,  however,  of  those 
who  intend  to  present  themselves  at  a  Term  Examination  on  the 
day  following  the  days  of  Entrance,  the  payment  must  be  made 
on  the  last  dat/  of  the  Entrance  Examination, 

The  following  statements  contain  the  practice  with  regard  to 
Arts  Fees  ; 

(a).  For  Pensioners,  the  Entrance  and  half-yearly  Fees  are 
fifteen  pounds  and  ten  guineas  respectively ;  for  Fellow-Com- 
moners, thirty  pounds  and  twenty  guineas  respectively,  and  for 
Filii  Nobiliwn,  sixty  pounds  and  forty  guineas  respectively. 
Sizars  pay  £1  Is.  Sd.  Entrance  Fee,  and  are  exempt  from  half- 
yearly  Fees. 

Pensioners  who  have  entered  before  31st  December,  1920,  are 
charged  half-yearly  fees  of  eight  guineas  . 

(i).  Students  who  enter  after  the  March  quarter  in  any  year 
and  present  themselves  at  the  Trinitj'  Term  Examination  in 
May,  or  the  Trinity  Lectures,  or  the  Supplemental  Hilary  Term 
Examination  in  June,  or  the  Michaelmas  Term  Examination  in 
October,  must  pay  the  first  half-yearly  fee  before  presenting 
themselves  for  any  Term  Examination  or  Lectures  ;  and  they 
must  pay  a  second  half-yearly  Fee  at  the  end  of  October 

Students  who  enter  after  the  March  quarter,  and  do  not  present 
themselves  for  any  of  the  above  Examinations  or  Lectures,  pay 
.the  first  half-yearly  Fee  in  the  April  of  the  succeeding  j'ear. 

The  names  of  Students  who  enter  between  the  end  of  March 
Quarter  and  the  1st  of  November  are  not  placed  upon  the  College 
Books  unless  the  payment  to  the  Junior  Bursar  entitles  them  to  be 
put  in  the  existing  Junior  Freshman  Class. 

(c).  A  Student  who  goes  through  his  Course  in  the  regular  way 
{i.e.  without  dropping  a  Class)  will  pay  to  the  Junior  Bursar,  in 
addition  to  the  Entrance  Fee,  eight  half-yearly  Fees,  payable  in 
April  and  October  in  each  year ;  and  no  Student  can  rise  to  the 
standing  of  a  Candidate  Bachelor  until  he  has  made  the  last  of 
these  half-yearly  payments.  Students  should  remember  that  the 
fee  of  two  pounds  for  the  conferring  of  the  Degree  must  be  paid  to 
the  Junior  Bursar  on  or  before  the  day  preceding  the  Commence- 
ments at  which  they  present  themselves. 


COLLEGE  CHAKGE8.  21 

Xo  Student  will  be  allowed  to  be  a  Candidate  for  Moderatorship, 
or  at  the  Special  B.  A.  Degree  Examination  in  Trinity  Term, 
unless  his  Fees  for  the  current  half-year  shall  have  been  paid 
before  the  first  day  of  Examination. 

The  half-yearly  Fees  become  due  at  the  end  of  the  March  and 
September  quarters,  but  Students  are  allowed  to  delay  the  pay- 
ment till  the  Friday  before  the  first  Saturday  in  May  or  November 
respectively.  Fees  despatched  by  post  are  counted  as  received  on 
the  day  on  which  they  are  posted.  A  Student  sending  Fees  by  post 
should  state  his  Class  and  Tutor,  in  addition  to  his  own  name. 

Half-yearly  Fees  should  be  paid  on  or  before  the  Friday  which 
precedes  the  first  Saturday  of  May  or  November,  and  any  Student 
whose  Fees  are  not  paid  on  tliat  day  must  pay  with  them  the 
Tardy  Payment  charge  of  3s.  for  that  and  every  succeeding  Friday 
in  May  or  November  for  which  the  Fees  remain  unpaid,  until  the 
first  Saturdays  of  June  and  December,  on  which  days  the  names 
of  all  Students  whose  Fees  have  not  been  paid  are  struck  off  the 
books,  and  can  only  be  replaced  on  payment  of  a  Fee  of  15s.,  in 
addition  to  the  half-yearly  Fee. 

In  addition  to  the  half-yearly  Fees,  some  Students  incur  Inci- 
dental Expenses,  due  as  Rent  of  Chambers,  Commons,  Punish- 
ments, and  so  forth,  and  these  must  be  paid  to  the  Junior  Bursar, 
at  the  end  of  each  quarter. 

Sizars,  whose  incidental  expenses  are  not  paid  witliin  a  fort- 
night from  the  date  on  which  their  accounts  are  furnished,  are 
forthwith  struck  off  the  Books,  and  their  Sizarships  vacated. 

(d).  Students  who  drop  a  year,  whether  from  inability  to  keep 
the  requisite  Terms,  or  from  any  other  cause,  should  always  con- 
sult their  Tutors  before  paying  the  half-yearly  Fees  then  due,  or 
next  to  become  due  ;  and  when  so  doing,  they  should  state 
whether  they  belong  to,  attend,  or  purpose  to  join,  any  of  the  Pro- 
fessional Schools. 

(e).  A  Student  whose  name  has  gone  off  the  books  can  always  re- 
place in  any  Class  in  which  the  Terms  he  has  kept  entitle  him  to  be 
placed,  provided  he  pays  the  replacement  Fee  of  15s.,  and  that  the 
half-yearly  payment  or  payments  which  he  makes  on  replacement, 
taken  with  those  which  he  has  previously  made,  include  all  those 
paid  in  regular  course  by  the  Students  in  the  Class  which  he  joins 
on  replacing,  viz.  one  half-yearly  Fee  in  the  April  and  one  in  the 
October  of  each  Freshman  and  Sophister  year  for  which  he  claims 
credit.  But  it  is  especially  to  be  observed  that  if,  in  the  April  or 
October  of  any  year,  a  Student  who  is  not  allowed  by  the  Senior 
Lecturer  to  keep  his  Class,  should  nevertheless  pay  the  half-yearly 
Fee  then  due,  such  payment  does  not  count  as  a  payment  for  the 
April  or  October  of  the  Class  from  tvhich  he  is  put  down,  but  as  a 
repetition  of  the  payment  previously  made  by  him  as  a  member  of 
the  Class  to  which  he  is  put  down,  and  such  payments  are  not 
taken  account  of  in  determining  the  amount  to  be  paid  on  replace- 
ment. 


22  COLLEGE   CHABOES. 

In  determining  the  time  for  which  the  name  of  a  StucJent  who 
replaces  remains  on  the  Books  without  further  payment,  the  half- 
yearly  Fee  paid  on  replacement  is  considered  as  having  been  paid 
at  the  date  on  which  it  became  due  by  the  members  of  the  Class 
which  the  Student  joins.  Thus  a  payment  made  after  March  21st 
will  keep  the  Student's  name  on  the  Books  till  the  first  Saturday 
in  December,  unless  it  counts  as  a  payment  made  in  the  previous 
half  year,  in  which  case  the  name  goes  off  on  the  first  Saturday 
in  June. 

Replacement. — A  Replacement  Fee  of  fifteen  shillings  must 
always  be  paid  to  the  Junior  Bursar  for  the  replacement  of 
the  name  of  any  Student  which  has  been  removed  from  the 
Books. 

In  addition,  the  full  amount  of  the  College  Fees  must  be  paid, 
see  (e)  above,  except  in  the  following  cases : — 

1.  Keplacement  for  the  purpose  of  getting  Degrees  conferred. 

2.  Graduates  of  the  University  are  allowed  to  go  in  for  the  Final 
Examination  of  the  Divinity  School,  and  Students  who  liave  passed  the 
B.A.  Examination  are  allowed  to  go  in  for  the  Final  Examination  of  the 
Engineeiing  School,  on  payment  of  a  Liceat  ad  Exnminandum  Fee  of 
one  guinea.  The  names  of  Students  so  replaced  are  removed  from  the 
Books  immediately  after  the  Examination. 

3.  Graduates  of  the  University  are  permitted  to  replace  their  names  on 
the  Books,  during  the  first  year  from  taking  the  Degree  of  B.A.,  without 
payment  of  the  College  Fees,  for  the  purpose  of  competing  for  any 
Prizes  which  are  open  to  Students  in  their  Bachelor  years.  The  names 
of  any  Students  so  replaced  are  removed  from  the  Books  immediately 
after  the  Examination. 

During  the  second  and  third  year  to  M.A.  standing,  they  must  pay  a 
full  half-year's  fees. 

In  the  case  of  all  Prize  Examinations  at  which,  under  existing 
Rules,  Students  presenting  themselves  for  Examination  are  required  to 
have  their  names  on  the  College  Books,  the  list  of  Prizes  awarded  shall 
be  certified  by  the  Junior  Bursar  before  being  laid  before  the  Board  for 
confirmation. 

4.  See  Divinity  School,  §  vi.,  for  rules  with  regard  to  Theological 
Exhibitions. 

When  a  Student's  name  is  put  on  the  College  Hooks  in  virtue 
of  Terms  kept  in  another  University,  the  fee  of  fifteen  shillings  is 
charged,  but  as  a  Kegistration  Fee,  not  as  a  Replacement  Fee. 

II.  Charges  for  Doctors  in  the  several  Faculties,  Masters,  and 
Members  of  the  Senate. — Resident  Doctors  and  Masters  pay  the 
sum  of  £4  half-yearly.  The  regulations  for  payment  are  the  same 
as  those  already  given  under  the  head  of  Undergraduates. 

The  Fees  payable  by  Members  of  the  Senate  are  regulated  by 
Decrees  of  the  Board  as  follows : — 

Whereas,  by  the  Royal  Letters  Patent  bearing  date  the  24th  day  of 
July,  in  the  twenty-first  year  of  the  reign  of  Her  most  Gracious  Majesty 


CHARGES   FOK    MEMBEK.S   OF   SENATE.  23 

Queen  Victoria,  it  is  amongst  other  things  enacted,  that  the  Senate  of  the 
University  of  Dublin  shall,  as  heretofore,  consist  of  the  Chancellor,  or,  in 
his  absence,  the  Vice- Chancellor,  or  Pro-Vice-Chancellor  for  the  time 
being,  and  of  such  Doctors  and  Masters  of  Arts  of  the  University  as  shall 
have  and  keep  their  names  on  the  Books  of  Trinity  College,  in  accordance 
with  such  regulations  and  conditions  as  the  Provost  and  Senior  Fellows 
of  the  said  College  shall  enact : 

We,  therefore,  the  Provost  and  Senior  Fellows,  in  pursuance  of  the 
powers  vested  in  us,  do  hereby  enact  and  Dkcrke  : 

1.  That  no  change  shall  be  made  in  the  Fees  heretofore  payable  by 
Doctors  and  Masters  holding  Rooms  in  the  College,  or  in  attendance  on 
Collegiate  or  Professional  Lectures,  or  presenting  themselves  at  Exami- 
nations. 

2.  That  all  Doctors  or  Masters  of  Arts,  whose  names  are  now  on  the 
College  Books  (i.  e.  on  January  31,  1872),  and  who  are  not  resident  nor 
in  attendance  on  Lectures,  as  aforesaid,  shall  be  permitted  to  retain  their 
names  on  the  Books  of  the  College  as  Members  of  the  Senate,  without 
further  payment. 

3.  That  all  Doctors  or  Masters  of  Arts  (except  as  hereafter  provided), 
whose  names  are  not  on  the  College  Books,  shall  be  required  to  pay,  on 
replacing  their  names,  the  accustomed  charge  of  £4  15*.  for  the  half- 
year  in  which  such  replacement  is  made ;  after  which  their  names  shall 
be  retained  on  the  College  Books  as  Members  of  the  Senate,  without 
further  payment. 

4.  That  the  names  of  all  Doctors  and  Masters  of  Arts,  who  have  been 
University  Students,  or  First  Senior  Moderators  who  have  obtained 
a  large  Gold  Medal,  or  Senior  Moderators  who  have  obtained  two  Gold 
Medals,  shall  be  replaced  and  retained  on  the  College  Books  as  Members 
of  the  Senate,  without  charge. 

5.  That  Ex- Fellows  of  the  College,  according  to  ancient  privilege,  shall 
be  permitted  to  retain  their  names  on  the  College  Books  without  any  charge. 

6.  That  the  Members  for  the  University  in  Parliament,  and  ex-Mem- 
bers, shall  be  permitted  to  retain  their  names  on  the  College  Books  free 
of  all  chaige. 

Fees  for  Lectures  or  Laboratory  Instruction . — Where  a  fee  is 
chargeable  for  attendance  on  a  course  of  Arts  Lectures  or  of 
Laboratory  Instruction,  it  must  be  paid  to  the  Junior  Bursar  not 
later  than  three  days  after  the  day  fixed  for  the  commencement  of 
Arts  Lectures  or  of  attendance  at  the  Laboratory,  and  the  receipt 
must  be  produced  to  the  Professor  or  Lecturer.  If  not  paid  within 
that  time,  a  tardy  payment  fine  of  3s.  will  be  imposed.  Wo 
Student  is  permitted  to  attend  sucli  a  course  if  his  fee  has  not 
been  paid  within  six  days  from  the  commencement  of  Lectures  or 
of  his  attendance  at  the  Laboratory.  Professors  and  Lecturers 
are  directed  to  enforce  this  rule. 


24  EESIDENCE,  AND  DUTIES  OF  KESIDENT   STDDENT8, 


RESIDENCE,  AND  DUTIES  OF  llESIDENT  STUDENTS. 

Residence,  as  a  part  of  Academic  discipline,  is  not  enforced  in  the 
University  of  Dublin,  but  residence  either  in  the  city  or  in  the 
College  is  indirectly  necessary. 

Rooms. — Chambers  in  the  College  are  granted  by  the  Provost  on 
application  from  the  Tutor  of  the  Student  who  proposes  to  reside. 
On  obtaining  Rooms,  a  sum  of  money  is  deposited  with  the  Registrar 
of  Chambers,  which  is  intended  as  security  against  any  injury  that 
they  may  sustain,  and  is  returned  on  vacating  the  Kooms,  if  all 
claims  of  the  College  be  first  satisfied.  The  deposit  for  Rooms  varies 
from  £12  to  £32  ;  and  the  annual  rent  varies  from  £5  to  £24.  Most 
of  these  Chambers  are  intended  to  accommodate  two  Students,  in 
which  case  each  Student  in  occupation  pays  only  half  rent  and  half 
deposit.  If,  however,  a  Student,  from  any  cause,  should  be  the 
sole  occupant  of  such  Rooms,  he  is  always  liable  for  the  entire  rent 
during  whatever  time  the  sole  occupation  continues. 

A  list  of  the  Chambers  vacant  within  the  College  is  hung  up  at 
the  Chief  Steward's  lodge,  near  the  Gate.  Students  can  see  the 
different  sets  of  vacant  Chambers  on  application  to  the  Clerk  of 
the  Works,  and  when  they  have  decided  which  sets  they  prefer, 
they  should  communicate  with  their  Tutors,  giving  a  list  contain- 
ing the  particulars  of  two  or  three  sets  of  Chambers,  in  the  order 
in  which  they  prefer  them,  so  that  in  case  the  Rooms  first  applied 
for  are  granted  to  other  Students,  the  Tutors  can  apply  for  the 
other  Rooms.  An  application  for  a  double  set  of  Chambers  must 
be  made  on  behalf  of  two  Students  jointly.  If  the  Rooms  applied 
for  be  granted,  the  deposit  must  be  paid  to  the  Registrar  of 
Chambers  within  a  fortnight,  or  else  the  right  to  the  Rooms  lapses. 
The  deposit  is  returned  when  the  Rooms  are  vacated  and  the  keys 
given  up  to  the  Chief  Steward. 

No  Student  is  allowed  to  reside  in  Chambers  registered  in  the 
name  of  another,  without  a  written  permission  from  the  Provost, 
stating  the  period  during  which  such  temporary  occupation  may 
continue.  The  Chambers  of  any  Student  who  allows  another 
person  to  occupy  them,  either  wholly  or  in  part,  without  such 
permission,  are  immediately  declared  vacant. 

The  following  Regulations  concerning  the  occupation  of  Cham- 
bers have  been  made  by  the  Board  : — 

1 .  The  Chambers  of  Resident  Students,  except  Scholars,  and  Students 
attending  Lectures  in  one  of  the  Professional  Schools,  are  to  be  vacated 
at  the  close  of  the  Quailer  in  which  they  shall  be  of  standing  to  be 
udniilted  to  the  B.A.  Degree. 

2.  The  Chambers  of  Ex-Scholars  and  Ex-Sizars  shall  be  vacated  at 
the  close  of  the  September  Quarter  next  after  the  expiration  of  their 
Scholarships  and  Sizarships. 


EE8IDENCE,  AND  DUTIES  OF  RESIDENT  STUDENTS.  25 

3.  Students  attending  Lectures  in  the  Professional  Schools  are 
permitted  to  retain  their  Chambers  until  the  first  Saturday  in  June  of 
their  Junior  Bachelor  year,  but  not  longer,  without  special  permission 
from  the  Provost. 

4.  Graduates  above  tlic  standing  of  Junior  Bachelor,  who  may  obtain 
permission  to  occupy  Chambers,  pay  a  half-yearly  Fee  of  £5  5s.  in 
addition  to  the  usual  rent. 

5.  No  Student  is  permitted  to  retain  his  Chambers  during  a  Term  in 
which  he  is  not  in  residence,  without  special  pemiission  from  the 
Provost. 

6.  Students  who  are  permitted  to  retain  their  Chambers  under  EuleS 
will  be  charged  each  Term  full  Commons  Fund  and  full  servants'  wages 
for  six  weeks. 

7.  The  Rooms  of  Students  whose  quarterly  accounts  are  not  paid 
within  a  fortnight  of  the  date  on  which  they  are  furnished  by  the 
Registrar  of  Chambers  shall  be  declared  vacant 

8.  The  Registrar  of  Chambers  is  empowered  to  charge  Students,  who 
may  change  their  Rooms,  and  neglect  to  give  the  keys  of  their  vacated 
Rooms  to  the  Clerk  of  the  Works,  the  rents  of  both  sets  of  Chambers 
until  the  deposit  be  transferred. 

9.  Students  who  fail  to  vacate  their  Rooms  within  a  week  after  they 
have  received  notice  to  quit  from  the  Registrar  of  Chambers,  shall  be 
liable  to  forfeiture  of  their  Deposit,  or  of  such  portion  of  it  as  the 
Registrar  may  determine. 

10.  Students  living  by  the  Provost's  permission  in  the  rooms  of 
Fellows  or  Professors  occupying  more  than  one  ordinary  set  of  double 
chambers  are  required  to  pay  rent  (the  amount  to  be  fixed  by  the  Senior 
Bursal),  and  to  conform  to  all  iirraugements  as  to  Commons  and  servants 
whii^h  are  binding  on  Students  generally.  All  Students  living  in  the 
rooms  of  Fellows  or  Professors  must  conform  to  the  arrangements  as 
to  Commons  unless  expressly  exempted. 

Attendance  on  Divine  Service. — All  Students  who  are  members 
of  the  Church  of  Ireland  or  England,  and  who  reside  within  a 
distance  of  one  mile  and  one-half  from  the  College,  are  required  to 
attend  Divine  Service  in  the  College  Chapel  on  Sunday  morning. 
The  Junior  Dean  is  directed  to  bring  the  names  of  such  Students 
as  are  negligent  in  their  attendance  under  the  notice  of  the 
Provost  or  Senior  Dean.  Students  resident  within  the  College, 
who  neglect  to  comply  with  the  regulation  on  this  point,  are 
liable  to  he  deprived  of  their  Rooms. 

The  hours  of  Divine  Service  in  the  College  Chapel  are  the 
following: — On  Sundays,  Morning  Prayer  is  read  at  10  a.m.,  and 
livening  Prayer  at  7  o'clock.  On  week-days,  Morning  Prayer 
is  read  at  8.30  a.m.,  and  Evening  Prayer  at  7  o'clock.  The 
Order  for  Morning  and  Evening  Prayer  is  shortened  in  the 
Chapel  on  week-days,  by  the  omission  of  certain  prescribed 
portions.  On  Sundays  all  Students  must  wear  surplices,  Avith 
the  hoods  belonging  to  their  Degrees,  if  they  be  Graduates. 

The  Holy  Communion  is  administered  on  Sundays  during  full 
Term  at  8  a.m.,  and  after  Morning  Prayer  on  Sundays  fixed  by 
the  Provost. 

c 


26  EESIDENCE,  AND  DUTIES  OF  KE8IDENT  STUDENTS. 

After  Morning  Prayer  on  Sundays,  a  Sermon  is  delivered  by  one 
of  the  Professors  of  Divinity  or  one  of  the  University  Preachers 

for  the  year.  ,      -n     , 

Students  in  residence  who  are  members  of  the  Presbyterian 
Church  in  Ireland,  are  required  to  lodge  with  the  Junior  Dean 
a  certihcate  of  attendance  upon  one  of  the  Presbyterian  Churches 
of  the  city  signed  by  the  Minister  of  that  Church. 

Corrections.— ki  half-past  ten  o'clock  on  Saturday  mornings, 
the  Junior  Dean  attends  in  the  Hall,  and  reads  out  the  names  of 
all  Students  who  have  been  punished  for  neglect  of  duties  or  other 
offences  during  the  week.  It  is  the  interest  of  those  who  can 
excuse  themselves  to  be  present ;  and  if  their  excuses  are  admitted 
by  the  Dean,  the  fines  are  taken  off. 

Commons  of  Resident  Students. — All  Students  resident  in 
College,  unless  specially  excused  by  the  Provost,  must  dine  in  the 
Commons  Hall,  except  during  the  summer  vacation.  They  must 
take  care  to  put  their  name  on  Commons  by  application  to  the 
Clerk  of  the  Buttery,  as  soon  as  they  come  into  residence. 

The  Rules  now  in  force  with  regard  to  Commons  are  as  fol- 
lows : — 

1.  That  all  Fellow-Commoners  and  Pensioners  under  the  standing  of 
M.A.,  and  holding  Chambers  in  the  College,  be  uniformly  charged,  in 
addition  to  the  Chamber-rent  now  paid  to  the  Registrar  of  Chambers,  a 
certain  specific  sum  per  week  for  certain  portions  of  the  year ;  and  that 
the  sums  thus  accruing  be  considered  as  contributions  to  a  Commons  Fund. 

2.  That  these  charges  be,  for  each  Fellow-Commoner,  ten  shillings 
and  six  pence  per  week,  and  for  each  Pensioner  seven  shillings ;  said 
charges  to  be  levied  for  the  weeks  in  each  Term  in  which  Undergraduate 
Lectures  shall  be  given,  or  for  so  many  of  those  weeks  in  any  Term  as 
the  Student  holds  Chambers  without  actually  giving  up  the  keys  of  the 
same  to  the  person  entitled  to  receive  them. 

3.  That  these  charges  be  made  by  the  Clerk  of  the  Buttery  Books, 
from  the  Quarterly  Chamber-rent  list  furnished  by  the  Registrar  of 
Chambers,  against  all  persons  liable  to  the  same  ;  and  be  introduced  in 
the  quarterly  accounts  payable  to  the  Junior  Bursar,  among  the 
incidentals  of  the  past  quarter  under  the  name  of  Commons  Fund. 
All  persons,  however,  to  whom  Chambers  may  be  granted  within  any  of 
the  periods  above  specified,  are  to  be  considered  liable  to  these  charges 
from  the  date  the  Rooms  are  assigned. 

4.  That  the  weekly  sums  thus  charged  be  allowed  in  the  regular  Com- 
mons Charge  to  each  Student,  and  the  remainder,  or  variable  part  of  the 
Commons  Charge,  be  payable  to  the  Clerk  of  the  Buttery  Books. 

5.  Students  residing  habitually  at  a  distance  from  Dublin,  and  coming 
to  Dublin  to  attend  the  Examinations  of  their  Class,  are  allowed  to  put 
their  names  on  Commons  on  the  days  on  which  these  Examinations  are 
held. 

6.  The  Junior  Dean  shall  be  required  to  impose  a  fine  of  5s.  a  week 
upon  all  Students,  actually  resident  in  College  whose  names  shall  not 
be  on  Commons  at  all  times  except  during  the  long  Vacation;  it  being 
understood  that  the  charge  for  Commons  Fund  shall  be  considered  an 


RESIDENCE,  AND  DUTIES  OF  RESIDENT  STUDENTS.  27 

equivalent  to  this  fine  during  the  week  in  which  Commons  Fund  is 
imposed. 

7.  No  Student's  name  shall  he  placed  on  the  Commons  List  without 
previous  payment  to  the  Clerk  of  the  Buttery  of  the  amount  due  for  th6 
period  during  which  his  name  is  placed  on  Commons.  This  rule  is  to 
apply  in  the  case  of  sons  of  Fellows  and  Professors. 

Regulations  with  reference  to  Commons. 

Long  Commons. — During  the  period  known  as  "  Long  Commons,"  a 
Student  may  put  his  name  on  Commons  on  any  day  of  the  week,  and 
will  be  charged  at  the  rate  of  2».  per  day  for  the  remaining  portion  of 
the  week. 

For  the  remaining  weeks  of  "Long  Commons,"  his  name  must  be  on 
Commons,  and  he  must  pay  accordingly. 

All  Students  are  expected  to  dine  on  Commons  every  day  ;  but  those 
who  wish  to  dine  M-ith  their  friends  on  Sunday  shall  pay  12s.  for  the 
week  instead  of  14s.  If  the  Student  has  the  permission  of  the  Junior 
Dean,  in  exceptional  cases,  to  dine  with  his  friends  on  Saturday  as  well 
as  Sunday,  he  shall  pay  10«.  instead  of  14s. 

Short  Commons. — For  the  period  known  as  "  Short  Commons  "  [i.e., 
the  six  or  seven  weeks  of  lecture  term),  a  Student  joining  during  the 
first  week  is  required  to  pay  for  the  whole  period  in  one  sum.  If, 
however,  he  does  not  join  until  the  second  or  any  subsequent  week  he 
is  required  on  joining  to  pay  in  one  sum  for  tlie  whole  of  the  week  in 
which  he  joins,  and  for  the  whole  of  ihe  remaining  period  of  Short 
Commons. 

A  Student  is  required  to  put  his  name  on  Commons  before  1  p.m. 
Any  Student  dining  without  having  put  his  name  on  Commons  is  liable 
to  a  fine  of  2s.  M.  for  each  occasion. 

When  there  are  two  halls,  every  Student  presenting  himself  for 
dinner  at  an  hour  other  than  that  at  which  he  is  entitled  to  dine, 
without  giving  notice  at  the  office  before  11  a.m.,  will  be  fined  5«.  on 
each  occasion. 

Under  no  circumstances  can  a  Student  dine  more  than  twice  a  week 
at  an  hour  other  than  his  standing  allows  him.  Freshmen  dine  at  the 
first  hall  ;  Sopliisters  and  Graduates  at  the  second. 

If  a  Student  desires  to  dine  with  his  friends  on  Sunday  during  Short 
Commons,  he  shall  pay  6s.  for  the  week  instead  of  7s.  If  he  has 
the  permission  of  the  Junior  Dean  to  dine  out  with  his  friends  for 
Saturday  as  well  as  Sunday,  he  shall  pay  os.  for  the  week  instead  of  7s. 

Note. — In  cases  where  a  Student  wishes  to  leave  College,  for  reasons 
which  the  Junior  Dean  considers  sufficient,  such  Student  will  be  allowed 
to  keep  his  name  on  Commons  for  Is.  a  day  during  Short  Commons, 
and  2«.  a  day  during  Long  Commons  up  to  the  day  on  which  he  leaves. 

Charges  for  Servants. — 1.  Every  Student  in  whose  name  chambers 
are  registered  is  charged  at  the  rate  of  one  guinea  per  quarter  whether 
he  is  actually  in  residence  or  not. 

2.  For  every  week  or  portion  of  a  week  of  actual  re.=iidenee  a  Student 
occupying  single  rooms,  or  in  solitary  occupation  of  double  rooms,  is 
charged  4s.,  and  Students  occupying  double  rooms  are  each  charged 
3s.  Gd. 

C2 


28  RESIDENCE,  AND  DUTIES  OF  RESIDENT  STUDENTS. 

3.  Should  a  Student,  from  any  cause  whatsoever,  fail  to  be  in 
residence  for  at  least  six  weeks  in  any  quarter  other  than  the  Long 
Vacation  quarter,  he  will  be  charged  a  minimum  of  six  of  the  weekly 
payments  specified  in  the  foregoing  rule. 

4.  The  servants  are  paid  by  the  College,  and  they  are  engaged  on  the 
understanding  that  they  are  not  to  look  for  extra  payments  from 
Students. 

If,  however,  a  Student  has  been  permitted  by  tlie  Junior  Dean  to 
receive  a  guest  in  his  rooms,  such  Student  is  responsible  for  paying  the 
servant  for  the  extra  duties  involved. 

In  addition  to  Commons  Fund  and  charges  for  servants,  the  quarterly 
accounts  include  milk  accounts  and  charges  for  gas. 

Night-Roll. — All  Students  resident  in  the  College,  below  the 
standing  of  B.A.,  must  attend  night-roll,  which  is  called  at  nine 
o'clock.  After  night-roll  no  Student  is  permitted  to  pass  out 
of  College  without  a  written  order. 

Exemption  from  attendance  at  night-roll  may  be  granted  on 
the  ground  of  diligence  and  seniority.  The  extent  of  this  indul- 
gence is  decided  by  the  Junior  Dean,  subject  to  the  approval  of 
the  Provost  and  the  Senior  Dean.  Those  who  wish  to  remain 
out  of  College  after  twelve  o'clock  must  previously  obtain  special 
permission. 

Houses  of  Residence  for  Students. — It  is  compulsory  for  all 
Students  attending  Lectures  to  reside  either  (1)  in  College ;  or 
(2)  with  their  parents,  near  relatives,  or  guardians  ;  or  (3)  in  one 
of  the  registered  houses  of  residence.  If  a  Student  wishes  to 
obtain  credit  for  Lectures  while  living  in  an  unregistered  house, 
he  must  ask  permission  through  his  Tutor  from  the  House  of 
Kesidence  Committee  not  later  than  the  second  week  of  Lectures, 
that  they  may  report  forthwith  to  tlie  Senior  Lecturer.  The 
following  are  the  members  of  the  Committee  : — the  Senior  Dean  ; 
the  Junior  Dean ;  J.  Joly,  sc.d.  ;  A.  F.  Dixon,  sc.d.  ;  F.  La  T. 
Godfrey,  m.a.  ;  W.  C.  Stevenson,  m.d.,  Hon.  Sec. 

Any  householder  in  or  near  Dublin  may  apply  to  any  member 
of  this  Committee  to  have  his  (or  her)  name  placed  on  the  books 
of  the  Committee  as  willing  to  afford  accommodation  for  students. 
These  books  will  be  accessible  to  students  seeking  lodgings. 

Every  house,  before  being  entered  on  the  Committee's  books, 
must  have  been  inspected  by  the  Sanitary  Inspector,  and  passed 
by  the  House  of  Residence  Committee.  The  householder  must 
also  satisfy  the  Committee  as  to  the  general  suitability  of  the  liouse 
for  Students  by  giving  suitable  references  in  writing.  These 
references  may  be  addressed  to  any  member  of  the  Committee. 
Householders  are  not  charged  any  fee  for  having  their  names 
entered  on  the  Committee's  books,  but  will  be  required  to  furnish 
an  account  of  the  accommodation  they  can  supply,  and  their 
terras.  It  will  be  in  the  discretion  of  the  Committee  to  remove 
from  their  books  the  address  of  any  house  of  residence  at  any  time. 


EESIDENCE,  AND  DITTIES  OF    RESIDENT  STUDENTS.  29 

lu  order  to  retaia  their  names  on  the  books,  householders 
must  comply  with  the  following  rules  : — 

1.  To  forward  to  the  Hon.  Secretary  of  the  House  of  Residence 
Committee  on  November  20th,  February  20th,  and  May  20th  of  each 
year,  a  list  of  the  Trinity  College  Students  who  are  at  the  time  in  their 
houses,  or  who  have  resided  there  since  the  last  return  was  sent  in. 

2.  To  inform  the  Hon.  Secretary  in  the  months  of  September  and 
December,  and  at  Easter,  what  accommodation  they  can  offer  for 
Students.  In  absence  of  this  notification  it  will  be  assumed  that  the 
house  is  fully  occupied. 

3.  To  notiy  immediately  the  Hon.  Secretary  of  any  case  of  serious 
illness  occurring  in  the  house. 

4.  To  give  facility  to  members  of  the  Committee  for  inspecting  the 
house,  and  to  produce  a  recent  sanitary  certificate  of  the  house  if 
required. 


(     30     ) 


(^oxmt  XXX  ^xtn^ 


ENTRANCE. 

1.  Thk  mode  of  admission  into  this  University  is  by  passing 
an  Examination. 

The  Senior  Lecturer  is  authorized  to  allow  a  Graduate  in  Arts  of  any 
University  chartered  under  the  Crown  to  have  his  name  placed  on  the 
College  Books,  on  payment  of  the  Entrance  Fee,  without  passing  the 
Matriculation  Examination. 

Candidates  who  have  passed  in  the  Senior  Grade  Examination  held 
under  the  Board  of  Intermediate  Education,  Ireland,  or  in  any  other 
Examination  regarded  by  the  Senior  Lecturer  as  equivalent  thereto,  are 
qualified  for  Entrance  in  Trinity  College  on  passing  a  further  Examina- 
tion in  those  subjects,  if  any,  of  the  Trinity  College  Entrance  Examina- 
tion which  are  not  included  in  those  in  which  they  have  passed  at  the 
Intermediate  Examination,  or  the  Examination  approved  by  the  Senior 
Lecturer. 

The  Special  Army  Certificate  of  Education  is  accepted  in  lieu  of  the 
Entrance  Examination,  provided  it  covers  Latin  and  one  modern 
language  other  than  English.  If  it  does  not  cover  these  two  languages, 
the  Candidate  will  be  required  to  pass  the  Entrance  Examination  in  the 
languages  or  language  which  the  Certificate  does  not  cover. 

All  persons  desirous  of  becoming  Members  of  the  College  and 
of  the  University  must,  at  their  Entrance,  place  themselves  under 
one  of  the  Tutor  Fellows  who  receive  Pupils.  The  Collegiate 
interest  of  Pupils  are  under  the  guardianship  of  tlieir  Tutors, 
and  to  them  all  applications  for  information,  whether  before  or 
after  Entrance,  sliould  be  made.  Applications  to  the  Board  or 
to  the  Senior  Lecturer  must  come  from  students  not  directly, 
but  through  their  respective  Tutors.  Students  may  enter  as 
Fellow- Commoners  or  Pensioners.  But  a  Nobleman,  the  son  of 
a  Nobleman,  or  a  Baronet,  may  enter  as  Nobilis,  Filius  Nobilis,  or 
Eqiies.  Students  of  limited  means  may  compete  for  Sizarships, 
and,  if  successful,  may  enter  as  Sizars.  Students  entering  after 
March  21,  and  at  or  before. the  Autumn  Entrance  in  October,  are 
permitted  to  join  the  Junior  Freshman  Class  which  was  formed 
in  the  previous  November,  on  payment  of  the  half-year's  fees  due 
by  members  of  that  class,  in  addition  to  the  Entrance  Fee  (see 
under  '  Saving  a  Year').  • 

There  are  live  Matriculation  or  Entrance  Examinations  in 
the  year,  each  lasting  for  two  days.  Of  these,  the  Midsummer 
Entrance  in  Trinity  Term,  and  the  Autumn  Entrance  at  the 
commencement  of  Michaelmas  Term,  are  known  as  the  Principal 


PRINCIPAL  AND  OEDlNAUt  ENTEANCES.  3l 

Entrance  Examinations.  At  all  Entrance  Examinations  candi- 
dates who  obtain  65  per  cent,  and  upwards  are  given  High  Places. 
Candidates  who  are  given  High  I'laces  are  arranged  in  order  of 
merit,  and  their  names,  together  with  those  of  the  Schools  from 
which  they  present  themselves,  are  published  at  the  conclusion 
of  the  Examination.  The  Senior  Lecturer  is  authorized  to  issue 
Special  Certificates  to  those  who  are  so  selected. 

The  two  Principal  Entrances  and  two  of  the  other  Entrance 
Examinations  are  held  on  the  days  immediately  previous  to  the 
four  Examinations  of  the  Junior  Freshman  Class  (including  the 
Supplemental  Hilary  Examination  in  June),  so  as  to  enable 
Students  from  a  distance  to  pass  a  Terra  Examination  as  well  as 
the  Entrance  without  unnecessary  loss  of  time.  The  fifth 
Entrance  is  held  immediately  before  the  Michaelmas  Lectures 
begin.  The  dates  of  these  Examinations  may  be  found  in  the 
Almanac,  and  are  also  given  under  the  heading  *  Days  of 
Examination.'  In  addition,  the  Senior  Lecturer  grants  a  Special 
Examination  to  such  Students  as  are  unable  to  present  themselves 
at  the  regular  Examinations,  on  reasonable  grounds  being  given. 

Candidates  who  have  passed  a  Public  Entrance  Examination  to  the 
salisfaction  of  tlie  Senior  Lecturer  are  given  a  Large  Entrance  CertiBcate  ; 
all  other  candidates,  who  are  allowed  to  proceed  with  their  course,  are 
given  a  Small  Certificate,  which  cannot  be  used  as  evidence  that  they 
have  passed  the  Public  Entrance  Examination  of  Trinity  College  ;  but 
such  candidates  will  be  given  the  Large  Certificate  as  soon  as  they  shall 
have  passed  a  Term  Examination. 

The  Entrance  Examinations  commence  at  9.30  a.m. 

2.      Course  for  Principal  and  Ordinary  Entrances. 

English  Composition  ;  Arithmetic  ;  Algebra  (the  first  Four  Rules, 
Fractions,  and  Simple  Equations)  ;  Geometry,  see  below ;  English 
History  ;  Modern  Geography ;  Latin  with  Latin  Composition  ;  and  any 
one  of  the  following  Languages  : — Greek  ;  French,  About,  Sans  Dot,  Lea 
Parents  de  Bernard  (Educational  Co.  of  Ireland)  ;  German,  Gerstacker, 
Germelsbausen  (Rivington) ;  Italian,  Grillo,  La  Dolce  Favella  (Hirsch- 
feld,  London),  pp.  28-209  ;  Spanish,  Carter  and  Molloy,  Cuentos 
Castellaiios  (Harrap),  omitting  the  last  story  ;  Irish,  O'Leary,  Eisirt; 
Russian.  (For  tlie  Entrance  Course  in  Russian,  candidates  are  to  apply 
to  the  Senior  Lecturer.)  In  Greek  and  in  Latin  students  may  select  any 
two  Greek  and  any  two  Latin  authors.  (Two  books  by  tlie  same  author 
will  not  be  accepted  in  lieu  of  two  distinct  authors.)  The  quantity  of 
each  author  to  be  presented  for  examination  must  be  not  less  than  the 
equivalent  of  two  Books  of  Virgil,  or  Xenophon,  or  of  a  Greek  play. 
Candidates  will  be  examined  vivd  voce  in  the  translation,  grammar,  and 
subject-matter  of  the  works  which  they  submit.  The  Examination 
in  a  Modern  Language  will  be  partly  vivd  voce  in  the  prescribed  books,  and 
partly  by  papers,  containing  passages  (unprescribed)  for  translation  from 
these  Languages,  and  passages  for  translation  from  English  into  the  same. 

The  Course  in  Geometry*  is  that  covered  by  Euclid,  Books  i.,  ii.,  iii., 

•  In  learning  Geometry  any  of  tlie  following  books  may  be  used  instead  of  Euclid's 
Elements  :— Baiter  and  liourns,  Godfrey  and  Siddons,  Uali  and  Stevens,  Purser. 


32  COtJRSE  IN  AKTS. 

and  Book  iv.,  Props.  1,  2,  3,  4,  and  5,  with  some  additional  Elementary 
Practical  Constructions,  and  also  some  Elementary  loci.  Geometrical 
Methods  other  than  those  followed  by  Enclid  will  be  accepted,  such  as 
regarding  tangents  as  limiting  positions  of  chords,  &c.  Some  questions 
will  be  set  on  practical  constmctions,  so  that  candidates  will  have  to 
provide  themselves  with  a  ruler,  set  square,  protractor,  and  pencil 
compasses.  (A  syllabus  giving  more  detailed  information  on  the  Courie 
in  Geometry  may  be  obtained  on  application.) 

3.     Prizes  obtainable  in  connexion  with  Entrance. 

1st.  About  ten  Sizarships  annually  in  Mathematics,  Classics, 
Experimental  Science,  Natural  Science,  Modern  Languages, 
Hebrew,  and  Irish.  The  regulations  respecting  the  Course, 
Privileges,  &c.,  are  given  below. 

2nd.  Sixteen  Junior  Exhibitions,  twelve  of  £20  and  four  of  £15 
a  year,  tenable  for  twoj'ears.     See  under  '  Junior  Exhibitions.' 

3rd.  Extra  Exhibitions  or  Prizes  may  also  be  granted  by  the 
Board  to  deserving  Candidates  on  the  results  of  the  Examinations 
for  Junior  Exhibitions  and  Sizarships. 

4th.  The  Kidd  Scholarship,  value  about  £80  per  annum,  tenable 
for  four  years.  The  Examination  for  this  Scholarship  is  held 
each  fourth  year,  unless  vacancies  should  occur  oftener.  See 
under  '  Kidd  Scholarship.'  An  Examination  will  be  held  in 
1925. 

5th.  The  Charles  Wilkins  Memorial  Prize  in  Mathematics  for 
Women.     See  under  that  heading. 

6th.  Twenty-six  Entrance  Prizes,  namely,  a  First  Prize  of 
£5  and  a  Second  Prize  of  £2  in  each  of  the  following  subjects 
(provided  sufficient  merit  be  shown  by  the  Candidates) : — 


1. 

Greek  Verse. 

7. 

French. 

2. 

Latin  Verse. 

8. 

German. 

3. 

Greek  Prose. 

9. 

Hebrew." 

4. 

Latin  Prose. 

10. 

Experimental  Science 

5. 

English  Literature    and 

11. 

Natural  Science. 

Composition. 

12. 

Modern  Irish. 

6. 

English     History     and 

13. 

Scripture. 

Modern  Geography. 

A  Student  may  compete  for  one  or  more  of  these  Prizes.  The  names 
of  the  successful  Candidates,  and  the  Schools  from  which  they  present 
themselves,  are  published  at  the  conclusion  of  the  Examinations. 

These  Examinations  are  held  early  in  Michaelmas  Term,  and  are  open 
to  all  Students  who  have  not  completed  their  nineteenth  j-ear  before 
the  1st  of  June  immediately  preceding  the  Examination,  and  who  are 
commencing  the  Junior  Freshman  Year,  i.e.,  to  those  Students  Mho 
have  entered  since  March  2l8t,  and  have  not  paid  any  half-yearly  fee. 
They  commence  at  10  a.m. 

a  Hebrew  Sizars  are  not  eligible  for  this  Prize,  except  in  the  absence  of  other  desei-ving 
Candidates. 


BNTRANCE  PRIZES.  33 

The  following  Courses  have  been  appointed : — 

Enylish  Literature. 

Pancoast,  Introduction  to  English  Literature,  Part  ii.,  chapters  4 
and  5  ;  Part  iii.,  chapter  2,  and  Part  iv.,  chap.  i. 

Shakspere,  Merchant  of  Venice,  Richard  III.,  Macbeth. 

Milton,  Comus  and  Paradise  Lost,  books  iii.  and  iv. 

Mucaulay,  Essays  on  Addison,  on  Boswell's  Life  of  Johnson,  and 
on  Moore's  Life  of  Byron. 

Trench,  English  Past  and  Present. 

English  History  and  Modern  Geography. 

Gardiner,  Student's  History  of  England.  \ 

Seeley,  The  Expansion  of  England.  [     130  marks. 

Trevelyan,  England  under  the  Stuarts.  ) 

Gregory,  Structural,  Physical,  and  Comparative  \      -„  marks 
Geography,  .  .  .  .  ) 

(Students  are  recommended  to  use  Gardiner's  Atlas 
of  English  History.) 

French. 

fialzac,  Pierrette.     (Oxford  University  Press.) 

Sand,  Francois  le  Chanipi  (Oxford  Higher  French  Series). 

Hugo,  Hernani  (Oxford  Higher  French  Series). 

German . 

Schiller,  Maria  Stuart. 

Goelhe,  Eginont. 

Kurz,  Die  Humanisten  (Macmillan). 

The  merits  of  the  Candidates  in  French  and  German  will  be 
tested  by  conversation,  translation,  composition,  and  questions  in 
Grammar  and  Literary  History. 

Hebrew. 

Grammar  (including  written  exercises  on  the  paradigms  of  nouns  and 
verbs)  and  the  first  eight  Psalms. 

Modern  Irish. 
Modem  Irish  Grammar  and  Composition. 

Qn  Cpaor-Oeaman. 

A  passage  of  Irish  for  translation  at  sight. 

F,  W.  O'Connell,  Selections  from  Keating's  "Three  Shafts  of  Death  " 

C3 


34  COURSE  IN  ARTS. 


Experimental  IScience. 

The  Course  appointed  in  Experimental  Science  consists  of  two 
sub-courses,  Experimental  Physics  and  Chemistry ,  whicli  are  as 
follows  : — 

Experimental  Physics — Measurement  of  length,  area,  volume,  mass, 
and  weight ;  density,  time,  velocity,  acceleration,  and  pressure. 

Simpler  phenomena  of  Heat,  Light,  Sound,  Magnetism,  and 
Electricity. 

There  will  be  a  Practical  as  well  as  a  Written  Examination. 

Chemistry — Physical  and  Chemical  changes  of  matter — how  distin- 
guished. Elements  and  compounds.  Law  of  definite  proportions — 
Equivalents. 

Water — its  chief  physical  and  chemical  properties — its  ultimate  com- 
position— Analysis — Electrolysis — Chief  properties  of  hydrogen  and 
oxygen.  Synthesis  of  water.  Laws  of  gaseous  combination.  Elementary 
ideas  relating  to  molecules  and  atoms.  Avogadro's  law.  Water  as  a 
solvent — Natural  waters.  Peroxide  of  hydrogen.  Valence — law  of 
multiple  proportions. 

Atmospheric  Air — the  principal  substances  contained  in  it — how  they 
are  recognized — their  condition  in  air.  Relations  of  air  to  processes  of 
combustion  and  animal  respiration.  Nitrogen — its  chief  compounds 
with  oxygen  and  hydrogen.  Acids,  alkalies,  salts — their  general 
characters. 

Carbon — its  forms.  Allotropism.  The  two  oxides  of  carbon — their 
chief  physical  and  chemical  properties  and  relations.  The  hydrides  of 
carbon,  marsh  gas  and  olefiunt  gas.     Coal  gas  and  the  nature  of  flame. 

Deductions  of  formulae  and  solutions  of  simple  chemical  problems. 

At  the  Practical  part  of  the  examination,  candidates  will  be  expected 
to  recognise  one  or  more  of  the  elements  or  compounds  named  above,  or 
to  prepare  any  of  them.  They  may  also  be  asked  to  perform  simple 
quantitative  operations  illustrating  general  principles,  such  as — the 
action  of  heat  on  a  metallic  salt,  the  displacement  of  one  metal  by 
another  from  solution,  or  the  measurement  by  the  volume  of  a  gas 
evolved. 

NoTK. — Systematic  qualitative  analysis  is  not  required  at  this  stage. 

Natural  Science. 

The  course  appointed  in  Natural  Science  consists  of  three 
sub-courses,  Zoology,  Botany,  and  Geology,  which  are  as 
follows : — 

Zoology — Morphology  of  Earthworm ;  Insect ;  Frog. 
Life  History  of  Butterfly  or  Moth  ;  Frog, 
Thomson's  Outlines  of  Zoology  may  be  consulted. 


sizAfisriiPS.  '         35 

Botany — Stenhouse's  Introduction  to  Nature  Study,  Part  i. 
Geology — Huxley's  Physiography. 

Scripture. 

First  ten  chapters  of  Genesis. 

I  and  11  Samuel. 

Isaiah,  Chapters  xl.  to  end. 

St.  Luke's  Gospel. 

Acts  of  the  Apostles. 

Epistle  to  the  Galatians. 

The  Examiners  are — 

For  Greek  and  Latin  Verse  and  Prose: — The  Kegius  Professor  of 
Greek  and  the  Professor  of  Latin. 

For  English  History  and  Modern  Geography: — The  Professor  of 
Modern  History  and  one  Examiner  appointed  by  the  Board. 

For  English  Literature  and  Composition: — The  Professor  of  English 
Literature  and  one  Examiner  appointed  by  the  Board. 

For  French: — The  Professor  of  the  Romance  Languages  and  one 
Examiner  appointed  by  the  Board. 

For  German : — The  Professor  of  German  and  one  Examiner  appointed 
by  the  Board. 

For  Hebrew  : — The  Professor  of  Hebrew  and  one  Examiner  appointed 
by  the  Board. 

For  Experimental  Science : — The  Professor  of  Natural  and  Experi- 
mental Philosophy  and  the  Professor  of  Chemistry. 

For  Natural  Science  : — The  Professors  of  Botany,  of  Geology  and 
Mineralogy,  and  of  Zoology  and  Comparative  Anatomy. 

For  Modern  Irish : — The  Professor  of  Irish  and  one  Examiner 
appointed  by  the  Board. 

For  Scripture: — Rev.  R.  M.  Gwynn,  b.d. 

4.  SlZARSHtPS. 

SizAUS  are  Students  of  limited  means,  who  have  their  commons 
free  of  expense,  and  are  exempted  from  annual  fees.  Women 
Students  who  obtain  Sizarships  are  allowed  £12  a  year  in  lieu  of 
commons.     The  Entrance  fee  for  Sizars  is  £1  Is.  'id. 

The  poverty  of  the  Candidates  is  one  of  tlie  qualifications  to  be 

inquired  into  before  they  are  admitted  Sizars.     Candidates  for 

Sizarship  are  required  to  send  in  to  the  Senior  Lecturer,  on  or 

before  the  1st  day  of  June  in  each  year,   a   statement  proving 

that  they  are  persons  of  limited  means  and  entitled  to  compete 

for  admission  on  tlie  ground  of  poverty ;  and  only  those  persons 

who  apiiear  to  the  Senior  Lecturer  to  be  qualified  are  permitted 

to  compete.    In  case  of  failure  to  comply  with  this  rule,  the  merits 

of  the  case  are  to  be  considered  by  the  Senior  Lecturer. 

^L        No  candidates  are  admitted  to  the  Sizarship  Examination  who 

B|    (1)  are  already  Matriculated   Students  of  the    University;    or 

B     (2)  are  Graduates  of  any  Chartered  University ;  or  (3)  are  over 

Wi    nineteen  on  the  1st  of  June  of  the  year  in  which  they  compete. 


36  COUllSE  IN  AKTS. 

The  Board  maj%  if  they  thiuk  lit,  award,  independenth*  of  the 
Sizarship  Examination,  not  more  than  one  ISizarsliip  iu  Mathe- 
matics and  one  iu  Classics  to  such,  members  of  the  Junior 
Freshman  Class  as  they  may  consider  to  have  especially  distin- 
guished themselves  since  their  matriculation,  and  to  be  otherwise 
suitable  to  be  awarded  a  Hizarship.  In  this  case  no  limit  of  age 
is  imposed. 

The  Board  offer  Sizarships  in  Experimental  Science,  to  be 
competed  for  by  such  candidates  as  can  produce  definite  evidence 
that  they  have  already  received  Laboratory  instruction. 

Students  who  enter  College  as  Sizars  are  permitted  to  hold  their 
Sizarships  for  four  years.  In  the  event  of  persons  who  are  already 
Students  of  the  College  being  admitted  as  Sizars,  the  duration  of 
their  Sizarships  shall  not  exceed  four  years  from  the  Sizarship 
Examination  next  succeeding  their  entrance  into  College.  Sizars 
who  fail  to  keep  their  class,  or  who  drop  a  class  without  the  ex- 
press permission  of  the  Board,  i/iso  facto,  vacate  their  Sizarshii'S. 

The  Examination  for  Sizarbhips  is  held  annually  at  the  end  of 
Trinity  Term,  and  is  marked  in  the  Almanac  for  the  year.  The 
Examination  commences  at  9.30. 

Sizarshij)s  in  Mathematics,  Classics,  Ex2)erimental  Science, 
Natural  Science,  Moderii  Lanyuayes,  Hebrew,  and  Irish. — The 
Sizarship  Examination  lasts  for  two  days,  and  400  marks  are 
assigned  at  it.  The  first  day,  and  the  morning  of  the  second  daj-, 
are  devoted  to  the  special  subject.  Mathematics,  Classics,  Experi- 
mental Science,  Natural  Science,  Modern  Languages,  Hebrew, or 
Irish,  and  300  marks  assigned  to  it.  The  last  afternoon  is  devoted 
(1)  to  an  English  Essay  (counting  50  marks),  for  which  all  can- 
didates, whether  in  Mathematics,  Classics,  Experimental  Science, 
Natural  Science,  Modern  Languages,  Hebrew,  or  Irish,  must 
compete ;  (2)  for  the  candidates  in  Mathematics,  Experimental 
Science,  and  Natural  Science,  to  an  easy  paper  in  Latin  Composi- 
tion and  a  viva  voce  Examination  in  a  Latin  and  a  Greek  author  of 
his  own  selection,  it  being  permissible  for  candidates  to  substitute 
French  or  German  for  Greek  ;  and  (3)  for  the  candidates  in 
Classics,  Modern  Languages,  Hebrew,  and  Irish,  to  a  paper  in 
Arithmetic  and  Algebra,  and  a  viva  voce  Examination  in  Geometry 
(as  in  the  Entrance  Course) ;  and  this  portion  of  the  Examination 
will,  in  each  case,  count  50  marks.  Candidates  in  Modern 
Languages  must  also  pass  a  qualifying  Examination  in  Latin, 
candidates  in  Irish  a  qualifying  Examination  in  Latin,  and 
candidates  in  Natural  Science  a  qualifying  Examination  in 
Mathematics,  as  arranged  for  the  Entrance  Course. 


Classics. 

First  Morning. — Translation  from  Greek  authors  (unprescribed 
70  marks. 

First  Evening. — Translation  from  Latin  authors  (unprescribed) 
70  marks. 


^ 


SlZA.KSttll'S.  37 

Buriug  the  first  day  the  candidates  are  examined  viva  voce 
in  one  Greelc  and  one  Latin  author,  as  prescribed  below.  The 
mark  assigned  to  this  viva  voce  Examination  is  40.  The 
prescribed  authors  are — 

Any  three  books  of  Homer,  or  any  one  book  of  Tliucydides. 
Any  one  book  of  Livy,  or  any  one  of  the  following  portions  of 
Horace : — (a)  Odes,   (6)  Satires,  (c)  Epistles,  including  the 
Ars  Poetica. 

[Candidates  must  send  to  the  Senior  Lecturer,  at  least  a  month 
before   the    Examination,    notice  of   the    portions   of  these 
authors  in  which  they  intend  to  present  themselves.] 
Second  Morning. — Greek  Prose  Composition,  40  marks. 
Latin  Prose  Composition,  40  marks. 
Ancient   History    [viva  voce  in   a   class), 
40  marks. 
[Candidates   are    expected  to    know   tlie    principal    facts    in 
Greek  History,  and  the  Outlines  of  Greek  Literature  and  Art, 
from  the  earliest  times  to  323  B.C.  ;    and  the  principal  facts 
in  lloman  History,  and  the  Outlines  of  Roman  Literature, 
from  the  earliest  times  to  37  a.d.] 
A   paper  in  Greek  and  Latin  Verse  Composition  is   set  as  a 
voluntary  exercise  on  the  third  morning.   It  counts  40  marks ; 
but  no  credit  is  given  unless  positive  merit  is  shown. 

Mathetnatict. 

Geometry. — Deductions  from  Euclid. 

Geometrical  treatment  of  the  general  focal  properties  of  conies  with 
particular  appliciition  to  the  ellipse  and  parabola. 

The  Methods  of  Coordinates,  Graphs,  Analytical  Geometry  of  the 
Right  Line,  and  of  the  circle  in  rectangular  Cartesian  coordinates. 

Algebra. — Arithmetical  and  Geometrical  Progression  —  Scales  of 
Notation— Surds  and  Imaginary  Quantities — Quadratic  Equations  and 
Simultaneous  Equations  of  the  second  Degree — Permutations  and 
Combinations  —  Binomial  Theorem — Logarithms  —  Exponential  and 
Logarithmic  Series — Partial  Fractions — Continued  Fractions — Algebraic 
Series. 

N.B. — Hall  and  Kniglit's  Higher  Algebra,  chaps,  i.-xvii.  (inclusive), 
xxiii.,  xxiv.,  xxv.,  xxix.,  is  recommended. 

Theory  of  Equations. — Relation  between  the  Roots  and  Coefficients  of 
Equations — Elementary  Symmetric  Functions  of  the  Roots — Transfor- 
mation of  Equations — Horner's  Method  of  Solving  Numerical  Equations. 

Trigonometry. — To  the  end  of  the  Solution  of  Plane  Triangles — De 
Moivre's  Theorem — Exponential  Forms  o|  Trigonometric  Functions — 
Trigonometric  Series. 

Eleinentary  Mechanics. — Laws  of  motion  ;  composition  and  lesolution 
of  velocities,  accelerations,  and  forces  ;  equilibrium  under  coplanar 
forces ;  polygon  of  forces ;  simple  applications  of  graphic  methods  ; 
simple  machines  ;  M'ork  and  energy. 


38  COtJttSE  IN  Aets. 

Ex2}erimental  Science, 

Elementary  Mathematics. — A  Paper  will  Le  set  in  Elementary  Mathe- 
matics. Such  a  knowledge  of  Mathematics  will  be  expected  as  is 
required  for  a  proper  study  of  the  Course  in  Experimental  Science. 
Simple  questions  may  be  set  in  Mechanioe,  Hydrostatics,  and  Geo- 
metrical Optics.  Candidates  will  be  expected  to  be  familiar  with  the 
use  of  squared  paper,  and  to  know  how  to  plot  their  results  on  it. 

Experimental  Physics. — Measurement  of  length,  area,  volume,  mass, 
and  weight ;  density,  time,  velocity,  acceleration,  and  pressure — 
Simpler  phenomena  of  Heat,  Light,  and  Sound. 

There  will  he  a  Practical  Examination  as  well  as  a  Written 
Examination. 

Chemistry. — General  properties  of  substances — Mixtures  and  solu- 
tions— Processes  employed  in  the  Laboratory,  such  as  evaporation, 
distillation,  solution,  crystallization,  filtration — Effect  of  heat  on  solu- 
bility of  solids  and  gases  in  water — Oxidation  of  elementary  substances 
by  heating  in  air  or  oxygen,  and  by  other  methods — Properties  of  oxygen 
and  nitrogen  and  of  the  oxides  of  nitrogen — Atmospheric  air,  its  com- 
position and  properties — Preparation  and  pioperties  of  the  commoner 
acids  and  alkalies — Calcium  carbonate,  carbon  dioxide,  lime — Action  of 
acids  on  metals — Hydrogen — Water — Chemical  elements  and  com- 
pounds— Distinction  between  metals  and  non-metals,  and  between 
chemical  compounds  and  mechanical  mixtures — Volume  of  gas  evolved 
by  action  of  various  acids  on  metals — Effect  of  temperature  and  pressure 
on  the  volume  of  a  gas — Density  of  a  gas — Calcvilation  of  the  weight 
of  a  gas  from  its  volume  and  density — Indestructibility  of  matter — 
Law  of  definite  proportions — Law  of  equivalent  M'eights. 

There  will  be  a  Practical  as  well  as  a  Written  Examination. 

Modern  Languages. 

One  Sizarship  is  ofiered  each  year  in  Modern  Languages,  French 
and  German. 

The  Examination  will  consist  of  passages  (unprescribed)  foi 

translation    from   French    and    German,    and    of    passages    for 

Composition  in  both   languages.     The  candidates   will   also   be 

examined  viva  voce  in  the  following  authors: — 

i  C.  Delavigne :  Louis  XL  (ed.  Eve). 

French,  .     .JMichelet:  Louis  XL  et  Charles  le  Temeraire  (ed 

(      Ropes). 
German,  .     .     Freytag  :  Der  Staat  Friedrichs  des  Grossen  (Cam- 
bridge) . 

iSizarships  in  Hebrew. 

To  encourage  the  study  of  Hebrew,  one  Sizarship  is  usually 
given  annually.  The  special  Course  will  consist  of  the  Latin 
Prose  Composition  and  the  viva  voce  portion  of  the  Examination 
for  Classical  Sizarships,  together  with  the  following  Course  of 
Hebrew : — 

Hebrew  Grammar. 

Exodus,  Chaps,  i.-xi.  (inclusive). 

Psalms,  i.-xxiv.  (inclusive). 


SIZAESHIP8.  39 

In  determining  the  election  to  the  Hebrew  Sizarship,  equal  weight 
is  allowed  to  the  answering  in  Classics  and  in  Hebrew. 

No  Student  is  elected  to  a  Sizarship  for  answering  in  Hebrew 
unless  the  Examiners  report  him  to  the  Senior  Lecturer  as  having 
positive  merit  of  a  high  order. 

Sizarshij)8  in  Irish. 

For  the  encouragement  of  the  study  of  Irish,  one  Sizarship  is 
usually  given  annually.    The  special  Course  will  be  as  follows  : — 

{a)  A  thorough  knowledge  of  Irish  Grammar  is  required. 
{b)  Passages  are  set  for  Translation  at  sight  from  Irish  into  English, 
and  from  English  into  Irish. 

{c)    Candidates  are  examined  vivA  voce  in  these  books  : — 
Finn-sgeulta  na  h-Araibe. 
Poems  of  Bonnchadh  liuadh  Mac  Conmara  (ed.  Flaunery). 

Sizarships  in  Natural  Science. 

Geology. — The  principles  of  Physiography  and  Physical  Geology. 

The  Student  is  advised  to  consult  Huxley's  Physiograpliy 
and  those  parts  which  relate  to  Physical  Geology  in  either 
Lapwoith's  Intermediiite  Textbook  of  Geology,  or  Geikie's 
Cliissbook  of  Geology. 

Zoology. — Life-history  and  external  anatomy  of  a  Moth,  a  Beetle,  and 

a  Frog  or  Toad. 
Habits  and  life-history  of  Pond  Animals. 
Special  questions  will  be  set  on  the  life-history  and  habits 

of  any  gioup  or  class  offered. 

Candidates  should  consult  "  The  Pond  I  Know,"  edited 
by  Westell  and  Turner,  J.  K.  Dent,  London. 

Botany. — Life-history  and  anatomy  of  the  Broad  Bean. 

The  germination  of  Cress,  Wheat,  and  Sunflower. 
The  life-history  of  a  Fern  and  of  a  Moss. 
Characteristics    of    the     following    Natural     Oi'ders    of 

Flowering  Plants : — llaniiticulaceoe,  Rosacese,  Labiatae, 

and  Liliaceae. 

Special  weight  will  be  given  in  the  Examination  to 
facility  shown  by  candidates  in  recording  observations  by 
sketches. 

Candidates  may  consult  Plant  Biology  by  F.  Cavers, 
University  Tutorial  Press. 

The  Board  may  elect  to  Sizarships  in  each  year  all  candidates 
who  display  marked  merit  at  the  Sizarsliip  Examination,  irrespec- 
tive of  the  number  of  vacancies  created  by  the  expiration  of 
Sizarships  previously  awarded. 

Reid  Sizarships. — In  the  scheme  approved  by  the  Master  of  the 
Rolls,  filed  7th  August,  1888,  it  was  directed  that  the  income  of 


40  COURSE  IN  ARTS. 

the  Reid  Sizarship  bequest  should  be  applied  to  found  additional 
Sizarships  or  Exhibitions  in  the  nature  of  Sizarships,  "not  to 
exceed  five  in  number,  open  only  to  Students  of  limited  means, 
natives  of  the  County  of  Kerry,  who,  having  failed  to  obtain  ordi- 
nary Sizarships,  may  be  deemed  to  have  shown  sufficient  merit. 
Such  Exhibitions  to  be  held  on  conditions  similar  in  all  respects  to 
those  upon  which  ordinary  Sizarships  are  held  in  the  said  College, 
and  not  to  preclude  such  Exhibitioners  from  obtaining  any  other 
Exhibitions  or  Prizes,  for  which  an  ordinary  Sizar  would  be 
eligible,  and  the  said  College  shall  determine  the  annual  stipend 
to  be  allowed  to  each  such  Exhibitioner,  or  the  privileges  in  lieu 
of  such  stipend,  in  such  way,  as  to  place  him,  with  respect  to 
exemption  from  fees,  free  commons  and  free  rooms,  on  a  footing 
similar  to  that  of  ordinary  Sizars."* 

UNDERGRADUATE  COURSE. 
5.  Explamilion  of  Terviinoloyy. 

There  are  three  Terms  in  each  Calendar  year,  i.e.,  Hilarj' 
Term,  beginning  on  January  10,  and  ending  on  March  25  ;  Trinitj- 
Term,  beginning  on  April  15,  and  ending  on  June  30;  and 
Michaelmas  Term,  beginning  on  October  10,  and  ending  on 
December  20.  If,  however,  I'iaster  happens  to  fall  within  the 
limits  of  Hilary  or  of  Trinity  Term,  that  Term  is  increased  by  an 
additional  week. 

The  Academic  Year  commences  in  tlie  beginning  of  November, 
I.e.,  with  the  Lectures  of  the  Michaelmas  Term.  Afterwards, 
in  the  beginning  of  Hilary  Term,  there  are  the  Hilary  Term 
Examinations  in  the  subjects  of  the  Michaelmas  Lectures.  Tlien 
follow  the  Lectures  of  Hilary  Term,  and  the  Trinity  Term  Exami- 
nations, and  finally  the  Lectures  of  Trinity  Term  and  the  Exami- 
nations of  Michaelmas  Term,  which  close  the  Academic  Year, 
which  therefore  extends  from  November  to  November. 

Freshmen  and  Sophisiers. — During  the  first  Academic  Year, 
Students  are  called  Junior  Freshmen  ;  during  the  second  Academic 
Year,  Senior  Freshmen ;  during  the  third  and  fourth  years.  Junior 
and  Senior  Sophisters ;  then  Junior,  Middle,  and  Senior  l5aehelors  ; 
but  a  Student  belonging  to  the  Junior  iJachelor  Class  is  called  a 
Candidate  Bachelor,  not  a  Junior  Bachelor,  until  he  has  actually 
taken  the  B.A.  Degree.  Graduates  wha  are  of  standing  entitling 
them  to  take  out  the  Degree  of  Master  in  Arts  are  called  Candidate 

'  It  was  also  airanged  that  the  residue  (if  any)  of  the  income  of  the  Reid  Sizai-ship 
endowment  might  be  appUed  in  paying  the  usual  fees  to  the  Examiners  at  the  Exami- 
nations for  such  Sizarsiiips,  and  in  such  manner  as  the  Board  of  Trinity  College  might 
think  best  calculated  to  encourage  superior  education  in  the  said  County,  as,  for  instance, 
by  assigning  from  time  to  time  stipends  to  such  Schoolmasters  as  may  distinguish  them- 
selves in  preparing  Students  for  Trinity  College,  Dublin,  such  stipends  to  be  given  on 
condition  that  such  Master  or  Masters  shall  undertake  to  prepare,  free  of  expense,  as 
Day-Scholars,  a  certain  number  of  bays  ot  limited  means  for  the  Sizai'ship  Examination 
of  the  College,  or  in  such  other  way  as  to  the  said  College  may  seem  most  effectual  and 
expedient  for  the  promotion  of  superior  education  in  the  said  County. 


GENEEAL   EFLES. 


41 


Masters.     They  are  of  tliis  stuudiug  three  years  after  they  have 
juissed  the  Kxamiuatioii  for  the  Degree  of  b,A. 

Hv  a  risintj  Juiiiur  Freshman  is  meant  a  Student  who,  having 
matriculated,  has  not  yet  entered  on  his  actual  Junior  Freshman 
year,  which  begins  in  November. 

At  the  commencement  of  each  Term  there  is  a  general  Pass 
Examination  for  each  of  the  four  academic  classes,  except  that 
the  Degree  Examination  is  held  in  December  at  the  end  of  the 
fourth  year,  when  a  student  has  become  a  Candidate  Bachelor, 
and  Supplemental  Examinations  are  held  in  the  following 
January  and  April. 

At  the  beginning  of  each  Term  there  are  also  Honor  Examina- 
tions in  the  various  Honor  Scliools. 

In  each  Term  the  undergraduate  Lectures  in  Arts,  both  those 
of  the  Pass  course  and  those  of  the  Honor  Schools,  commence  after 
the  general  Pass  examinations  of  the  several  classes  are  over. 

A  Student  is  said  to  have  credit  for  a  Term  by  Lectures  or  to 
have  kept  a  Term  by  Lectures  when  he  has  attended  with 
diligence  the  Lectures  ])rescribed  for  that  Term.  He  is  said  to 
have  kept  a  term  by  Examination  when  lie  has  passed  an 
Exaraination  in  the  subjects  of  the  Lectures  prescribed  for  that 
Term.  Thus,  for  example,  a  Student  keeps  Michaelmas  Term  by 
Lectures  when  he  attends  the  Lectures  given  daily  during 
Michaelmas  Term  ;  and  he  keeps  Michaelmas  Term  by  Examina- 
tion when  he  passes  the  Examination  in  the  same  Courses  held 
at  the  beginning  of  the  succeeding  Hilary  Term.  Two  Terms 
are  said  to  be  distinct  when  they  are  not  kept  by  Lectures  and 
by  Examination  in  the  same  courses  ;  for  example,  when  a  Junior 
Freshman  attends  Lectures  in  Michaelmas  Term,  and  passes  the 
Hilary  Examination  in  January  or  the  (Supplemental  Hilary 
Examination  in  June,  he  does  not  thereby  get  credit  for  two 
distinct  Terms. 

6.  Course  of  Study. 

In  order  to  obtain  the  Degree  of  R.A.,  or  Bachelor  in  Arts,  a 
Student,  unless  exempted,  is  required  to  keep  every  Term  by 
Lectures,  and  is  not  required  to  keep  every  Term  by  examination, 
but  must  keep  one  Term  by  Examination. in  the  Junior  Freshman 
year,  pass  the  Final  Freshman  Exaraination,  keep  one  Term  by 
Examination  in  the  Junior  Sophister  Year,  and  pass  the  Degree 
Examination.  In  the  normal  course  a  Student  keeps  a  Term  by 
Lectures  when  he  attends  with  diligence  the  prescribed  Pass 
Lectures;  but  he  may  substitute  Honor  Lectures  for  the  J 'ass 
Lectures  in  the  same  subject,  and  if  pro])erly  qualified  (see  §  16) 
may  keep  his  Term  by  attending  one  Course  alone  of  Honor 
Lectures.  Also  under  the  Regulations  laid  down  in  §  16,  Honor 
Students  properly  qualified  may  obtain  credit  for  a  Term  by 

/ 


42  COURSE  IN  ARTS. 

Examination  if  tliey  obtain  a  First  Honor  at  a  Term  Prize,  or 
Honar  Examination.  Professional  Students  also  are  allowed  to 
substitute  in  the  Sophister  years  the  lectures  of  their  Schools  for 
one  of  the  courses  of  Lectures  required  from  other  Students,  Also 
the  Lecture  Committee  is  empowered  to  allow  a  Student  to  sub- 
stitute other  Lectures  for  the  Pass  Lectures,  if  application  is 
made  to  them  through  the  Tutor  of  the  Student,  and  if  they 
deem  the  reason  adequate,  and  consider  the  substitution  desirable 
in  the  interests  of  the  Student. 

7.  Exem^Hions  from  Attendance  on  Lectures. 

In  dealing  with  exemptions  from  the  regulation  that  Students 
must  keep  every  Lecture  Term,  it  is  laid  down  as  a  fundamental 
rule  that  to  obtain  the  B.A.  Degree  all  Students  except  Medical 
Students  must  obtain  credit  for  the  following  minimum  of 
eight  Terms,  viz.  : — They  must  keep  one  Term  by  Ex;imination 
in  the  Junior  Freshman  year,  pass  the  Final  Freshman 
Examination,  keep  one  Term  by  Examination  in  the  Junior 
Sophister  year,  pass  the  Degree  Examination,  obtain  credit  for 
two  other  distinct  Terms  either  by  Lectures  or  by  Examination 
in  the  Freshman  years,  one  of  which  must  be  in  the  Senior 
Freshman  year,  and  obtain  credit  for  two  other  distinct  Terms 
either  by  Lectures  or  by  Examination  in  the  Sophister  years, 
one  of  which  must  be  in  the  Senior  Sophister  year. 

For  privileges  granted  to  Honor  Students  see  §  16. 

A  special  Course  in  Arts  has  been  arranged  for  Medical  Students. 

Students  while  attending  in  full  the  Lectures  of  the  Professional 
School 
or 

by  . 

that  they  keep  the  above  minimum  of  eight  Terms.  In.  every 
Term,  however,  in  which  they  do  not  intend  to  keep  the  Term  by 
Lectures,  they  must  give  information  to  the  Senior  Lecturer,  so 
that  an  entry  of  their  professional  qualification  may  be  inserted 
in  the  Term  Book. 

In  the  case  of  other  students  who,  owing  to  their  circumstances, 
seek  exemption  from  keeping  a  particular  term  by  Lectures,  it  is 
provided  that,  on  sufficient  reason  being  sliown,  the  Lecture 
Committee  may  either  allow  a  student  to  keep  the  Term  by 
Examination  instead  of  by  Lectures,  or,  if  they  think  fit,  grant 
him  complete  exemption  from  attendance  on  Lectures  during  the 
Term.  Such  students  must  submit  their  reasons  to  their  Tutors, 
who  must  lay  them  in  writing  before  the  Lecture  Committee, 
at  least  one  week  before  Lectures  bey;in,  and  if  in  their  opinion 
the  reasons  are  sufficient,  an  entry  to  that  effect  will  be  made  in 
the  Terra  Book. 

Before  entrance  a  Student  may  apply  for  permission  to  keep 


GENEBAL   RULES.  43 

Terms  by  Examiuatiou  alone  to  the  Lecture  Committee  through 
the  Senior  Lecturer  or  tlie  Tutor  under  whom  he  intends  to  enter  ; 
but  if  permission  be  granted,  after  Entrance  it  will  be  necessary 
for  him  formally  to  renew  the  application  each  Term  through 
his  Tutor,  in  order  to  show  the  continued  existence  of  the  reasons 
which  justified  the  permission  originally. 

A  student  against  whose  name  there  is  not  a  satisfactory  entry 
covering  each  Lecture  Terra  of  the  Academic  year,  does  not  rise 
with  his  class. 

It  is  not  intended  to  deprive  non-resident  students  of  the 
possibility  of  obtaining  the  H.A.  Degree  by  examination  alone,  but 
this  concession  will  be  granted  only  to  students  who  satisfy  as 
above  the  Lecture  Committee  tliat  their  reasons  for  non-attend- 
ance at  Lectures  are  sufficient,  and  such  students  will  have  to 
keep  the  minimum  number  of  eight  Terras  by  examination  (making 
with  the  Entrance  nine  examinations  in  all). 

8-  A  Junior  Freshman  or  a  Junior  Sojjhister  who  fails  to  obtain 
credit  for  the  compulsory  examination  of  his  year  loses  his  class, 
but  in  other  cases  where  a  student  fails  to  keep  the  exercises 
necessary  to  rise  in  November  to  the  next  higher  class,  he  may, 
"with  the  permission  of  the  Lectxire  Committee,  retain  his  class  by 
keeping  certain  supplemental  Terms.  In  all  such  cases  applica- 
tion must  be  made  through  the  Senior  Lecturer. 

When  a  Student  loses  his  class,  he  retains  credit  for  all  the 
Terms  he  has  already  kept,  but  unless  exempted  must  conform  to 
the  rule  of  keeping  every  Term  by  Lectures  so  long  as  his  name 
remains  on  the  College  Books. 

A  student  who  desires  to  avail  himself,  to  the  full  extent,  of 
the  benefit  of  a  University  Education,  should,  in  addition  to  the 
Ordinary  Course,  take  the  Lectures  and  Examinations  in  some 
one  or  more  of  the  various  Honor  and  Prize  Courses.  He  is 
also  permitted  to  attend  such  of  the  Professional  Lectures  as  deal 
with  subjects  of  interest  to  him. 

9.  Abriihjment  of  Course  of  Study  or  Saving  a    Year. 

The  regular  period  of  Study  extends  over  four  years,  but  there 
are  provisions  by  which  a  Student  can  obtain  his  Degree  in  less 
than  four  calendar  years ;  for  instance,  under  certain  circum- 
stances, a  Student  entering  in  October  may  obtain  his  Degree  in 
about  two  years  and  eight  months. 

A  Student  who  enters  before  the  21st  of  March  in  any  year  is 
placed,  in  the  Junior  Freshman  Class  wliich  commenced  in  the 
previous  November,  and  a  Student  who  enters  on  or  after  the 
21st  of  March  is  in  the  ordinary  course  i)laced  in  the  class  which 
commences  iy  the  succeeding  November.  But  a  Student  entering 
on  or  after  the  2 1st  of  March  and  before  the  Junior  Freshman 


44  COUllSE  IN  ARTS. 

Examiuatiou  iu  October  is  permitted  to  join  the  existing  Junior 
Freshman  Class  (i.e.  tliat  formed  in  tlie  jirevious  November)  on 
payment  of  the  haif-j-early  fee  of  ten  guineas  ])aid  in  April 
hy  members  of  that  class  ;  and  if  he  passes  the  Trinity  Term 
Examination,  or  the  Hilary  Supplemental  Examination,  or  the 
Michaelmas  Examination,  and  has,  unless  exempted,  kept  Trinity 
Term  by  Lectures,  should  he  have  entered  before  they  commence, 
he  will  begin  the  Senior  Freshman  year  in  the  November  succeed- 
ing his  Entrance.  Such  a  Student  is  said  to  have  saved  his  year, 
and  it  will  be  necessary  for  him,  as  for  any  other  member  of  the 
Class,  to  pay  a  second  half-yearly  Fee  on  or  before  the  Friday 
before  the  hrst  Saturday  in  November.  Thus  the  total  amount 
of  tlie  Fees  payable  during  the  Course  is  the  same  whether  the 
year  be  saved  or  not. 

in  the  Senior  Sophister  3  ear  a  somewliat  similar  advantage  is 
sometimes  granted.  A  Student  who  obtains  the  necessary  per- 
mission from  the  Senior  Lecturer  (see  §  13)  is  allowed  to  rise 
from  the  Senior  Sophister  Class  to  the  Candidate  Bachelor  Class 
_iu  the  June  instead  of  the  November  of  his  Senior  Sophister  year 
on  payment  of  the  Fees  necessary  to  entitle  him  to  be  placed  iu 
that  Class,  and  is  then  permitted  to  answer  for  his  Degree  in  June. 
The  names  of  such  Students  are  kept  on  the  books  until  the 
following  June  without  further  payment,  and  tlie  total  amount  of 
the  Fees  payable  is  not  increased.  Such  permission  willbe  always 
granted  to  Students  who  have  kept  all  the  Tei-ms  sinceEntrance 
by  Lectures. 

10.  The  following  rules  repeat  in  detail  the  Academic  exercises 
required  from  Students  in  each  of  the  Undergraduate  years: — 

Junior  Freshman  Year. 

In  the  Junior  Freshman  year,  a  Student  must  obtain  credit  for  one 
Term  bp  Examination,  otherwise  he  will  not  be  allowed  to  become  a 
Senior  Freshman  in  November,  but  will  be  put  down  to  the  Class  then 
commencing  the  Junior  Freshman  j^ear. 

Unless  exempted,  he  must  also  liave  kept  every  Term  after  his 
Entrance  by  Lectures. 

For  the  regulations  with  regard  to  the  keeping  of  Catechetical  Terms, 
which  is  optional,  see  Catechetical  Course. 

In  June  there  is  a  Supplemental  Examination  in  the  subjects  of 
the  Hilary  Examination,  but  only  Students  who  have  not  already 
credit  for  a  Term  Examination  are  permitted  to  present  themselves 
at  this  Examination.  (Students  who  are  exempted  should  observe 
that  attendance  on  the  ]\lichaelmas  Term  Lectures  and  passing 
the  Supplemental  Hilary  Examination  in  June  do  not  entitle  them 
to  credit  for  two  distinct  Terms.) 

11.  Senior  Freshman  Year. 

To  rise  with  his  class  [i.e.  to  become  a  Junior  Sophister  in  the 
November   which    ends   his    Senior   Freshman    year),    a    Senior 


FRESHMAN     YEAKS.  45 

Freshman  must,  in  addition  to  the  compulsorj'^  Junior  P'reshman 
Examination,  have  kept  two  other  distinct  Terms  either  by 
Lectures  or  by  Examination  before  tlie  Lectures  in  the  Trinity 
Term  of  his  Senior  Fresliraan  year,  and  one  of  these  Terms  must 
be  in  the  Senior  Freshman  year.  He  must  also  pass  the  Final 
Freshman  Examination,  or  Little-Go,  held  at  the  be;^inning  of 
Michaelmas  Term,  or  one  of  the  Supplemental  Examinations  held 
at  the  beginning  of  Hilary  and  Trinity  Terms,  and  unless 
exempted  must  iiave  kept  the  three  Terms  of  his  Senior  Freshman 
year  by  Lectures. 

In  ease  of  failure  to  keep  the  required  Exercises,  see  §  8. 

For  the  regulations  with  regard  to  the  keeping  of  Catechetical  Terms, 
•which  is  optional,  see  Catechetical  Course. 

A  Student  who  fails  to  pass  the  Final  Freshman  Examination 
in  his  Senior  Freshman  year  may  supplement  it  in  the  following 
January  or  April,  and  until  he  has  passed  shall  attend  such 
Lectures  as  the  Senior  Lecturer  may  consider  advisable.  If  he 
passes,  he  proceeds  with  liis  Junior  Sophister  year;  but  if  lie 
fails,  he  is  degraded  to  the  Senior  Freshman  Class,  and  attends 
such  Lectures  as  the  Senior  Lecturer  may  prescribe. 

No  Senior  Freshman  Student  can  be  awarded  a  Prize  at  the 
Michaelmas  Examinations  of  his  Class  unless  he  has  passed  the 
Final  Freshman  Examination. 

12.  Junior  Sophister  Year. 

In  the  Junior  Sophister  year,  a  Student  must  obtain  credit  for  one 
Term  by  Examination ;  otherwise  he  will  not  be  allowed  to  become  a 
Senior  Sophister  in  November,  but  will  be  put  down  to  the  Class  then 
commencing  the  Junior  Sophister  year.  Unless  exempted  he  must 
also  have  kept  the  three  Terms  of  the  Junior  Sojjhister  year  by  Lectures. 

Senior  Sophister  Year,  and  Degree  Examination. 

13.  In  addition  to  the  compulsory  Examination  of  the  Junior 
Sophister  year,  a  Senior  Sophister  must  keep  two  other  distinct 
terms  before  the  Trinity  Lectures  of  his  Senior  Sophister  year, 
and  one  of  these  Terms  must  be  in  the  Senior  Sophister  year. 
Also  unless  exempted  he  must  have  kept  the  three  Terms  of  his 
Senior  Sophister  year  by  Lectures. 

Senior  Sophisters  who  have  satisfied  these  requirements  are 
raised  in  November  to  the  Candidate  Bachelor  Class,  and  may 
compete  for  the  Degree  Examination  in  the  following  December 
or  January  or  April. 

By  the  special  permission  of  the  Senior  Lecturer,  they  may  also  be 
raised  in  June  to  the  standing  of  Candidate  Bachelors  on  payment  of 
the  half-yearly  fee  due  before  a  Student  becomes  a  Candidate  Bachelor, 
and  they  would  then  be  entitled  to  present  themselves  at  the  Degree 
E.xamination  in  June.  The  names  of  such  Students  remain  on  the 
College  Books  till  the  first  Saturday  in  the  succeeding  June.     Such 


46  COUESR  IN  Aiiis. 

permission,  however,  is  not  extended  to  Students  who  have  to  keep  an 
Examination  in  Trinity  Term  in  order  to  qualify  for  admission  to  the 
Examination  for  Degree. 

In  granting  this  permission  regard  is  had  to  the  merit  which  the 
Student  has  shown  at  the  Final  Freshman  and  other  Examinations,  as 
well  as  the  importance  to  the  Student  of  obtaining  the  Degree  at  the 
earlier  date.  As  stated  before,  such  permission  will  always  be  granted 
to  Students  who  have  kept  all  the  Lecture  Terms  since  Entrance. 
Students  seeking  this  privilege  must  make  a'pplication  to  the  Senior 
Lecturer  on  or  before  June  L 

In  cases  of  extreme  urgency  the  Board  sometimes  allow  Senior 
Sophisters  to  be  raised  to  the  Candidate  Bachelor  Class  and  answer 
for  their  Degree  in  April. 

A  Senior  Sophister  who  has  not  satisfied  the  above  requirements 
may  bj'  permission  of  the  Senior  Lecturer  be  raised  provisionally 
to  the  Candidate  Bachelor  Class,  on  condition  of  his  perfoi'ming 
such  supplemental  exercises  as  the  Senior  Lecturer  may  prescribe, 
and  he  may  (provided  his  name  is  on  the  College  Books)  proceed 
to  the  Degree  Examination  in  any  Terra  subsequent  to  that  in 
which  he  has  completed  the  exercises. 

No  Student  is  entitled  to  present  himself  as  a  candidate  at  the 
Moderatorship  or  December  Degree  Examinations  of  his  class 
unless  he  has  by  the  end  of  Trinity  Term  kept  all  the  Terras 
required  before  the  Degree  Examination ;  but  in  exceptional 
cases  he  may  be  allowed  to  do  so  by  special  permission  of  the 
Board,  provided  that  he  has  performed  such  supplemental  exercises 
as  may  be  necessary  to  entitle  him  to  sit  for  the  Degree  Exami- 
nation. 

Mode  of  obtaining  Credit  for  the  various  Terms. 

As  stated  in  §  5,  Terms  may  be  kept  by  Examination  or  by 
Lectures. 

14.  Keeping  of  Arts  Terms  by  Examination. 

Students  are  not  allowed  to  present  themselves  at  Ordinary 
Examinations  without  notice  to  be  given  to  the  Senior  Lecturer 
not  later  than  fourteen  days  before  the  first  day  of  the  examina- 
tion, provided  that  tardy  notice  may  be  accepted  up  to  eight  days 
before  the  examination  on  payment  of  a  fine  of  2s.  Qd.  to 
accompany  the  notice  for  every  day  in  arrear.  JS'o  notice  shall  be 
accepted  in  any  circumstances  unless  it  has  been  given  eight 
days  before  the  examination 

Notice  must  be  given  on  the  form  provided  for  the  purpose. 

A  Student  presenting  himself  for  Examination  is  required  by 
the  Senior  Lecturer  to  answer  satisfactorily  in  each  separate  sub- 
ject, or  group  of  allied  subjects,  for  which  he  is  liable.  A  slight 
deficiency  in  one  subject  may,  however,  be  counterbalanced  by 
marked  proficiency  in  others,  provided  the  previous  record  of  the 


KEEPING  OF  ABT8  TERMS.  47 

Student  does  not  indicate  persistent  neglect  of  the  deficient  subject. 
Special  attention  is  paid  to  the  mark  in  English  Composition. 

The  name  of  a  Student  presenting  himself  at  an  Examination 
must  be  on  the  College  books  hefoi-e  the  day  of  that  Examination. 

The  October  Final  Freshman  Examination  and  all  Degree 
Examinations  last  three  days;  all  the  other  Term  Examinations 
last  for  two  days.  On  the  first  day  papers  are  set ;  on  the  second 
day  the  candidates  are  examined  viva  voce,  and  further  papers 
may  also  be  set.  Term  Examinations  commence  in  the  forenoon 
at  half-past  nine,  and  in  the  afternoon  at  two  o'clock ;  on  the 
viva  voce  days  a  Student  must  remain  in  the  Examination  Hall 
until  all  his  viva  voce  Examinations  are  completed. 

Students  must  wear  academicals  at  all  Arts  Examinations  other 
than  Entrance  and  Sizarship. 

Students  residing  habitually  at  a  distance  from  Dublin,  and 
coming  to  Dublin  to  attend  the  Examinations  of  their  Class,  may 
put  their  names  on  Commons  on  the  days  on  which  these  Exami- 
nations are  held.  They  should  communicate  with  the.  Clerk  of 
the  Buttery  at  or  shortly  after  12  o'clock  on  the  day  of  the 
Examination. 

A  programme,  giving  the  hours  at  which  the  different  papers 
are  set,  is  posted  on  the  notice  board  at  the  Front  Gate,  a  day  or 
two  before  the  Examination. 

A  Student  who  obtains  a  Moderatorship  is  not  required  to 
compete  at  the  ordinary  Degree  Examination. 


15.  Keepinff  of  Arts  Terms  by  Lectures. 

Students  in  order  to  obtain  credit  for  a  Term  by  attendance 
at  Tutorial  Lectures  are  required  to  attend  five-sixths  of  the 
number  of  Lectures  appointed  for  the  Term ;  but  the  Senior  Lec- 
turer may  on  the  recommendation  of  their  Lecturer,  and  without 
reference  to  the  Board,  grant  terms  to  Students  who  shall  have 
attended  not  less  than  three-fourths  of  the  whole. 

When  attendance  on  two  different  branches  of  one  subject  is 
required  {e.y.,  French  and  Latin),  the  Student  must  attend  at 
least  five-sixths  of  the  total  number  of  Lectures,  and  must  attend 
at  least  three-fourths  of  the  number  given  by  each  Lecturer 
severally. 

Students  seeking  credit  for  a  Term  by  Lectures  must,  at  the 
commencement  of  such  Term,  register  with  the  Clerk  of  the  Books 
their  places  of  residence  for  that  Term,  and  during  Term  notify 
any  change  of  residence.  If  this  rule  be  not  observed,  credit  for 
the  Term  cannot  be  allowed. 

Students  keeping  the  Term  by  Lectures  can  ascertain  the  hours 
at  which  they  are  to  attend,  as  well  as  the  names  of  their  Lecturers, 
from  the  notices  posted  at  their  Tutors'  Rooms. 

Students  may  obtain  credit  for  their  Terms  in  Modern  Languages, 


48  COURSE  IN  ARTS. 

by  attending  any  official  Term  of  Lectures  in  the  subject,  irrespec- 
tive of  Class, 

Terms  may  also  be  kept  by  attendance  on  Lectures  in  the  Indian 
and  Home  Civil  Service  School,  which  see. 

No  Lectures  are  given  on  days  marked  thus  (f)  in  the 
Almanac. 

The  Lectures,  both  Ordinary  and  Honor,  are,  as  a  rule,  chiefly 
devoted  to  the  new  business  of  the  Term. 

16.  Privileyes  of  Honor  StudeiUs, 

As  stated  before,  in  any  Term  of  any  year  students  may  substitute  <in 
Honor  Course  of  Lectures  for  the  corresponding  ordinary  Lectures.  In 
the  Freshman  years  Honor  Lectures  iu  Logic  may  be  substituted  for 
the  ordinary  Lectures  in  Mathematics. 

Any  student  who  shall  have  obtained  30  per  cent,  in  Mathematics, 
in  English  Composition,  in  Latin,  and  in  Greek  or  French  or  German 
at  the  Junior  Exhibition  Examination  will  be  allowed  in  the  two 
Freshman  years  to  keep  a  Term  by  Lectures  (on  the  written  recom- 
mendation (if  the  Lectui-er)  if  he  attends  with  diligence  a  course  or 
courses  of  Honor  Lectures,  consisting  of  not  less  than  five  lectures 
weekly  ;  and  if  he  obtains  an  Honor  in  any  subject,  he  will  be  allowed 
credit  for  a  Term  by  Examination,  except  for  the  Final  Freshman 
Examination.  In  the  case  of  Modern  Literature,  students  claiming  the 
above  privilege  are  required  to  take  two  out  of  the  five  subjects  of  the 
course,  viz. :  English  Literature,  French,  Geiman,  Italian,  or  Spanish. 

Junior  Sopbisters  may  obtain  credit  for  a  Terra  by  Lectures  by 
attendance  to  the  satisfaction  of  the  Lecturer  or  Lecturers  at  any 
complete  course  of  Honor  Lectures. 

Senior  Sophisters  who  obtained  an  Honor  in  the  Junior  Sophister 
year  may  obtain  credit  for  a  Term  by  Lectures  by  attendance  to  the 
satisfaction  of  the  Lecturer  or  liCcturers  on  any  group  of  Honor 
Lectures  correspondiug  to  a  Moderatorsbip  Course. 

Sophisters  may  obtain  credit  for  a  Term  by  Examination  (other 
than  the  Degree  Examination)  by  obtaining  a  first  Honor  in  any  course 
or  group  of  courses  corresponding  to  a  Moderatorsbip  Course. 

Note. — Only  such  courses  of  Lectures  or  groups  of  courses  us 
consist  of  not  less  than  five  Lectures  weekly  are  recognised  as  giving 
exemption  under  the  foregoing  rules. 

In  all  cases  in  which  credit  for  Term  by  Lectures  is  sought  under 
the  foregoing  rules,  students  must  notify  the  fact  to  the  Lecturer  at  the 
beginning  of  Lecture  Term.  If  at  the  end  of  Term  the  Lecturer 
is  satisfied  that  such  students  are  entitled  to  credit  for  the  Term,  he  will 
make  a  written  recommendation  to  that  effect  to  the  Senior  Lecturer. 

17.  Catechetical  Terms, 

The  Catechetical  Examinations  are  held  on  the  day  following 
the  Term  Examinations. 

Catechetical  Terms  may  he  kept  by  Lectures,  which  commence 
at  9.30  a.m.  in  the  Examination  Hall  on  the  days  appointed 


CATECHETICAL   TEKMS.  49 

in  the  Almanac,  and  are  continued  at  the  same  hour  on  the  suc- 
ceeding Saturdays. 

18.  The  Languages  required  during  the  Freshman  years,  in 
addition  to  Latin,  are  one  of  the  following : — Greek,  French, 
German,  Irish. 

By  permission  of  the  Senior  Lecturer,  a  student  may  be  allowed 
to  present  Italian,  Spanish,  or  Russian,  as  a  Modern  Language  at 
any  ordinary  Examination.  The  courses  in  Italian  and  Spanish 
are  given  in  §  34. 

The  Examinations  in  Modern  Languages  are  partly  viva  voce 
in  the  prescribed  books ;  and  partly  by  papers  containing  passages 
(unpreseribed)  for  translation  from  these  languages,  and  passages 
for  translation  from  English  into  the  same. 

Latin  Composition  forms  a  part  of  every  Latin  Examina- 
tion. In  the  translation  of  selected  passages  from  the  Classical 
authors,  separate  weight  will  be  allowed  for  the  style  of  the 
English  Composition. 

The  books  named  under  English  Composition  are  intended  to 
supply  subjects  for  English  Composition.  A  few  questions  will 
also  be  set  on  the  substance  of  the  books. 

The  letters  j).  or  v.  v.,  or  p.  &  <?.  v.,  added  in  parentheses 
after  a  subject  in  the  Freshman  years,  denote  that  the  Exami- 
nation in  that  subject  is  usually  conducted  by  papers,  or  invd 
voce,  or  in  both  ways. 

19.  Junior  Freshman  Year. 

Throughout  the  Junior  Freshman  year,  a  Student  without 
Privileges,  keeping  a  Term  by  Examination,  must  answer  in  all 
the  prescribed  subjects ;  and  keeping  a  Term  by  Lectures,  must 
attend  two  Courses  of  Lectures,  one  Course  in  Science  and  one 
in  Languages. 

Subjects  for  Michaelmas  Lectures  and  Hilary  Examination. 

.Mathematics, Geometry:  as  in  the  Course  for  Entrance 

with  additional  practical  construc- 
tions ;  and  the  Course  comprised  in 
Euclid,  Book  vi.,  but  proofs  which 
apply  only  to  commensurable  quanti- 
ties will  also  be  accepted,  so  that  ratios 
may  be  dealt  with  by  the  ordinary 
processes  of  arithmetic.  Students, 
however,  should  be  able  to  recognize 
why  such  proofs  are  not  immediately 
applicable  to  incommensurables.  A 
more  detailed  syllabus  can  be  obtained 
on  application  {p.  &  v.  v.). 
Arithmetic.  Algebra,  the  first  Four 
Eules,  Fractions,  Surds,  Simple  and 
Quadratic  Equations  {p.). 


50 


COUESE  IN  ARTS. 


Subj  ects  for  Michaelmas  Lectures  and  Hilary  Examination— cow  tin  ued. 
Languages  (p.  &  v.  v.),     . 


III., 
and 


IV. 

one 


with 
of  the 


English  Gohfosition, 


Latin,    Horace,    Odes 

Latin  Composition, 

following  : 
Greek,  Xenophon,  Hellenica,  Bk.  i. 
French,  Merimee,  Colomba. 
German,   Liliencron,    Umzingelt,    Der 

Eichtungspunkt  (Oxford), 
Irish,  O'Leary,  Bricriu. 

Sir  Walter  Scott,  Quentin  Durward  ;  or, 
Selections  from  Tennyson,  Tiresias 
and  other  Poems  (ed.  Rowe  and 
Webb)  [p.). 


Subjects  for  Hilary  Lectures  and  Trinity  Examination. 


Mathematics, 


Languages  {p.  &  v.  v.), 


English  Composition, 


Geometry,  as  before  (p.  &  v.  v.). 
Arithmetic  and  Algebra,  as  before  (p.). 
Trigonometry,  to  the  end  of  Solution  of 

Plane  Triangles  {p.). 
Latin,  Virgil,  ^neid,  Bks.  ii.  and  vii., 

with  Latin  Composition,  and  one  of 

the  following : 
Greek,  Homer,  Odyssey  vi.,  ix. 
French,  About,  Le  Eoi  des  Montagnes. 
German,    Dehmel,    Das    grune    Haus 

(Oxford). 
Irish,  Doyle.  Muintear  na  Tuaithe. 
Sir    Walter    Scott,     Marmion  ;       or, 

De  Quincey,    English    Mail    Coach 

and  Revolt  of  the  Tartars  {p.). 


Subjects  for  Trinity  Lectures  and  Uichaelmas  Examination. 


Mathematics,     .    . 


Languages  {p.  &  v.  v.), 


English  Composition, 


Geometiy  as  before  {p.  &  v.  v.). 
Arithmetic  and  Algebra,  as  before  {p.). 
Trigonometry,  with  the  use  of  Loga- 
rithms {p.), 

Latin,  Livy,  Book  xxi.,  with  Latin 
Composition,  and  one  of  the  following  : 

Greek,  Plato,  Apologia  Socratis. 

French,  Marmier,  Gazida  (Oxford). 

German,  Die  hundert  besten  Gedichte 
(Gowans  and  Gray"). 

Irish,  O'Leary,  Mo  Sg^al  Fein,  pp. 
1-105. 

Shakspere,  Twelfth  Night.  Addison, 
Spectator  Club  Papers  (in  T.  Arnold's 
Selections  from  the  Spectator)  {p.). 


SKNIOE  FRESHMAN  YEAR. 


51 


20.  Senior  Freshman  Year. 

Throughout  the  Senior  Freshman  year,  a  Student  without 
Privileges,  keeping  a  Term  by  Examination,  must  answer  in  all 
the  prescribed  subjects;  and  keeping  a  Term  by  Lectures,  must 
attend  two  Courses  of  Lectures — one  Course  in  Science,  and  one 
in  Languages. 


Subjects  for  Michaelmas  Lectures  and  Hilary  Examination. 

Mathematics,  .  .  .  Geometry,  as  before,  with  the  application  of 
geometrical  methods  to  incommensurable,  as 
well  as  to  commensurable  magnitudes  {v.  v.). 

Arithmetic  and  Algebra,  as  before  (p.). 

Trigonometry,  as  before  {p.), 

Abbott's  Elements  of  Logic  (j).  &  v.  v.). 

Latin,  Sallust,  Catiline,  with  Latin  Com- 
position, and  one  of  the  following  : — 

Greek,  Herodotus,  Book  viii.,  to  end  of 
chap.  99. 

French,  G.  Sand,  La  Mare  au  Diable. 

German,  Lessing,  Minna  von  Barnbelm. 

Irish,  An  Seabhac,  Jimin  Mh.iire,  Tliaidhg. 

English  Composition,  Macaulay,  Essays  on  Hampden  and  Warren 
Hastings.  Goldsmith,  The  Good-natured 
Man  {p-)' 


Logic,  .     .     .     . 

Languages  {p.  &  v.  f .), 


Subjects  for  Hilary  Lectures  and  Trinity  Examination. 

Mathematics,    .     .     .     Geometry,  as  before  {v.  v.). 

Arithmetic  and  Algebra,  as  before  {p.). 

Trigonometry,  as  before  {p.). 
Logic, Aa  before  [p.  &  v.  v.). 

Mathematical  Physics,  Statics  : — Composition  and  Eesolution  of 
(a)  Forces  meeting  in  a  point,  (b)  Parallel 
Forces.  Moments.  Couples.  Centre  of 
Parallel  Forces  and  of  Gravity.  General 
conditions  of  equilibrium  of  coplanar  Forces. 
Friction.     Work.      Simple    Machines    {p, 

&  V.V.). 


Languages  (p.  &  v.  v.), 


English  Composition, 


Latin,  Plautus,  Trinummus,  with  Latin  Com- 
position, and  one  of  (he  following  : — 

Greek,  Euripides,  Alcestis. 

French,  Nodier,  Jean  Sbogar  (Oxford). 

German,  Balladen  und  Romanzen,  pp. 
(Macmillan). 

Irish,  R.  Ni  Ogain,  Duanaire  Gaedhilge. 

George    Eliot,     Scenes      of     Clerical 
Macaulay,  History  of  England,  chap.  iii. 
1)2 


1-93 


Life. 


52 


COURSE   IN    ARTS. 


Subjects  for  Trinity  Lectures  and  the  Final  Freshman 
Examination. 


Mathematics, 


Logic, 


Geometry,  as  before  {v.  v.). 
Arithmetic  and  Algebra,  as  before  {p.). 
Trigonometry,  as  before  {p.}. 

As  before  {p.  &  v.  v.). 


Mathematical  Physics,  Statics,  as  before. 

Dynamics: — Velocity  and  Acceleration.  Mo- 
tion in  a  straight  line.  Mass,  Force,  and 
Weight.  Connexion  between  Mass  and 
"Weight  of  the  same  body.  Absolute  Unit, 
Poundal.  Composition  and  Resolution  of 
Velocities,  Accelerations,  and  Forces.  Motion 
of  a  particle  on  smooth  and  rough  inclined 
planes.  Equality  of  Action  and  Reaction. 
Atwood's  Machine  and  other  simple  cases  of 
rectilinear  motion  of  two  bodies  connected  by 
an  inexteiisible  string  passing  over  a  smooth 
pulley.  Projectiles.  Momentum  and  Im- 
pulse. Impact  or  Collision.  Uniform  circular 
Motion.  Harmonic  Motion.  Pendulum  and 
determination  of  ff.  "Work,  Energy,  and 
Horse-power  {p.  &  v.  v.). 


Languages  {p.  &  v.  v.), 


Latin,  Virgil,  ^neid,  Books  iv.,  vi.,  with 
Latin  Composition,  and  one  of  the  follow- 
ing :— 

Greek,  Homer,  Iliad,  Books  xxii.,  xxiv. 

French,  Vigny,  Cinq  Mars,  Part  ii. 

German,  Freytag,  Die  Journalisten. 

Irish,  O'Leary,  Guaire. 


English  Composition,  Shakspere,  Richard  III. 
Humourists  {p.). 


Thackeray,  English 


At  each  Final  Freshman  Examination  those  Students  who 
obtain  40  per  cent,  and  upwards,  and  whose  answering  in  the 
several  subjects  is  considered  satisfactory  by  the  Senior  Lecturer, 
are  distributed  into  three  Classes,  the  names  in  each  Class  being 
arranged  in  the  order  of  the  percentages  obtained.  The  minimum 
standards  of  Classes  are  : — First  Class,  QOper  cent. ;  Second  Class, 
50  per  cent.:  Third  Class,  40.  Of  the  remaining  Candidates, 
those  whose  answering  is  considered  by  the  Senior  Lecturer  to  be 
sufficient  are  allowed  the  Examination,  and  their  names  are 
arranged  in  alphabetical  order  as  Unclassed  Candidates. 

The  Jellett  Prizes  for  General  Answering,  value  £5  and  £3  re- 
spectively, are  awarded  on  the  result  of  this  Examination 
(see  "Jellett  Prizes"). 

The  award  of  the  Senior  Exhibitions  depends  partly  on  the  marks 
obtained  at  this  Examination  (see  "  Senior  Exhibitions"). 


JUNIOR  SOPHISTER  TEAR.  63 

21.  Privileges  of  Students  in  the  Freshman  Years. 

{a)  For  privileges  granted  to  Honor  Students,  see  §  16. 

(6)  A  special  Arts  Course  has  been  arranged  for  Medical  and 
Dental  Students.  See  "  Arts  Course  of  Medical  and  Dental 
Students." 

(c)  Engineering  Students  may  substitute  the  Mathematical 
Lectures  of  the  Engineering  School  for  the  Ordinary  Science 
Lectures  of  the  Junior  Freshman  or  of  the  Senior  Freshman 
Year,  and  in  the  Michaelmas  Terra  of  tlie  Senior  Freshman  Year 
may  substitute  the  Lectures  in  Formal  Logic  for  the  Lectures  in 
Languages. 

22.  Junior  Sophister  Year. 

In  tlie  Junior  Sophister  Year  the  subjects  for  Lectures  and 
Examinations  are  divided  into  Groups  A,  B,  C,  D,  E  ;  see  §  25. 

Keeping  of  Terms  by  Lectures. 

A  student  without  Professional  Privileges  obtains  credit  for  a 
Term  by  attending  courses  of  Lectures  in  two  subjects  which  must 
be  chosen  from  different  groups. 

The  subjects  on  which  Lectures  are  delivered  each  Term  are 
given  in  §25. 

Each  of  the  five  languages,  Greek,  Latin,  French,  German, 
Irish,  is  represented  by  one  half -course  of  Lectures,  and  attend- 
ance on  two  half" courses  is  necessary  to  keep  the  Term  in 
Languages. 

To  obtain  credit  in  Experimental  Pliysics  or  Chemistry, 
Junior  Sophisters  must  attend  Lectures  as  well  as  Laboratory 
Instruction.  A  fee  of  one  guinea  must  be  paid  to  the  Junior 
Bursar  for  each  Term  for  Laboratory  Instruction  in  Chemistry.' 
The  Term  in  Experimental  Physics  or  Chemistry  cannot  be  kept 
by  attendance  on  Lectures  during  Trinity  Term. 

In  the  Senior  Sophister  year  a  student  cannot  keep  a  Term  bp 
Lectures  in  a  subject  of  Group  D  unless  he  has,  as  a  Junior 
Sophister,  kept  at  least  one  Term  in  the  same  subject.  No  such 
restriction,  however,  applies  to  Examinations. 

To  obtain  credit  in  History,  Junior  Sophisters  must  attend  the 
.Lectures  in  Constitutional  History  and  in  Economic  History,  and 
must  pass  an  examination  in  tlie  work  of  the  Term. 

The  arrangements  as  to  all  Lectures  in  subjects  by  attendance 
on  which  Terms  may  be  kept  are  posted  on  the  Tutors'  doors 
some  days  before  Lectures  begin. 

«  students  in  Arts  miiy  attend  the  Lectures  in  Chemistry  without  payment  for 
the  same,  but  shall  pay  a  fee  of  one  guinea  per  Term  for  Laboratoi-y  Practice  and 
Instniction,  being  liable,  in  addition,  to  pay  for  breakages;  and  persons  not  on 
the  College  Books,  if  admitted  by  the  Board,  shall  pay  two  and  a  half  guineas  per 
Term  for  Lectures  and  Laboratory  I'ractice  and  Instruction. 


64  COUBSE  IN  AETS. 

Keepiny  of  IWrns  by  Examination. 

In  order  to  get  credit  for  any  examination,  a  Junior  Sophister 
must  pass  in  English  Composition  and  in  three  subjects,  not  more 
than  two  of  which  may  belong  to  the  same  Group. 

In  the  Sophister  years  the  examination  in  every  course  except 
English  Composition  is  usually  conducted  both  by  j^aiyers  and 
viva  voce. 

Any  two  of  the  five  languages,  Greek,  Latin,  French,  German, 
Irish,  count  as  one  subject. 

A  Student  selecting  French  or  German  will  be  required  to  write 
a  translation  from  English  into  French  or  German,  in  addition  to 
answering  in  the  books  named  in  §  25. 


23.  Professional  Privileges. 

Junior  Sophisters,  not  Divinity  Students,  who  are  keeping  a 
Term  in  Arts  by  Lectures  (or  by  the  Examination  at  the  com- 
mencement of  the  following  Term),  can  obtain  Professional 
Privileges  by — 

(«)  Attending,  during  the  Term,  three-fourths  of  the  Lectures^  of 
two  of  the  Professors  of  Law,  and  passing  the  Examination 
held  at  the  conclusion  of  those  Lectures. 
Or, 

(J)  Attendance  at  three-fourths  of  the  Professional  Lectures  of  the 
Engineering  School  during  the  Term. 

Or, 

(c)  Attendance,  during  the  Term,  as  Candidates  for  Indian  Civil 
Service,  on  two  full  Courses  of  the  Special  Lectures  provided 
by  the  College  for  such  Candidates. 
Or, 

{d)  Attendance,  during  the  Term,  on  tliree-fourths  of  each  of  three 
Courses  of  Lectures  in  the  School  of  Agriculture. 

But  no  Professional  Privileges  are  allowed  for  a  second  atten- 
dance on  the  same  course  of  Professional  Lectures. 

24.  Junior  Sophisters  having  Professional  Privileges. 

Keejnng  of  Terms  by  Lectures. 

A  Junior  Sophister  having  Professional  Privileges  obtains  credif 
for  a  Term  by  attending  Lectures  in  any  one  of  the  subjects  as 
arranged  for  each  Term  ;  see  §  25. 

Keeping  of  Terms  by  Examination. 

A  Junior  Sophister  having  Professional  Privileges  obtains  credit 
for  a  Term  Examination  by  passing  in  English  Composition,  and 


JITNIGK   SOPHISTEE  TEAK.  55 

iu  two  subjects  taken  from  diffex'eut  Groups  ;  provided  always 
that  an  Engineering  student  may  take  two. subjects  belonging  to 
tbe  same  group,  except  iu  the  case  of  Group  D,  from  which  he 
can  select  one  subject  only. 

For  the  Arts  Course  of  Medical  and  Dental  Students,  see  under 
that  heading. 


25.     Subjects  for  Lectures  and  Examinations  in  the 
Junior  Sophister  Year. 

Subjects  for  Michaelmas  Lectures. 

A.  Mathematical  Physics. 

B.  Languages  : — Greek,  Latin,  Fuench,  Gekman,  Irish.     (Two 
languages  to  count  as  one  subject.) 

C.  Logic. 

D.  Experimental  Physics,  Chemistry,  Botany,  Zoology.     (Four 

subjects.) 

E.  History. 

Subjects  for  Hilary  Examination. 

■  Mechanics : — as  read  in  Senior  Freshman 

year. 
Hydrostatics: — Pressure  at  a  point  in  a 
fluid.  Resultant  pressure  over  an  area. 
Archimedes'  Principle.  Methods  for 
determining  specific  gravity.  Relation 
between  the  volume,  pressure,  andtem- 
perature  of  a  gas.  Weight  of  a  given 
volume  of  a  gas  at  a  given  temperature 
and  pressure.  Barometers.  Diving- 
bell.  Water  Pumps.  Air  Pumps.  The 
Siphon.  Pressure  Gauges.  Balloons. 
Optics: — Galbraith  and  Haughton's 
Manual. 


A,  Mathematical  Physics, 

(Candidates  must  take  all 
three  sections.) 


Languages  (two  languages  to  count  as  one  subject). 

Greek,      ....     Thucydides,  Bk.  vii. 

Latin,       ....     Tacitus,  Agricola. 

French,   ....     Daudet,  Contes  du  Lundi. 

German,    .     -     .     .     Robertson,   The  Literature  of  Germany, 

pp.  73-143  (Home University  Library); 

and  Goethe,  Hermann  und  Dorothea. 
Irish,   .     .  •     •     DiapmuiO    t     SP^^'ti^^,    ed.    O'Duffy 

(Society  for  I'reservation  of  the  Irish 
Language). 

/ 


56  COTTKSE  IN  ARTS. 

C.  Logic — Mill's  Logic,  Book  ii.  and  Book  iii.,  chaps,  i  to  v. 

D.  Experimental    Physics,   Chumistky,   Botany,   and  Zoology 

(detailed  courses  given  below). 

E.  History — Robinson's  History  of  Western  Hurope  (Ginn  &  Co.), 

chaps,  i  to  xxii,  inclusive. 
English  Composition,   .    L.    Stephen  :  Johnson    (English  Men  of 
Letters  Series).     Bagehot:  English  Con- 
stitution (Introduction,  and  chapters  2, 
3,  4,  6). 

Subjects  for  Hilary  Lectures. 

A.  Astronomy. 

B.  Languages  : — Greek,    Latin,    French,    German,   Irish.      (Two 

Languages  to  count  as  one  subject.) 

C.  Logic. 

D.  Experimental  Physics,  Chemistry,  Botany,  Zoology.     (Four 

subjects.) 
E<.  History. 

Subjects  for  Trinity  Examination. 

A.  Mathematical  Physics,    j  Mechanics,  Hydrostatics,  and  Optics,  as 

i  Parker's  Astronomy  (Longmans,  Green, 
&  Co.),  chaps,  i,  ii,  v,  vi,  vii,  viii 
(omitting  §  101),  ix  (to  §  116  incl.), 
xi,  and  xii. 

B.  Languages  (two  languages  count  as  one  subject). 

Greek, Demosthenes,  Olynthiacs  i.,  ii.,  iii., 

and  Philippic  i. 

Latin, Juvenal,  Sat.  iii,  iv,  vii,  viii,  xiv. 

French, Balzac,  Eugenie  Grandet  (in  Oxford 

Higher  French  Series). 
German, Schiller :  Wilhelm  Tell. 

Irish, Stair  Eamuinn  Ui  Chleire,  pt.  i. 

C.  Logic — Mill's  Logic,  Book  in.,  chaps,  i-v,  vii-xiii,  and  xx. 

Bacon's  Novum  Organum,  Book  i.,  Preface  and  Aphorisms, 
1-69,  129,  and  130. 

D.  Experimental  Physics,  Chemistry,  Botany,  Zoology.  (Detailed 

courses  given  below). 

E.  History — Robinson's   History  of  Western  Europe,  chaps,  xxiii  to 

end  of  volume. 

English  Composition,      .     .     J.  Morley  :  Walpole. 

Bacon's  Essays,  the  following  selec- 
tion : — Truth  ;  Death  ;  Revenge  ; 
Adversity]  Goodness,  and  Goodness 
of  Nature  ;  Atheism  ;  Superstition  ; 
Travel  ;  Counsel  ;  Innovations  ; 
Friendship) ;  '  Discourse  ;  Riches  ; 
Nature  in  Men  ;  Custom  and  Educa- 
tion ;  Youth  and  Age ;  Studies. 


JTTWIOR  SOPHISTEK   YEAB.  67 

Subjects  for  Trinity  Lectures. 

A.  AsTUONOMY  (partly  of  a  physical  naUiie). 

B.  Languages  :— Greek,    Latin,     French,    Gennan,    Irish.      (Two 

Languages  to  count  as  one  subject.) 

C.  Psychology. 

D.  ExPEKiMENTAL  Physics,  Ckemistuv,  Botany,  Zooi.ogy.     (Four 

subjects.) 

E.  History.     Education. 

Subjects  for  Michaelmas  Ezaminatiou. 

A.  Mathematical  Physics,     As  before. 

Astronomy,  ....  As  before,  and  Parker's  Astronomy, 
chaps,  iv  and  x,  and  Young's  Manual 
of  Astronomy,  chaps,  ii,  vii,  viii,  ix, 
and  xvi-xx. 

B.  Languages  (two  languages  count  as  one  subject). 

Greek, ^schylus,  Prometheus  Vinctus. 

Latin, Horace,  Satires. 

French, R-  Bazin,  La  Terre  qui  meurt. 

German, Goethe,  Iphigenie  auf  Tauris. 

Irish, P.  O'Leary,  Sfiabna. 

C.  Psychology— Hoffding's  Outlines  of  Psychology;  chaps,  i-iv,  and 

Sectioes  A  and  B  of  chap.  v. 

D.  Experimental   Physics,   Chemistry,    Botany,   and    Zoology 

(detailed  courses  given  below). 

E.  Histoky — Green's  iShort  Eintory  of  the  English  People,  from  the 

Norman  Conquest. 
Education — Monroe,   Text-book  in  the  History  of  Education, 
chaps,  i,  iii,  iv. 
Culverwell,  The  Montessori  Principles  and  Practice. 
Drunimond,  The  Child. 
English  Composition,      .     .     Creighton:  Queen  Elizabeth.  Dickens: 

A  Tale  of  Two  Cities. 

26.  Courses  in  Experimental  Physics  and  Chemistry. 

Experimental  Physics. 

Candidates  must  understand  the  theory  of,  and  know  how  to 
use,  the  instruments  mentioned.  They  must  understand  the 
principles  involved  in  the  measurements  and  experiments,  and 
be  able  to  make  calculations  founded  on  them.  Courses  are 
provided  in  the  Physical  Laboratory  for  Students  requiring 
practical  instruction  in  Physical  Measurements.  They  are  desired 
to  pay  special  attention  to  the  principle  of  the  Conservation  of 
Energy,  as  illustrated  in  the  various  branches  of  Experimental 
Physics. 

sS 

/ 


58  COUKSE  IN  AETS. 

Hilary  Examination. 
General  Properties  of  Matter: 

Measurement  of  space  (length,  area,  volume),  time  and  mass 
(vernier,  micrometer  screw,  pendulum,  balance). 

Characteristics  of  solids,  liquids,  and  gascc  (compression,  and  shear- 
ing strains  and  stresses). 

Measurement  of  pressure  (mercurial  and  aneroid  barometer,  liquid 
manometer). 

Measurement  of  density  (specific  gravity  bottle,  hydrostatic  balance, 
hydrometers  of  variable  immersion). 

Measurement  of  compressibility  of  gases  (Boyle's  tube). 

Heat  : 

Measurement  of  temperature  (construction  of  mercurial  thermome- 
ters, centigrade  and  Fahrenheit  scales,  maximum  and  minimum 
thermometers). 

Measurement  of  coefficients  of  expansion  for  temperature  of  solids, 
liquids,  and  gases  (Roy  and  Ramsden's  method  for  solids  ; 
Dulong's  method,  and  apparent  expansion  in  glass  for  liquids  ; 
air  thermometer  method  for  gases). 

Maximum  density  of  water  (Hope's  experiment). 

Applications  of  expansion  of  solids  (metallic  thermometers,  com- 
pensated pendulums,  &c.). 

Measurement  of  density  of  a  gas  (Regnauit's  experiments). 

Measurement  of  quantitie.?  of  heat. 

Measurement  of  specific  heats  of  solids  (water  calorimeters,  Dulong 
and  Petit' s  law). 

Laws  of  fusion  and  evaporation  (boiling,  eflFact  of  presence  of  other 
gases,  distilling). 

Measurements  of  latent  heats  of  fusion  and  evaporation  (water 
calorimeter.  Black's  ice  calorimeter). 

Freezing  mixtures,  cooling  by  evaporation. 

Measurement  of  mechanical  equivalent  of  heat  (Joule's  experiment). 


Trinity  Examination. 

As  before,  and  in  addition  : — 
Eleciiicity : 

Laws  of  magnetic  force  (torsion  balance). 

Laws  of  magnetic  induction  (magnets  and  magnetic  substances). 

Terrestrial  magnetism  (declination,  dip). 

Lines  of  force  due  to  magnets  and  electric  currents. 

Laws  of  magnetic  force  due  to  electric  currents  (tangent  galvano- 
meters, electro-magnets,  electric  bell). 

Ohm's  law. 

Measurement  of  resistances  and  specific  resistance  (Metre  Bridge, 
Post  Office  Box) . 

Measurement  of  electromotive  forces  (high  resistance  galvano- 
meters). 


I 


JUNIOK  80PHI8TER  YKAR.  69 

Laws  of  electrolysis  (gas  ar.d  copper  voltameters,  electroplating, 

lead  batteries). 
Electromotive  force  due  to  chemical  action  (zinc  copper  and  dilute 

sulphuric  acid,  amalgamation). 
Polarization  of  cells  (bichromate,  Daniell's,  Grove's  and  Bunsen's 

and  Le  Clanche  cells). 
Peltier's  thermo-electric  effect  (thermopile). 

Michaelmas  Examination. 
As  before,  and  in  addition : — 
Sound : 

Simple  vibration.     Loudness,  pitch,  and  tone. 

Measurement  of  frequency. 

Methods  of  maintaining  vibrations,  resonance. 

Vibrations    of    bodies,  loops   and   noies,    laws   of   vibration   of 

stretched  strings. 
Transverse  and  longitudinal  displacements,  organ-pipes. 
Wave    motion,    measurement    of    wave-length    and   velocity  of 

propagation. 
Musical  intervals. 

Liffht:  ^ 

Liglit  propagated  in  right  lines,  rays  ;  pin  optics. 

Laws  of  reflection  and  refraction. 

Measurement  of  angle  between  two  reflecting  surfaces. 

Measurement  of  refractive  index. 

Mirrors  and  lenses,  measurement  of  focal  lengths. 

Dispersion,  spectrum  analysis  and  selective  absorption. 

Photometry. 

Chemistry. 
The  Examinations  are  confined  to  the  leading  facts  and  prin- 
ciples of  the  Science.    Candidates  are  expected  to  be  familiar  with 
the  methods  used  in  the  deduction  of   formula,  and  with  the 
solution  of  such  chemical  problems  as  are  referred  to  in  the  Course. 

Hilary  Examination. 

Inorganic  Chemistry  : — the  non-metals,  hydrogen,  oxygen,  nitrogen, 
and  ihe  halogens,  and  the  chief  compounds  which  these  elements  form 
M'ith  each  other.     Elementary  Chemical  Theory. 

Practical. — Preparation  and  identification  of  the  gaseous  and  other 
substances  included  in  the  above  Course. 

Trinity  Examination. 

Carbon,  silicon,  sulphur,  boron,  phosphorus,  and  their  chief  com- 
pounds. 

Practical. — As  before,  but  including  all  non-metals,  with  systematic 
analysis  for  single  acid  radicles. 

Michaelmas  Examination. 
The  commonly  occurring   metals,   and  their  more  important  com- 
pounds. 

Practical. — Qualitative  examination  for  a  single  metal. 


60 


COUESK  IN  AKTS. 


27.  Courses  in  Zoology  and  Botany. 

Students  are  required  to  have  a  practical,  as  well  as  a  theoreti- 
cal, knowledge  of  the  subjects  of  Examination. 

Hilary  Examination  : — 

Zoology,  (1)  .  The  structure  and  generative  processes  of  Amoeba, 
Vorticella,  Paramoecium,  Opalina,  Nyctotherus 
Monocystis  :  Hydra  and  Obelia.  (Consult  G.  C. 
Bourne's  "  Zoology.") 

Botany,  (2)  .  The  structure  (so  far  as  may  be  made  out  by  means 
of  a  simple  lens)  and  arrangement  of  the  vege- 
tative and  reproductive  organs  of  Seed-Plants, 
as  illustrated  by  the  following  types  :  the  Wall- 
flower [Cheiranihus  Cheiri),  the  Lily  {Lilium 
candidum),  and  the  Fir  {Picea  excelsa). 
Scott's  Introduction  to  Structural  Botany,  Pt.  i., 
pp.  1-26,  136-152,  and  233--238. 
Trinity  Examination  : — 

Zoology,  {})  .  As  before,  and  :  The  structure  and  generative  pro- 
cesses of  Limibicus  or  AUolobophra,  Taenia, 
Ascaris,  and  Distomum.     (Text-book  as  before.) 

Botany,  (^)      .     Outlines   of  the    Physiology  of  Nutrition.      The 

essential  chemical  constitution  of  Plants.     The 

Nutrilion  of  Green  Plants.     Relation  to  Light. 

Movement  of  materials  in  Plants.     Eespiration. 

Scott :  Pt.  I.,  chap.  iii. 

Michaelmas  Examination  : — 

Zoology,  (^)  .  As  before,  and  :  The  structure  and  generative  pro- 
cesses of  Scy Ilium,  Rana,  and  the  Osteology  of  a 
Mammal  such  as  Canis  or  Lepus.  The  embryo- 
logy of  Amphioxus,  Rana,  and  of  Gallus  to  the 
end  of  the  third  day  of  incubation.  (Consult 
Graham  Kerr's  "  Zoology.") 

Botany,  (2)  .  The  arrangement  of  Tissues  in  Seed-Plants,  as 
illustrated  by  the  "Wallflower,  Lily,  arid  Fir. 
The  microscopic  appearance  and  minute  struc- 
ture of  tissues.  The  minute  structure  of  the 
cells  and  modifications  of  cells  found  in  these 
"  types.  The  nature  of  Protoplasm.  The  micro- 
scopic appearance  of  Pollen- grains,  their  growth 
and  life-history.  The  minute  structure  of 
Ovules,  Pollination,  Fertilization,  Production  of 
Seeds. 
Scott:  Pt.  I.,  pp.  26-141,  152-199,  and  238-283. 

28.  Senior  Sophister  Year. 

Jn  the  Senior  Sophister  year  the  subjects  are  divided,  as  in  the 
Junior  Sophister  year,  into  Groups  A,  \S,  C,  1),  E.     See  §31. 

(')  students  are  recommended  to  study  in  the  Zoological  Musenm,  as  they  are  liable 
to  be  examined  practically  in  such  specimens  as  do  not  require  the  microscope  for  their 

"^(2)  Students  are  recommended  to  apply  to  the  Professor  of  Botany  for  material  illus- 
trating the  Course,  as  a  practical  acquaintance  with  the  plants  mentioned  in  the  above 
Syllabus  is  indispensable; 


SENIOR  SOPHISTER  YKAR.  61 

Keeping  of  Hilary  or  Trinity  Term  hy  Lectures. 

In  the  Senior  Sophister  year  a  Student  obtains  credit  for  a  Term 
by  attending  Courses  of  Lectures  in  two  subjects  which  must  be 
chosen  from  different  Groups. 

To  obtain  credit  in  Political  and  Economic  Science,  Senior  Sophis- 
ters  must  attend  the  Lectures  in  Political  Science  and  in  Economics. 

In  Experimental  Pliysics  and  Chemistry,  Laboratory  attendance 
is  necessary,  as  in  the  Junior  Sophister  year,  and  the  arrangements 
as  to  Chemistry  Fees  are  the  same  also. 

No  Senior  Sophister  can  obtain  credit  for  attendance  on 
Lectures  in  Experimental  Pliysics  or  Chemistry  who  has  not 
obtained  credit  for  a  Junior  Sophister  Term  in  the  same  subject ; 
and  no  Senior  Sophister  can  obtain  credit  for  attendance  on 
Lectures  in  Geology  who  has  not,  as  a  Junior  Sophister, 
obtained  credit  for  Botany  and  Zoology.  To  keep  the  Term  in 
a  subject  of  Group  D  requires  attendance  during  three  days 
per  week  only. 

Keej)iny  Senior  Sophister  Terms  by  Examination,  and  passing  the 
Degree  Examination. 

In  order  to  get  credit  for  the  Hilary  or  Trinity  Term  Examin- 
ation, or  for  the  Degree  Examination,  a  Senior  Sophister  must 
pass  in  English  Composition,  and  in  four  other  subjects,  one  at 
least  of  which  must  be  taken  from  Groups  A,  B,  or  1). 

At  each  Degree  Examination,  those  Students  who  obtain  45  per 
cent,  and  upwards,  and  whose  answering  in  the  seveval  subjects 
is  considered  satisfactory  by  the  Senior  Lecturer,  are  distributed 
into  three  Classes,  the  names  in  each  Class  being  arranged  in  the 
order  of  the  percentages  obtained.  The  minimum  standards  for 
Classes  are: — First  Class,  65  per  cent. :  Second  Class,  55  per  cent. ; 
Third  Class,  45  per  cent. 

Of  the  remaining  Candidates,  those  whosa  answering  is  con- 
sidered by  the  Senior  Lecturer  to  be  sufficient  are  allowed  the 
Examination,  and  their  names  are  arranged  in  alphabetical  order 
as  Unclassed  Candidates. 

Candidates  placed  in  the  First  Class  who  have  passed  in  the 
full  course  for  the  Degree  Examination  without  claiming  Profes- 
sional Privileges  are  called  Respondents,  and  are  entitled  to 
receive  honorary  Testimoniums,  which  are  publicly  presented  to 
them  by  the  Chancellor  or  Vice-Chancellor,  at  the  Commencements 
at  which  they  are  admitted  to  their  Degrees,  and  their  names  are 
permanently  recorded  in  the  Calendar  immediately  after  those  of 
the  Moderators. 

Medical  and  Dental  Students  who  claim  Professional  Privileges 
at  the  Degree  Examination  are  classed  according  to  the  marks 
which  they  obtain  in  the  Arts  and  in  the  Professional  portions 
of  this  Examination,  taken  together. 

The  Degree  can  also  be  obtained  on  the  result  of  the  Moderator- 
ship  Examination  :  see  §  34. 


62  COUBSB  IN  AKTS. 

A  Candidate  whose  name  is  on  the  books  of  the  College,  and 
who  has  passed  the  Degree  Examination,  can  present  himself  at 
any  Commencements,  in  order  that  the  Degree  may  be  conferred 
upon  him,  provided  that  he  shall  have  paid  the  Degree  Fee  of  two 
pounds  to  the  Junior  Bursar  on  the  day  before  the  Commencements 
at  latest.  If  his  name  be  not  on  the  Books,  he  must  also  pay  the 
Replacement  I'ee  of  fifteen  shillings  to  the  Junior  Bursar. 

29.  Professional  Privileges  in  the  Senior  Sophister  Year. 

At  the  Hilary  and  Trinity  Examinations,  Divinity  Students 
obtain  Professional  Privileges  if  they  have  credit  for  full 
attendance  on  the  Lectures  of  Archbishop  King's  Professor,  or  the 
Regius  Professor,  and  one  of  the  Assistants,  during  the  Term 
preceding  the  Examination  at  which  they  present  themselves ;  but 
at  the  Degree  Examination  they  obtain  Professional  Privileges 
only  if  they  have  credit  for  a  similar  professional  attendance  for  the 
entire  year  {i.  e.  the  three  Terms)  either  preceding  the  December 
Degree  Examination  of  their  Class,*  or  preceding  the  Degree 
Examination  at  which  they  present  themselves. 

At  the  Michaelmas  and  Hilary  Lectures,  and  the  Hilary  and 
Trinity  Examinations,  Laio,  Engiiieeriny,  Indian  Civil  Service, 
and  AyricuUurul  Students  who  fulfil  the  conditions  in  («), 
{b),  (c),  or  {d),  of  §23,  obtain  Professional  Privileges;  but  at  the 
Degree  Examination  they  obtain  Professional  Pi-ivileges  only  if 
they  have  credit  for  Prof essional  attendance  as  specified  in  (a),  (6), 
(c),  or  {d),  §  23,  for  the  entire  year  [i.e.  the  three  Terms)  either 
preceding  the  December  Degree  Examination  of  their  Class,"  or 
preceding  the  Degree  Examination  at  which  they  present  them- 
selves ;  provided  that,  in  the  case  of  Law  Students,  they  have  also 
credit  for  the  General  Examination  held  in  Trinity  Term. 

The  Arts  Course  of  Medical  and  Dental  Students  is  given  under 
that  }ieading. 

An  Engineering  Student  who  has  passed  his  Engineering 
Degree  Examination  is  granted  Professional  Privileges  in  his 
Senior  Sophister  year,  and  at  his  Degree  Examination. 

30.  Senior  Sophisters  having  Professional  Privileges. 

Keeping  of  Hilary  or  Trinity  Term  by  Lectures. 

In  order  to  get  credit  for  a  Term  of  Lectures,  a  Divinity 
Student  must  attend  Conrses  in  two  subjects  from  diiferent 
Groups  ;  one  of  these  subjects  must  be  either  Greek  and  Latin, 
or  Greek  and  Hebrew.  Or  he  may  substitute  for  Classical 
Lectures  an  Examination  at  the  conclusion  of  the  Lectures.  The 
ordinary  Lectures  in  Greek  are  on  Mondays,  Wednesdays,  and 
Fridays,  and  in  Latin  on  Tuesdays,  Thursdays,  and  Saturdays 

»  That  is  at  the  Michaelmas,  Hilary,  and  Trinity  Terms  of  their  Senior  Sopliister 
Year. 


8ENI0K  SOPHISTER  YEAR  63 

in   the   Senior   Sophister  year.     The    Hebrew  Lectures   are   on 
Tuesdays  and  Thursdays. 

1.  In  order  to  get  credit  for  a  Terra  of  Lectures,  any  other 
Student  who  hds  Profussiimnl  Privilei/es  shall  attend  a  Course  of 
Lectures  in  any  one  subject  (except  in  tlie  case  of  Law  Students, 
Political  and  Economic  Science,  and  in  the  case  of  Engineering 
Students,  Experimental  Physics  and  Chemistry. 

Keeping  of  Hilary  or  IVinily  Term  hy  Examinntiou ,  and 
passing  of  the  Degree  Exandnalion. 

Divinity  Students  having  Professional  Privileges  may  obtain 
credit  for  a  Senior  Sophister  Term  Examination,  or  for  the  Degree 
Examination,  by  passing  in  English  Composition  and  in  three 
subjects,  one  of  which  must  be  Classics. 

In  order  to  get  credit  for  a  Senior  Sophister  Term  Examination, 
or  for  the  Degree  Examination,  otlier  students  who  have  Pro- 
fessional Privileges  must  pass  in  English  Composition  and  in 
three  subjects.  An  Engineering  Student  may  not  take  more  than 
one  subject  from  Group  D. 

31.     Subjects  for  Lectures  and  Examinations  in  the 

Senior  Sophister  Year. 

Subjects  for  Michaelmas,  Hilary,  and  Trinity  Lectares. 

A.  Mathematical  Physics.     Astkonomy. 

[These  Lectures  can  be  taken  only  by  students  who  have  not 
taken  tlieni  as  Junior  Sophisters.] 

B.  Languages: — Greek,  Latin,  French,   German,    Irish.     (Two  lau- 

gujiges  to  count  as  one  subject.) 

C.  rsYCHOLOGV.     Ethics. 

D.  ExpEiuMKNTAii      Phvsics,      Chemistky,      Botany,       Zoology, 

Geology.     (Five  subjects.) 

E.  Economics  and  Political  Science.     Education. 

Subjects  for  Hilary  Examination. 

A.  Mathematical  Physics,  Mechanics,  Hydrostatics,  and  Optics,  as 

in  Junior  Sophister  year. 
Astronomy,   ....     As  before. 

B.  Languages  (any  two  of   Greek — Aristotle,    Nicomachean    Ethics, 

the  following  five).  Book  ii. 

Latin — Cicero,  de  Officiis,  Book  iii. 
French — Taine,  Voyage  aux  Pyrenees. 
German — Schiller,    Wallensteins    Lager 

and  Die  Piccolomini. 
/mA—Oi6eCloinneCuipeann  (Society 
for  Preservation  of   the  Irish 
Language.) 
0.  Psychology,  ....     Iloffding's  Outlines  of  Psychology,  chaps. 

iv,  vi,  and  vii. 
D.  Experimental  Physics, 
Chemistuy,   Botany, 
Zoology,     Geology,    As  in  Courses  given  below. 


64  COUESE   IN  ARTS. 

E.  Political  and  Economic 

Science,     ....  Ilbert's  Parliament;     J.   S.  Nicholson's 
Elements  of  Political  Economy,  Intro- 
duction, Book  i.,  Book  ii. 
Education,   .     •  .     Monroe,    Text-book    in    the    History    of 

Education,  chaps,  v,  vi. 
Bagley,  The  Educative  Process. 
Dewty,  The  School  and  Cliild. 
English  Composition,    Benjamin       Franklin  :        Autobiography. 
Crabhe  :    The  Borough. 

Subjects  for  Trinity  Examination. 

A.  Mathematical  Physics,  As  before. 
AsTKONOMY,    ....     As  before. 

B.  Languages  (any  two  of  Greek — Plutarch's  Life  of  Pericles. 

the  following  five),        Latin — Virgil,  Georgics,  i.  iv. 

French — Sandeau,     Mademoiselle     de    la 

Seigliere.    Labiche  et  Martin, 

^  Le   Voyage   de    M.    Penichon 

(ed.  Wells,  pub.  Harrap). 
German — Schiller,  Wallensteins  Tod. 
Irish — Bergin,     Stories     from    Keating's 
History  of  Ireland. 

C.  Ethics, Plato's  Republic,  Book  iv  (English  trans- 

lation). 

Aristotle's  Nieomachean  Etliics,  Books  i 
and  ii  (English  translation). 

Rogers's  Short  History  of  Ethics,  Intro- 
duction and  Parti.). 

D.  Experimental  Physics, 

Chemistky,  Botany, 

Zoology,     Geology,     As  in  Courses  given  below. 

E.  Political  and  Economic 

Science,    .     .     .     .     J.   S.  Mill's  Representative  Government 
(omitting  chapters  8-12,  inclusive). 
J.  S.  Nicholson's  Elements   of  Political 
Economy,  Book  iii.,  Book  iv.,  Book  v. 
Education,     ....     Monroe,    Text-book   in  the   History   of 
Education,  chaps,  vii,  viii,  ix,  and  x. 
Adams,  Herbartian  Psychology. 
Welton,  Logical  Bases  of  Education. 
English  Composition,     Carlyle :  Heroes  (Lectures  3,  5,  and  6). 
More  :  Utopia  (English  Translation). 

Subjects  for  tlie  Degree  Examination. 

A.  Mathematical  Physics,  .     As  before. 
AsTuoNOMY, As  before. 

B.  Languages  (any  two  of  the     Greek — Plato,  De  Republica,  Book  iii. 

following  five),  Latin — Horace,  Epistles,  including  the 

Art  of  Poetry. 
French — V.  Hugo,  Legends  des  Siecles 
(selection    in    Oxford    Higher 
French   Series). 


615NIOR  S0PHI8TEU  YEA£.  65 

German — Faust,  Erster  Teil. 

JmA— Oi&e  CloiTiTie  Uifnig  and 
Oi&e  Cloinne  Lip  (Society  for  the 
Preservation  of  the  Irish  Lan- 
guage) 

C.  Psychology Hoffding's    Outlines    of    Psychology, 

chaps,  i,  ii,  iii,  iv,  sections  A  and  B 

of  chap.  V,  and  chaps,  vi,  vii. 
Ethics, As  before,  and  Kogers's  Short  History 

of  Ethics,  Part  II. 
Butler's   Sermons   i,   ii,   and  iii,   with 

Preface  and  Dissertation  on  Virtue. 
MacKenzie's  Manual  of  Ethics,  Books  i 

and  ii. 

D.  ExPEniMENTAL       PhYSICS, 

Chemistry,       Botany, 

Zoology,  Geology,   As  in  Courses  gven  helow. 

E.  Political  and  Economic 

Science, The  Courses  appointed  for  Hilary  and 

Trinity  Examinations,  together  with 
S.  liOw's  Governance  of  England. 

Education, Monroe,  Text-book  in  the  History  of 

Education,  chaps,  xi  to  end. 

Spencer's  Education  —  Intellectual, 
Moral,  and  Physical. 

Newman's  Idea  of  a  University  Defined, 
Discourses  v,  vi,  vii,  in  Part  I,  and 
in  Part  II,  Discourses  i,  ii,  and  iii 
(omitting  §§  1,  2),  and  iv  (omitting 

H). 
Culver  well,  as  before,  omitting  chap.  vu. 
Bagley,  as  before,  chaps,  i-xv. 
Adams,  as  before,  omitting  chaps,  iv, 

vii,  viii,  and  ix. 
English  Composition,     .     Shakspere  :    Julius   Caesar.     Seeley : 

Expansion  of  England. 

32.    Courses  in  Experimental  Physics  and  Chemistry. 

Experimental    Physics. 
(Hilary  Examination.) 
As  before  in  Junior  Sophister  year,  and  in  addition  : — 

General  Properties  of  Matter : 

Molecular  theory  of  structure  of  solids,  liquids,  and  gases  (dift'usion) 

Measurement  of  elasticity  of  solids  (stretching,  torsion). 

Calculation  of  work  done  by  elastic  forces. 
Heat : 

Measurement  of  relation  of  temperature  and  pressure  of  saturated 
vapours  (manometer  tube  method). 

Ilygiometry  (hygrometers,  chemical,  dew-point,  wet  and  dry  bulb). 

Specific  heat  of  a  liquid  (method  of  mixtures,  tooling  method). 

Convection  of  heat  (hot  air  and  hot  water  warming  apparatus). 

Measurement  of  conductivity  for  bad  conductors  (cooling  of  jacketed 
hot  water  tin). 


66  COUESE  IN  ARTS. 

Conductivity  and  dilfusivity  of  good  conductors  (Ingenhaus'  ex- 
periment by  melting  wax). 

Laws  of  Radiation  (null  method  with  thermopile). 

Equality  of  radiating  and  absorbing  powers. 

Selective  absorption  of  transparent  bodies 

General  principle  of  steam-engine  (furnace,  boiler,  cylinder,  con- 
denser, piston,  crank,  eccentric,  slide  valve). 

(Trinity  Examinatiqn.) 
As  before  and  in  addition  : — 

Electricity : 

Molecular  nature  of  magnetism  (broken  magnets). 

Comparison  of  moments  of  magnets  (deflection  method). 

Measurement  of  pressure  by  potentiometer. 

Internal  resistance  of  cell,  arrangement  of  cells. 

Moving  coil  galvanometers. 

Laws  of  electro-magnetic  induction  (Faraday's  experiment,  Arago's 

disc,  Lenz's  law,  law  of  induced  electro-motive  force). 
Machines  transforming  mechanical  into   electro-magnetic    energy 

(Clarke's  magneto.  Gramme  dynamo). 
Machines  transforming  electro-magnetic  into    mechanical    energy 

(dynamo   used   as    motor,    Morse    telegraph,    telephone  and 

microphone) . 
Machine  altering  electro-magnetic  energy  (Ruhmkorff's  coil). 
Measurement  of  heat  due  to  electric  current  (glow  and  arc  lamps). 

Electrontaties : 

Laws  of  electric  action  (Coulomb's  balance). 

Distribution  on  conductor  (proof  plane,  hollow  conductor). 

Induction  (ice-pail  experiment,  Leyden  jar). 

Electroscopes. 

Electric  disi^barges  (points,  lightning  conductors). 

Cylinder  and  plate  machines,  electrophorus,  induction  machines. 

Capacity  of  a  conductor,  comparison  of  two  capacities. 

(Deokee  Examination.) 
As  before. 

Chemistry. 

(Hilary  Examination.) 

The  paraffins  and  their  chief  derivatives. 

Practical. — Analysis  of  simple  soluble  and  insoluble  salts. 

(Trinity  Examination.) 

The  olefines  and  their  chief  derivatives.    Urea.    Fats  ;    saponification 
and  hydrolysis.      Sugars,  starch,  cellulose. 

Practical. — As  before,  with  identification  of  common  organic  acids.  ■ 

(Degree  Examination.) 
Acetylene,  benzene,  and  its  more  important  derivatives.     Pyridine, 
and  its  derivatives  ;   the  alkaloids. 

Practical. — As  before,  with  identification  of  the  commoner  alkaloids. 


SENIOR  S0PHI8TER  TEAK. 


67 


33.     Courses  in  Zoology,  Botany,  and  Geology. 

UiLAKY  Examination. 

Zoology  (')  .  .  All  the  work  of  the  Junior  Sophister  Year,  an.l  the 
senior  course  lectured  on  by  the  Professor  of 
Zoology  and  Comparative  Anatomy  in  Michael- 
mas Term.  (Refer  to  Shepley  and  MacBride's 
♦'  Zoology.'") 

Botany,  (2)     .     .     The  Structure  and  Life-history  of  Ferns  as  illustrated 
by  the  Male  Fern  (^s;;iii«'«  Ft/ia;-wrt«). 
The  Structure  and  Life-history  of  a  Moss,   e.g. 

Fnnaria  hygrometrica. 
Scott :  Pt.  II.,  pp.  37-77,  and  126-145. 

Geology,  (•^)  .  .  Watts'  Geology  for  Beginners,  chaps,  i.  to  ix.  inclu- 
sive, and  xii.  ;  or,  the  course  lectured  on  by  the 
Professor  of  Geology  in  Michaelmas  Term. 

Trinity  Examination. 

Zoology,  {})  .  .  As  before,  and  the  senior  course  lectured  on  by  the 
Professor  of  Zoology  and  Comparative  Anatomy 
in  Ilihu-y  Term.     (Text-book  as  before  ) 

Botany,  (^)     .     .     The  structure,  life-history,  and  mode  of  nutrition 
of    Fungi,    as    illustrated    by    the    Mushroom 
{Agaricus    campestris),    and   the  seedling-blight 
{Pythium  liaryanum). 
Scott :  Pt.  II.,  pp.  216-228,  266-271. 

Geology. (^)  ,  .  "Watts,  chaps,  xvi.-xxi.  inclusive;  or  the  Lectures 
of  the  Professor  of  Geology  in  Hilary  Term. 

Degree  Examination. 

Zoology,  (*)  .  .  As  before,  with  the  senior  course  lectured  on  by 
the  Professor  of  Zoology  and  Comparative 
Anatomy  in  Trinity  Term.  (Text-book  as 
before.) 

Botany,  (*)  .  .  All  the  work  of  the  Junior  and  Senior  Sophister 
Years.  The  external  characteristics,  microscopic 
structure,  &c.,  modes  of  nutrition  and  repro- 
duction of  Algae,  as  illustrated  by  I'elvetia  cana- 
liculata  and  Spirogyra  longata.  The  chief 
characteristics  of  the  great  subdivisions  of  the 
Vegetable  Kingdom. 
Scott:  Part  ii.,  pp.  168-174,  189-201,  and  290- 
306. 

Geology,  (^)   •     •     Watts'  Geology  for  Beginners.     Parts  specified  for 
both  Hilary  and  Trinity  Examinations. 

(1)  ^tuaents  are  recommended  to  study  in  the  Zoological  Mu!>eum,  as  they  are  liable 
to  be  examined  practically  in  such  specimens  as  do  not  require  the  microscope  for  their 
recognition. 

(J)  Students  are  recommended  to  apply  to  the  Professor  ot  Botany  for  material  illus- 
trating the  Course,  as  a  practical  acquaintance  with  the  plants  mentioned  in  the  above 
Syllabus  is  indispensable. 

(»)  The  Professor  of  Geology  will,  on  application  from  the  Student,  give  access  to 
specimens  illustrating  the  Course. 


68  COURSE   IN    ARTS. 

34.  Courses  in  Italian  and  Spanish  for  Ordinary 
Examinations. 

By  permission  of  the  Senior  Lecturer,  a  student  may  be  allowed 
to  present  Italian,  Spanish,  or  "Russian  as  a  Modern  Language  at 
an  ordinary  Examination. 

ITALIAN. 
Junior  Fkeshmen. 

Hilary, — D'Aiinunzio  :  Prose  Scelte  (Milan,  Trercs);  Selections  (apply 
to  the  Professor  of  Romance  Languages  for  details). 

Trinity. — Carducci :  Antologia  Carducciaita  (Bologna,  Zanichelli) ; 
Selections  (apply  to  the  Professor  for  details). 

Michaelmas. — Leopardi:  Prose  Morali  (Florence,  Sansoni)  ;  Dialoghi 
only. 

Senior  Freshmen. 

Hilary. — Le  Cento  Migliori  Liriche  (Gowans  and  Gray). 

Trinity. — Fogazzaro  :  Piccolo  mondo  antico. 

Michaelmas. — Tasso  :  Gerusalemme  liberata,  cantos  i-vi. 

Junior  Sophisteus. 
Hilary. — Dante  :  Inferno. 
Trinity. — Dante  :  Piirgatorio. 
Michaelmas. — Dante  :   Paradise. 

Senior  Sop  misters. 
Hilary. — Giacosa  :  II  Conte  rosso. 
Trinity .—VoVumm) :  Le  Stanze,  L'Orfeo  e  le  Rime. 
Degree — Tasso  :  L'Aminta.     Carducci :  Saggi  sul  Tasso. 

SPANISH. 

Junior  Freshmen. 

Hilary. — Moratin  :  El  Si  de  las  Ninas  (Ginn). 

Trinity. — Cervantes:  El  Licenciado  Vidrieia  (ed.  Peers, 'pub.  Harrap). 
Michaelmas. — Le  Sage  :   Los  Ladroiies  de  Asturias  (ed.  Kirkpatiick, 
pub.  Cambridge  University  Press). 

Senior  Freshmen. 
Hilary — V.   Blasco  Ibaiiez  :    Capitulos  Escogidos  (ed.  Woolf,  pub. 
Harrap) . 

JVi«i<y.— Cervantes:  Don  Quijote,  Selections  (ed.  Ford,  pub.  Harrap). 
Michaelmas.— Azoiin  :  Al  Margen  de  los  Cl&sicos  (Madrid,  Residencia 
de  Estudiantes). 

Junior  Sophisteus. 

Hilary — Gil  y  Za.rate  :  Guzni&n  el  Bueno  (ed.  Primer,  pub.  Ginn). 
I'rinity. — Garcilaso  de  la   Vega  :   Eglogas,   Poesias  Varias  (Oxford 

University  Press). 
Michaelmas. — Jose    de  Armas:   El   Quijole   y   su   Epoca    (Madrid, 
Renaciniiento). 


•  A  student  taking  lectnres  in  Russian  is  charged  a  special  fee  of  £2  2s.  a  Term. 


honors  and  prizes.  69 

Senior  Sophisteks. 

Hilary. — Calderon  :  El  Alcalde  de  Zulamea  (ed.  Geddes,  pub.  Harrap). 

Trinity. — Calderon :  La  Vida  es  Sueno  (ed.  Comfort,  pub.  American 
Book  Co.,  New  York). 

Degree — Lope  de  Vega :  La  Moza  de  Cautaro  ed.  Stathers,  pub. 
Henry  Holt  &  Co.,  New  York). 

35.  Honors  and  Frizes. 

A  number  of  Studentships,  Scholarships,  Exhibitions,  Prizes, 
Honors,  and  Sizarships,  are  awarded  each  year  to  deserving 
Students,  both  in  the  Arts  Course  and  in  the  Professional  Schools. 
A  summary  of  these  is  given  further  on  ;  see  "  Summary." 

It  is  a  condition  precedent  to  the  award  of  every  Prize  that 
sufficient  merit  must  be  shown. 

Some  of  the  Honors  and  Prizes  specially  connected  with  the 
regular  Undergraduate  Course  are  enumerated  below.  For 
further  particulars  concerning  these  and  the  other  Prizes,  see 
•  Honor  Courses,'  '  Scholarships,'  *  Moderatorships,'  and  'Special 
Prizes.' 

For  Prizes  obtainable  in  connexion  with  Entrance,  see  §  4. 
Prizes  obtainable  at  Lectures, 

In  the  Freshman  years  two  premiums  of  the  value  of  £1 10«.  in 
books  are  awarded,  one  in  each  class,  each  Term,  for  proficiency 
in  Classical  Composition,  on  the  recommendation  of  the  Lecturer, 
to  students  who  have  attended  not  less  than  five- sixths  of  the 
Honor  Lectures  in  Classics  and  in  Classical  Composition.  No 
student  can  obtain  more  than  one  prize  in  any  one  academic  year. 
Similar  prizes  are  similarly  awarded  to  students  in  French  and 
to  students  in  German. 

The  Professor  of  English  Literature  is  authorized  to  recommend 
for  two  Prizes  of  the  value  of  £1  10«.  each  in  books,  in  Com- 
position, the  best  Candidates  among  the  Students  attending  his 
Class  (luring  the  Torm,  one  for  Freshman  Students  and  the 
other  for  Sophisters. 

Catechetical  Premiums. 

Catechetical  Premiums  of  the  value  of  £2  in  books  are  awarded 
in  accordance  with  the  conditions  given  under  *  Catechetical 
Course.' 

Term  Honor  and  Prize  Examinations. 

In  each  Term,  Examinations  are  held,  at  which  Honors  of  the 
First  and  Second  Rank  are  awarded  to  Candidates  who  exhibit 
sufficient  merit.  In  Michaelmas  Term,  Prizes  to  the  value 
of  £4  and  £2  are  awarded  to  the  Candidates  who  obtain  First 

/ 


70  HONOKS  AND  PHIZES. 

and  Second  Honors  respectively."  The  successful  Candidates 
can  select  Books,  to  the  value  of  their  Prizes,  at  the  University 
Booksellers,  and  can  have  the  College  arms  stamped  on  the  covers 
of  bound  Books  ;  or  in  the  case  of  Prizes  in  Experimental  or  Natural 
Science,  Scientific  Instruments,  with  an  inscription  thereon,  may 
be  substituted  for  books,  if  approved  by  the  Senior  Lecturer  on  the 
report  of  the  Professor. 

The  marks  at  certain  of  these  Examinations  count  towards  the 
Senior  Exhibitions  (see  under  'Senior  Exhibitions'). 

Subjects  of  Honor  and  Prize  Examinations. 


{a)     Mathematics. 

{b)     Classics. 

(c)      Mental      and      Moral 

Philosophy. 
{d)     Experimental  Science. 
(e)     Natural  Science. 
(/)   History    and    Political 
Science. 


{g)  English  Literature. 

(A)  French. 

[i)  German. 

{j)  Italian. 

{k)  Spanish. 

{I)  Legal  and  Political  Science. 

{m)  Old  and  Middle  Irish. 


No  Student  who  has  dropped  a  Class  will  be  allowed  to  present 
himself,  as  a  Candidate  for  Honors,  at  any  Examination,  in  a  sub 
ject  in  which  he  has  previously  obtained  Honors  at  the  correspond- 
ing Examination  of  the  Class  from  which  he  has  dropped. 

All  students  desiring  to  compete  at  any  Honor  or  Prize  Exami 
nation  in  any  Term  are  required  to  give  notice  to  the  Senior 
Lecturer,  at  least  one  fortnight  before  the  last  day  of  Lectures  in 
the  preceding  Term,  of  the  particular  Examinations   at  whicl: 
they  intend  to  present  themselves. 

The  dates  of  Honor  and  Prize  Examinations  in  any  Term  are 
not  given  in  the  Almanac,  but,  after  the  required  notices  have 
been  received,  a  programme  is  published  before  the  end  of  the 
preceding  Term. 

In  special  cases  the  Senior  Lecturer  may  (should  it  be  found 
possible)  admit  to  Honor  or  Prize  Examinations  Candidates  wlio 
have  given  tardy  notice  fourteen  days  before  the  date  of  the 
Examination,  on  payment  of  a  fine  to  be  fixed  by  him,  not 
exceeding  2i)s. 

Moderator  ship  and  Medal  Examination, 

A  Student  who  desires  to  graduate  in  Honors  at  the  Degree  may 
substitute  one  of  the  Moderatorship  Examinations  for  the  ordinary 


»  Resolution  of  tlie  Board  : — 

"  It  is  ordered  by  tlie  Board  that  the  Students  who  obtain  College  Premiums  may 
direct  the  CoUeRe  Booksellers  to  procure  for  them  any  suitable  books  as  Premiums 
which  continue  to  be  olfered  for  sale  in  the  priced  catalogues  of  London,  Dublin,  or 
Kdinburgh,  and  at  the  prices  marked  in  the  said  catalogues ;  and  when  the  selling  jnice 
of  a  book  is  recognised  by  the  Trade  as  having  fallen  below  the  publication  price,  the 
College  Booksellers  are  to  supply  the  book  at  such  recognised  reduced  price. 

"  This  notice  is  to  be  printed  and  put  in  two  conspicuous  places  in  the  Booksellers' 
Shops," 


HONORS  AND  PKIZES.  71 

Degree  Examination.     Moderatorships  are  granted  in  groups  of 
the  subjects  of  the  Honor  Courses,  and  in  Engineering  Science. 

Of  the  successful  Candidates  in  the  several  departments,  there 
are  two  ranks,  called  Senior  and  Junior  Moderators. 

The  Senior  Moderators  receive  gold  medals,  and  the  Junior  Mode- 
rators silver  medals  ;  which  are  given  to  them  publicly  before  the 
University,  by  the  Chancellor  or  Vice-Chancellor,  at  the  Commence- 
ments at  which  they  are  admitted  to  their  Degrees.  The  first 
Senior  Moderator  in  each  department  receives  a  large  gold  medal, 
if  recommended  by  the  Examiners  and  their  recommendation  be 
approved  by  the  Board. 

Prizes  are  also  awarded  to  the  Moderators  in  order  of  merit. 

A  Student  who  has  dropped  a  Class  after  the  Michaelmas  Ex- 
amination of  the  Junior  Sophister  year,  or  who  has  dropped  more 
than  one  Class,  will  be  allowed  to  compete  at  any  of  the  Moderator- 
ship  Examinations,  but,  if  successful,  he  will  not  be  given  a 
medal,  nor  will  he  be  placed  in  order  of  merit  amongst  the 
Moderators,  but  will  be  added  to  the  list  as  a  Supplemental 
Moderator,  Senior  or  Junior ;  and  he  will  not  be  entitled  to  the 
Exhibition  of  £10,  awarded  to  Scholars  who  become  Senior 
Moderators  (see  under  "  Exhibitions  awarded  to  Scholars"). 

A  Student  who  would  not  be  entitled  to  present  himself  at  the 
ordinary  Degree  Examination  until  January,  will  not  be  permitted 
to  compete  for  a  Moderatorship  unless  he  previously  obtains  the 
special  permission  of  the  Board. 

A  Student  who  fails  in  obtaining  a  Moderatorship  may  never- 
theless be  allowed  the  Degree  on  his  answering  at  the  Moderator- 
ship  Examination,  provided  a  special  recommendation  to  that 
eiFect  be  made  by  the  Court  of  Examiners,  and  his  name  may 
then  be  placed  at  the  foot  of  such  class  as  the  Senior  Lecturer 
may  determine. 

No  Student  will  be  allowed  to  be  a  Candidate  at  the  Moderator- 
ship  Examination  unless  his  Fees  for  the  current  half-year  shall 
have  been  paid  before  the  first  day  of  Examination. 

All  Candidates  for  Moderatorship  are  required  to  give  notice  to 
the  Senior  Lecturer  of  their  intention  to  compete,  stating  the 
Courses  in  which  they  desire  to  present  themselves,  and  the 
Special  Subjects  (if  any)  which  they  are  taking.  This  notice 
must  be  given  on  or  before  June  15th  of  the  year  in  which  they 
intend  to  compete. 

The  dates  of  each  Moderatorship  Examination  are  not  published 
in  the  Almanac,  The  Senior  Lecturer,  after  receiving  the  infor- 
mation required  on  or  before  June  15th,  arranges  the  dates  and 
periods  of  each  Moderatorship  Examination,  and  publishes  them 
before  the  end  of  Trinity  Term. 

In  arranging  the  time  table  for  Moderatorship  Examinations, 
care  is  taken  to  afford  equal  opportunities  to  candidates  for 
Studentships. 


72  flONOKS    AND   PRIZES. 

It  is  the  duty  of  the  Courts  of  Examiners  for  the  several 
Moderatorships  to  secure  that  in  the  case  of  alternative  papers  an 
approximately  uniform  standard  shall  be  maintained. 

A  Student  who  has  passed  for  his  Degree,  either  at  the  ordi- 
nary Examination,  or  at  a  Moderatorship  Examination  at  which 
he  has  failed  to  obtain  a  Moderatorship,  will  be  allowed  to  compete 
for  a  Supplemental  Moderatorship  within  two  years.  An  extension 
of  that  period  can  be  granted  only  by  special  permission  of  the 
Board. 

A  Graduate  who  has  obtained  a  Moderatorship  at  his  Degree 
shall  be  allowed  to  compete  for  a  Supplemental  Moderatorship  in 
another  subject  in  either  of  the  two  following  years,  he  replacing 
his  name  for  the  Examination  and  paying  the  current  half-yearly 
fee. 


(     -3     ) 


CnterJ^etical  C0ursc. 

S'rovision  has  been  made  for  the  religious  instruction  of  Students. 
Catechetical  Lectures  commence  on  the  days  specified  in  the  Uni- 
versitj'  Almanac,  at  half-past  nine  o'clock,  and  are  continued  on 
Saturdays  during  Term  at  the  same  hour,  for  the  two  Freshman 
Classes  only .  Catechetical  Examinations  are  held  at  the  beginning 
of  each  Term  (immediately  after  the  Term  Examinations)  for  the 
benefit  of  those  Students  who  have  not  been  resident  during  the 
preceding  Term. 

Rules  relating  to  Catechetical  Terms  and  Examinations. 

To  get  full  credit  for  Catechetical  Terms,  with  certificates  of  the 
satne,  four  Terms  are  to  be  saved  in  the  Freshman  years,  either  by 
Lectures  or  by  Examinations.  Omitted  Terms  may  be  supplementalized 
in  the  Sophister  ye.irs  for  special  reasons  to  be  approved  of  by  the 
Catecbist.  In  such  cases  credit  for  two  Terms  within  the  same  College 
Term  will  only  be  given  if  one  of  the  two  is  kept  by  Lectures  and  the 
other  by  Examination. 

Parents  and  guardians  who  desire  that  students  under  their  cliarge 
shall  attend  Catechetical  Lectures  or  Examinations  should  notify  the 
Catecbist,  who  will  inform  them  as  to  what  lectures  or  examinations 
are  attended. 

To  a  Student  who  exhibits  peculiar  merit,  either  at  Lectures  or  at  an 
Exiimination,  a  Premium  in  books  of  the  value  of  £2  is  awarded,  unless 
such  a  Premium  has  been  previously  obtained  in  the  same  year,  in  which 
case  a  Certificate  is  awarded  instead. 

The  fact  of  having  obtained  a  Prize  in  the  earlier  part  of  the  year 
does  not  debar  a  Senior  Freshman  from  being  awarded  one  of  the 
Prizes  offered  at  the  end  of  Trinity  Term,  or  at  the  Michaelmas 
Examination. 

At  all  Examinations  for  Catechetical  Prizes  there  shall  be  a  paper 
as  well  as  an  oral  examination. 

Catechetical  Lectures  and  Examinations  are  conducted  by 
(rt)  Fellows  of  the  College,  being  Members  of  the  Church  of  Ireland; 
{b)  Professors  or  Lecturers  in  the  Divinity  School ;  (c)  Ministers 
nominated  by  the  Presbytery  of  Dublin  whose  names  l\ave  been 
submitted  to  and  approved  of  by  the  Board ;  and  [d)  by  any 
Presbyterian  Fellow  of  the  College  appointed  by  the  Catecbist. 

The  Board  of  Trinity  College  are  willing,  on  due  application 
being  made  to  them  by  the  heads  of  other  religious  denominations, 
to  make  similar  arrangements  for  the  religious  instruction  of 
Students  of  such  denominations. 

Subjects  of  Catechetical  Examinations. — The  following  Table  con- 
tains the  subjects  of  the  Catechetical  Lectures  and  Examinations : — 

N.  B. — The  subjects  printed  in  Italics  are  to  be  considered  as 
additional  for  Honors,  and  are  not  required  generally. 

E 


74 


CATECHETICAL   COURSE. 


Mich.  Term  and 
Hilary  Exam. 

Hilary  Term  and 
Trinity  Exam. 


Trinity  Term  and 
Mich.  Exam. 


JUNIOR  FEESUMEK. 

(  The  Gospel  of  St.  Luke. 
\  The  three  other  Gospels. 

i  The  Acts  of  the  Apostles. 

I  Faley's    Horee    PaulincB   (omitting   xi-xv),   and 

\      Stalker's  Life  of  St.  Paul. 

f  "  The  Church  Catechism  Explained,"  by  A.  W. 
I      Robinson  (Church  of  Ireland). 
I  The  Epistle  to  the  Hebrews  (Church  of  Ireland). 
<^  Dr.   Alex.   "Whyte  on  the   Shorter   Catechism, 
I      Questions  82-107.     (Presbyterian  Church.) 
I  Godet's  Biblical  Studies  on  the  Old  Testament. 
[_     Essays  iv.,  v.,  vi.     (Presbyterian  Church.) 


Mich.  Term  and 
Hilary  Exam. 


Hilary  Term  and 
Trinity  Exam. 


Trinity  Term  and 
Mich.  Exam. 


SENIOR  FRESHMEN. 

f  Genesis,  and  the  first  twenty  chapters  of  Exodus, 
j  The  remainder  of  Exodus,  with  the  Books  of 
"^1      Leviticus    {chaps.     10,    14,    16,    23,    24,    25), 

|_     Numbers,  and  iJeuteronomy. 

f  The  two  Books  of  Samuel,  and  first  eleven  chap- 
<^      ters  of  first  Book  of  Kings, 
l^  The  Books  of  Joshua,  Judges,  and  Ruth. 

'The  first  Book  of  Kings,  chap.  12  to  end,  and  the 
second  Book  of  Kings  (Church  of  Ireland). 
The  Books  of  Ezra,  Nehemiah,  Haggai,  Zechariah, 
chaps.  1-8,  and  Malachi.   (Church  of  Ireland.) 
Lindsay,  The  Eeformation,  Parts  i.,  ii.,  and  iv. 
I      (Presbyterian  Church.) 

I  Godet's  Lectures  in  defence  of  the  Christian  Faith, 
\^     Essays  i.,  v.,  vi.  (Presbyterian  Church). 

A  system  of  Catechetical  Examinations  is  extended  over  ihs  two 
Sophister  years,  and  the  Catechist  is  authorized  to  grant  a  special 
Certificate  to  Students  who  have  passed  with  credit  four  of  these 
Examinations,  of  which  two  at  least  must  be  in  the  Senior  Sophister 
year,  one  being  the  Michaelmas  Examination  of  that  year. 

The  Catechist  is  authorized  to  extend  his  Premiums  to  the  Sophister 
Classes. 

Sophister  Candidates  must  give  not  less  than  one  week's  notice  to 
the  Catechist  of  their  intention  to  eit  for  an  Examination. 

Junior  Sophisters. 

Hilary  Exam.,  .  Epistles  to  the Ephesians,  Colossians,  1  Timothy, 
2  Timothy,  and  Philemon. 

J.  Armitage  Eobinson's  The  Study  of  the 
Gospels.     (Church  of  Ireland.) 

Dr.  JamesMoffatt's  PaulandPaulinism.  (Pres- 
byterian Church.) 


CATECHETICAL  C0UK8K, 


75 


Trinity  Exam.,  . 


Michaelmas  Exam., 


Epistles  to  the  Romans  and  Galatians. 

B.    F.   Westcott's  The  Bible  in  the   Church. 

(Church  of  Ireland.) 
Dr.    David  Brown's    Handbook    on   Eomans. 

(Presbyterian  Church.) 
Epistles  to  the  Corinthians  (1  and  2). 
A.    riummer's    The    Church    of    the    Early 

Fathers.     (Church  of  Ireland.) 
Bishop    Temple's     The    Faith     and     Modem 

Thought.     (Presbyterian  Church.) 


Hilary  Exam., 


Tkinity  Exam., 


Michaelmas  Exam., 

(For  Candidate 

Bachelors.) 


Senior  Sofhisters. 

Isaiah  i-xxxiii,  in  the  Authorised  and  Sevised 

Versions. 
Hooker's  Ecclesiastical  Polity,  Book  v,   1-68. 

(Church  of  Ireland.) 
Macpherson's  Westminster  Confession  of  Faith, 

Introduction  and   chaps    i,  ii,  vi,  and  viii. 

(Presbyterian  Church.) 

Jeremiah  i-xlv,  in  the  Authorised  and  Revised 

Versions. 
Perry's  History  of  the  Reformation  in  England. 

(Church  of  Ireland.) 
Lord   Balfour   of    Burleigh's    The   Rise    and 

Development  of  Presbyterianisni  in  Scotland. 

(Presbyterian  Church.) 

Hosea-Zephaniah  (incl.)  in  the  Authorised  and 

Revised  Versions. 
A.  B.  Davidson's  Biblical  and  Literary  Essays. 


£  2 


(-  76     ) 


Jitejision  jof  Momen  to  Jerjretfj. 

1.  Since  1904  Women  are  admissible  to  the  Degrees  of  the 
University,  subject  to  such  regulations  as  the  Board  and  Senate 
may  impose. 

2.  They  are  admissible  to  all  Lectures  and  I^'xaminations,  and 
are  eligible  for  prizes  in  the  Schools  of  Arts,  Law,  Physic,  and 
Engineering. 

3.  In  the  Scliool  of  Physic  they  practise  dissections  separately 
from  Men ,  and  are  not  allowed  to  begin  the  study  of  Anatomy  or 
Physiology,  or  to  attend  hospitals,  unul  they  have  reached  the 
age  of  eighteen  years.  For  other  medical  lectures,  the  Professors 
make  such  arrangements  in  regard  to  Women  as  they  think  fit, 
subject  to  the  approval  of  the  Board. 

4.  Women  pay  the  same  fees  as  Men,  in  Arts,  and  in  the 
Professional  Schools. 

5.  They  are  not  eligible  for  Fellowship  or  for  Foundation 
Scholarships,  but  non-Foundation  Scholarships  are  open  to  them. 


4.  DisciPLiNAKr  Regulations  for  Womkn  Students. 

As  Women  Students  are  now  equally  admissible  with  Men 
Students  to  Lectures,  Examinations,  and  to  the  privilege  of 
reading  in  the  Library,  they  are  equally  subject  to  the  College 
Discipline  and  Statutes ;  and,  in  particular,  they  are  required  to 
observe  the  following  regulations  : — 

1.  All  Women  candidates  for  matriculation  shall  communicate 
with  the  Lady  Registrar  a  week  before  the  date  of  the  Entrance 
Examination,  and  shall  furnish  her  with  satisfactory  evidence  of 
character. 

2.  Women  Students  shall  inform  the  Lady  Registrar  at  least 
a  week  before  Lectures  begin  whether  they  propose  to  attend 
Lectures  or  not. 

3.  Women  Students  attending  Lectures  must  reside  either 
with  their  parents  or  guardians  in  town,  or  in  Trinity  Hall, 
unless  by  special  leave  from  the  Provost.  Forms  of  application 
for  the  Provost's  leave  can  be  obtained  from  the  Lady  Registrar. 

4.  Rooms  have  been  set  apart  in  Nos.  5  and  6,  Trinity  College, 
for  the  use  of  Women  Students.     Their  Examination  Marks  will 


DISCIPLINAKY   KEGtiLATTONS   FOR   WOMEN    SITDENTS.  (  I 

be  posted  in  these  room.s.     Women  students  are  not  admitted  to 

the  Assistant  llegistnir's  Office  except  in  special  circumstances. 

5.  Except  wlieu  enterinj^  or  leaving  College,  Women  Students 
shall  wear  their  Academicals  in  the  College  Squares  and  Parks, 
unless  accompanied  by  a  chaperon. 

6.  Women  Students  are  required  to  leave  tlie  College  Precincts 
at  6  P.M. 

7.  Women  Students  shall  not  visit  private  rooms  in  C<dlege 
unless  accorapaiiied  by  a  chaperon,  or  with  the  Provost's  sanction 
in  exceptional  circumstances. 

8.  Tliose  desiring  private  tuition  will  notify  the  Lady  Registrar, 
who  will  arrange  for  it  in  rooms  to  be  sanctioned  by  the  Provost. 

All  general  information  as  to  Lectures,  Examinations,  and 
the  Special  Regulations  for  Women  Students  may  be  obtained 
from  the  Lady  Registrar  as  well  as  from  the  Tutors.  Her  office, 
No.  5  Trinity  College,  is  open  daily  during  term.  She  will  be 
responsible  to  the  College  for  the  due  carrying  out  of  the  Regula- 
tions, and  will  act  generally  as  adviser  to  the  Women  Students. 


TRINITY  HALL. 

RkSIDKNCK    FOIl   WOMKN    STUDENTS. 

In  the  year  1908  the  house  and  grounds,  now  known  as  Trinity 
Hall,  were  acquired  by  the  University,  and  established  as  the 
official  residence  for  those  Women  Students  who  do  not  reside 
witli  their  parents  or  guardians.  The  adjoining  house  and 
grounds  were  purchased  in  1910  by  John  Purser  (Jriffith,  m.i.c.k., 
and  Mrs.  GrilHtli,  and  presented  to  the  University,  in  memory  of 
Frederick  Purser,  m.a.,  f.t.c.d.  In  the  grounds,  which  are  about 
10  acres  in  extent,  the  Dublin  University  Ladies'  Hockey  and 
Tennis  Clubs  have  their  held  and  courts;  and  Trinity  Hall  thus 
serves  as  one  of  the  centres  for  the  use  of  all  Women  Students, 
whether  resident  or  non-resident. 

Trinity  Hall  has  direct  tramway  connexion  with  Trinity 
College  either  by  the  Palmerston  Park  or  by  the  Dartry  Road 
line. 

Fees  for  tlie  term  of  ten  weeks  for  full  board  and  residence, 
with  a  study  bedroom,  are  from  £2.}  lOs.  to  £2*^  lOs.,  according 
to  the  size  of  the  room.  There  are  a  few  double  rooms,  for  which 
each  of  the  joint-owners  pays  £23  10s.,  Personal  expenses,  such 
as  laundry,  are  not  included  in  these  fees. 

Further  particulars  may  be  obtained  from  the  Warden,  Miss 
Cunningham,  m,a.,  Trinity  Hall,  Dartry  Road. 


(     78     ) 

JlDmt.sfitou  of  %im]'n  S^olarfi  (mm  wwh  ioamm) 
from  l|).e  i^jl^xnd)  of  Jrelmi^  irniuiui]  Colkijt, 
^ilkri;  IP  luxe. 

The  present  Regulations  are  as  follows : — 

1.  King's  Scholars,  upon  admission  to  the  Training  College 
and  payment  to  the  Junior  Bursar  of  Trinity  College  of  their 
first  half-yearly  fee  (£10  10s.),  are  recognized  as  "non-matricu- 
lated students  "  of  Trinity  College,  and  are  entitled  to  attend 
Freshman  lectures  ;  but  they  do  not  rank  as  fully  matriculated 
students  proceeding  to  degrees  unless  and  until  tliey  satisfy  the 
conditions  specified  below.  They  are  subject  to  the  usual 
College  discipline. 

2.  The  Training  College  pays  to  Trinity  College  four  half- 
yearly  fees  of  £10  10s.  each  for  all  King's  Scholars  during  the 
two  years  of  their  course. 

3.  During  their  course  King's  Scholars  attend  lectures  at 
Trinity  College  in  English  History,  Geography,  Literature  and 
Composition,  Algebra  and  Geometry,  and  i)i  the  Theory  of 
Education.  In  addition,  during  their  first  year  tliey  attend 
lectures  at  Trinity  College  in  English  Grammar,  Arithmetic, 
Physics  and  Chemistry  or  Irish ;  and  during  their  second  year 
in  Logic,  and  in  Natural  Science  or  Irish. 

4.  Their  progress  is  tested  by  an  examination  (to  be  approved 
by  the  Commissioners  of  National  Education)  held  at  the  close  of 
each  academic  year,  the  examination  at  the  end  of  the  second 
year  being  of  the  same  standard  as  that  of  the  Final  Freshman 
examination,  in  the  corresponding  subjects. 

5.  King's  Scholars  attend  lectures,  and  pass  the  requisite 
examinations  in  the  remaining  subjects  of  their  programme 
(including  Religious  Knowledge  and  the  Art  of  Teaching)  at  the 
Training  College,  and  are  tested  in  these  subjects  (as  well  as  in 
the  Theory  of  Education)  by  the  Inspector  of  the  Board  of 
National  Education. 

6.  King's  Scholars  who  pass  the  tests  indicated  in  Nos.  4  and  5 
are  provisionally  recognized  as  National  Teachers  by  the  Board 
of  National  Education  When  they  have  finished  their  proba- 
tionary period  of  teaching  and  have  obtained  their  diploma  from 
the  Board  of  National  Education,  they  are  awarded  ihe  diploma 
in  Elementary  Education  of  Trinity  College,  Dublin. 

7.  Such  King's  Scholars  as  wish  to  obtain  the  15. A.  Degree  of 
the  University  may  at  any  time  after  the  conclusion  of  their  two 
years'  course  of  training  put  their  names  on  the  College  books  as 
matriculated  students  of  Junior  Sophister  standing  by  passing  a 
Final  Freshman  examination  in  Languages  and  paying  the 
Entrance  Fee  of  £15.  They  will  qualify  for  degree  by  per- 
forming the  regular  exercises  and  paying  the  fees  of  the  two 
Sophister  years. 


(     79     ) 


1.  Admission  of  Students  from  the  Universities  of  Oxford 
and  Cambridge. 

Studknts  in  Arts,  of  the  Universities  of  Oxford  and  Cambridge, 
desiring  to  become  Members  of  the  University  of  Dublin,  will  be 
allowed  credit  for  their  previous  Academic  attendance,  according 
to  the  following  rules  :  — 

1.  Students  in  Arts  who  have  kept,  by  residence,  two  Terras 
at  Oxford,  and  have  passed  Responsions,  in  "  Stuted  Subjects," 
will  be  entitled  to  be  placed  in  the  Senior  Freshman  Class. 

The  same  standing  will  be  allowed  to  Cambridge  Students  who 
have  kept,  by  residence,  two  Terms,  and  have  passed  the  Previous 
Examination. 

2.  Students  in  Arts  who  have  kept,  by  residence,  four  Terms  at 
Oxford,  and  have  passed  the  First  Public  Examination,  will 
be  entitled  to  be  placed  in  the  Junior  Sophister  Class,  provided 
they  qualify  or  have  qualified  in  all  the  subjects  of  the  Final 
Freshman  Examination. 

The  same  standing  will  be  allowed  to  Cambridge  Students  who 
have  kept,  by  residence,  four  Terms,  and  passed  the  Previous 
Examination. 

3.  Oxford  Students  who  have  kept,  by  residence,  six  Terms, 
and  have  passed  the  First  Public  Examination,  will  be  entitled 
to  be  placed  in  the  Senior  Sophister  Class,  provided  they  qualify 
or  have  qualified  in  all  the  subjects  of  the  Final  Freshman 
Examination. 

The  same  standing  will  be  allowed  to  Cambridge  Students  who 
have  kept  six  Terras,  and  passed  both  parts  of  the  General 
Exaraination. 

4.  Students  in  Arts  who  have  kept,  by  residence,  nine  Terras 
at  Oxford,  and  have  passed  the  First  Public  Examination,  will 
be  admitted  to  the  Examination  for  the  Degree  of  B.A.,  provided 
tliey  qualify  or  have  qualified  in  all  the  subjects  of  the  Final 
Freshman  Kxamination. 

The  same  privilege  will  be  allowed  to  Students  who  have  kept 
nine  Terras  at  Cambridge,  and  have  passed  both  parts  of  the 
General  Examination. 

5.  Students  from  Oxford  or  Cambridge  desiring  to  be  placed  on 
the  Books  of  Trinity  College,  Dublin,  must  produce,  in  addition 
to  their  Certificate  of  the  Terms  kept  by  residence,  a  Certificate 
of  good  conduct,  signed  by  the  Head  of  their  College  or  Hall,-  or 
by  the  Censor  of  Non-Collegiate  Students. 


"^b     KECOGNITION   OF   COtTRSKS   KEPT   IN    OTHER   TTNIYERSITIES. 

Recognition  of  Courses  kept  in  other  Universities. 

(Resolutions  passed  by  the  Board  and  Council.) 

1.  That  no  Stiideuts  or  Graduates  of  any  other  Universitj- 
(excluding  Oxford  and  Cambridge)  should  be  allowed  to  take  the 
B.  A.,  unless  they  have  kept  at  least  two  Academic  years  at  T.C.D. 

2.  That  no  Student  should  be  allowed  to  take  any  of  the  Degrees 
in  Medicine,  Surgery,  and  Midwifery,  unless  he  has  attended  at 
least  three  years  of  the  prescribed  curriculum  in  the  School  of 
Physic,  Trinity  College. 

3.  That  any  Student  who  is  a  Bachelor  or  Master  of  Arts  or  a 
Bachelor  of  Science  of  a  University  recognized  by  the  Board  and 
Council  may  be  allowed  credit  for  the  two  Freshman  years  and  the 
Final  Freshman  Examination ;  and  that  such  Student  should  be 
allowed  to  have  his  name  placed  on  the  College  books  as  a  rising 
Junior  Sophister,  upon  payment  of  the  final  fee  of  the  Senior 
Freshman  year. 

If  it  should  appear  that  any  such  Student  has  not  studied,  as 
part  of  the  approved  Courses  in  the  University  at  which  he  has 
graduated,  any  of  the  compulsory  subjects  for  the  F'inal  Freshman 
Examination,  tiien  the  Senior  Lecturer  shall,  except  by  special 
permission  of  the  Board,  require  such  Student  to  pass  a  qualifying 
examination  in  such  subjects. 

4.  That  the  following  Universities  should  be  recognized  under 
the  foregoing  rule,  viz. : — the  Universities  of  Aberdeen,  Belfast, 
Birmingham,  Bristol,  Edinburgh,  Glasgow,  Leeds,  Liverpool, 
London,  Manchester,  St.  Andrews,  Sheffield,  Wales,  the  Royal 
University  of  Ireland,  and  the  National  University  of  Ireland. 

3.  Arrangements  with  Magee  College,  Londonderry. 

Provisional  arrangements,  made  in  reply  to  an  application  from 
Magee  College,  passed  the  15oard  and  Council  on  June  9,  ]'j09, 
and  were  accepted  by  Magee  College,  on  June  30,  1909.  They 
were  to  be  reconsidered  at  the  end  of  live  years,  or  sooner  by 
consent  of  both  parties. 

They  were  reconsidered  bj'  the  Board  and  Council  on  July  4, 
1910,  and  are  now  as  follows  :  — 

1.  On  vhe  completion  of  the  two  years'  Course  in  Magee 
College  in  April,  a  Student  of  Magee  College  becomes  eligible  for 
the  Final  Freshman  Examination  in  Trinity  College  in  the 
following  October,  or  in  June,  on  payment  of  the  October  Fees 
by  anticipation.  On  passing  that  Examination  he  may  return 
to  Magee  for  the  third  year's  Course  there  ;  and  after  attending 
a  Term  of  Lectures,  and  passing  an  Examination  at  the  end  of  it, 
in  the  Junior  Sophister  Course  of  Trinity,  will  be  credited  with  a 
Junior  Sophister  Term,  and,  on  attending  the  Trinity  Term  of 
Lectures  in  Trinity  College,  will  be  credited  with  the  Junior 
Sophister  year. 


ARUANGEMENTS  WITH    MAGEE   COLLEGE.  81 

2.  A  Student  who  wishes  to  postpone  his  Final  Freshman 
Examination  till  the  Supplemental  Final  Freshman  Examination, 
after  the  completion  of  the  tlnrd  year's  Course  at  Magee,  will  be 
allowed  provisional  credit  for  a  Junior  Sophister  Term  in  Trinity, 
on  attending  the  Lectures,  and  passing  the  Examination  of  the 
third  year's  Course  fn  Magee,  as  in  par.  1.  The  Term  thus  saved 
will  be  credited  as  a  Junior  Sophister  Examination,  when  the 
Student  shall  have  passed  the  Supplemental  Final  Freshman 
Examination,  and  full  credit  will  be  given  for  the  Junior  Sophister 
year  on  the  same  conditions  as  in  par.  1. 

3.  The  Senior  Sophister  year  will  be  kept  in  Trinity  College  by 
keeping  the  Michaelmas  or  Hilary  Term  of  Lectuies  in  Trinity 
College. 

Students  attending  Divinity  Lectures  in  connexion  witli  the 
Presbyterian  Church  during  the  Michaelmas  and  Hilary  Terms  of 
the  Senior  Sophister  year  may  obtain  credit  for  a  Senior  Sophister 
Term  by  keeping  the  Lectures  of  Trinity  Term  in  Trinity  College. 

4.  The  Degree  Examination  may  be  taken  by  any  Moderator- 
ship,  or  by  the  ordinary  Examination  in  December,  or,  in  special 
cases,  at  the  Degree  Examinations  in  June. 

4.  Recognition  of  Arts  Studies  of  certain  Colonial  and 
Indian  Universities  and  Colleges. 

The  University  of  Dublin  is  prepared  to  recognize  the  Arts 
studies  of  the  following  Colonial  and  Indian  Universities,  and  such 
others  as  the  Board  and  Council  may  from  time  to  time  direct  to 
be  added  to  that  list :  — 

The  Universities  of  Adelaide,  Allahabad,  Bombay,  Calcutta, 
Dacca,  M'Gill  (Montreal),  Madras,  Melbourne,  New  Brunswick, 
New  Zealand,  Patna,  The  Punjab,  Sydney,  Tasmania,  Toronto, 
King's  College,  Windsor,  Nova  Scotia. 

The  privileges  in  Arts  granted  to  the  Students  of  sach 
Universities  are  as  follows : — 

Any  Student  producing  the  proper  Certificates  that  be  has 
passed  two  years  in  Arts  studies  at  such  Universities  or  Colleges, 
and  has  passed  the  Examinations  belonging  to  that  period,  will 
be  entitled  to  put  his  name  on  the  College  books  as  a  Senior 
Freshman,  or  Student  with  one  year's  credit ;  with  this  reserva- 
tion, that  if  it  shall  appear  that  the  Course  of  Arts  which 
he  has  pursued  does  not  include  all  the  subjects  of  the  Junior 
Freshman  year,  the  Senior  Lecturer  may  require  him  to  qualify 
by  Examination  in  the  omitted  subject  or  subjects  within  ono 
month  after  his  name  shall  have  been  entered  on  the  books. 

To  such  Students  the  Entrance  Fee,  and  the  May  half-yearly 
Fee  of  the  Junior  Freshman  year,  are  remitted. 

K  3 


82  SOUTH   AFKICAN    STUDENTS. 

Terms  of  Admission  for  South  African  Students. 
A. 

Medical  Students. 

1.  Students  are  classified  under  the  following  categories  : — 

(«)  Those  who,  at  Matriculation  in  a  South  African  University, 
have  passed  in  Latin,  English,  Arithmetic,  Algebra,  Geometrj', 
and  one  of  the  following  languages: — French,  German,  Greek, 
Italian,  Dutch. 

[b)  Those  who  in  addition  have  obtained  credit  for  attendance 
for  one  year  in  Botany,  Zoology,  Chemistry,  and  Pliysics, 
including  practical  work. 

(c)  Those  who  have  passed  the  first  B.Sc.  (Agriculture) 
Examination  in  these  subjects. 

{d)  Those  with  the  qualification  (c)  who  have  taken  six  months 
Anatomy  Lectures  and  dissections  at  the  University  of  Cape 
Town,  or  at  the  University  of  Witwatersrand. 

(e)  Those  with  the  qualification  (f)  who  have  credit  for 
attendance  on  the  full  courses  of  Anatomy  and  Physiology 
(including  practical  work)  at  the  University  of  Cape  Town,  or  at 
the  University  of  Witwatersrand. 

(/)  Those  with  the  qualification  (c)  who  have  also  the 
qualification  mentioned  below  in  B  2. 

2.  Students  belonging  to  these  classes  will  be  admitted  to  the 
Medical  School  as  follows  : — 

(rt)  may  enter  without  examination. 

(6)  may  present  themselves  for  the  Preliminary  Scientific 
Examination,  and  proceed  as  Second  Year  Students. 

(c)  are  excused  the  Preliminary  Scientific  Examination. 
Those  partially  qualified  for  this  class  are  excused  the  subjects  in 
which  they  have  passed  at  the  B.Sc.  (Agriculture). 

{d)  are  given  credit  for  the  first  year  Anatomy  Course. 

(e)  and  (/)  may  present  themselves  for  the  Intermediate 
Medical  Examination,  Part  I,  and  proceed  as  Third  Year 
Students.  If  they  have  not  taken  a  Course  in  Organic  Chemistry, 
they  may  omit  this  subject  at  the  Examination,  and  take  it  in 
their  third  year. 

Courses  in  Physiology  at  the  Universities  of  Stellenbosch  or 
South  Africa  may,  at  the  discretion  of  the  School  of  Physic, 
be  recognized  as  giving  exemption  from  the  corresponding 
course  in  Physiology  in  the  School  of  Physic.  See  also  "  Schools 
recognized  by  Trinity  College." 


SODtK   AFHICAN   STtTDENTS.  63 

3.  Arts  standing  will  be  thus  determined : — 

{(i)  enter  as  Junior  Freshmen,  and  are  excused  the  Entrance 
Fee. 

(b),  (c),  and  {(/)  enter  as  Senior  Freshmen,  and  are  excused  in 
addition  the  first  half-yearly  Arts  fee.  They  are  thus  liable  for 
two  half-yearly  fees  l)efore  taking  their  Senior  Freshmen  Arts 
Lectures  in  Trinity  Term. 

(e)  join  as  Senior  Freshmen,  but  pay  one  half-yearly  fee  less 
than  those  in  Classes  (6),  (c),  (d) :  provided  always  that  if  they 
join  in  October,  and  wisli  to  hold  Chambers  in  College  during 
the  winter,  they  must  pay  the  same  fees  as  {b),  (c),  and  (d). 

(/)  are  exempted  from  attendance  on  the  Senior  Freshman 
Trinity  Terra  lectures,  and  may  compete  at  the  Final  Freshman 
Examination  in  June  or  October  on  paying  the  May  Senior 
Freshman  Fee.  If  successful,  they  i)ay  the  Final  Senior  Freshman 
Fee  before  November,  and  proceed  as  Junior  Sophisters. 

4.  Final  Freshman  Examination. 

(i)  South  African  students  may  present  Dutch  as  their 
language. 

(2)  Thdse  who  have  passed  in  Physics  at  the  B.Sc.  (Agriculture) 
Examination  are  exempted  from  Mechanics. 

(3)  Class  (/)  are  exempted  from  any  subject  in  which  they 
have  passed  an  extimination  as  specified  in  B  'J. 

B. 

Sludenta  other  than  Medical  Students. 

1.  Students  with  the  qualification  A.  1.  [a)  are  admitted  to 
Trinity  College  without  examination,  but  must  pay  the  Entrance 
Fee. 

2.  Students  who  have  attended  the  full  courses  of  the  First 
Year  in  Arts  of  any  University  in  South  Africa,  and  have  passed 
the  corresponding  examinations,  may  start  as  Senior  Freshmen 
with  credit  up  to  the  April  of  the  Senior  Freshman  Year.  They 
will  attend  Trinity  Term  lectures,  and  must  pass  the  Final 
Freshman  Examination  in  all  subjects  not  included  in  their 
Course.  They  are  excused  the  Entrance  Fee  and  two  half-yearly 
fees. 

3.  A  Student  who  has  passed  the  B.A.  Examination  of  any 
University  in  South  Africa,  is  permitted  to  put  his  name  on  the 
Books  of  Trinity  College  as  a  rising  Junior  Sophister,  i.e.,  as  a 
student  who  lias  obtained  credit  for  the  first  two  Collegiate  years 
and  for  the  Final  Freshman  Examination. 

To  such  students  the  Entrance  and  half-yearly  fees  up  to  and 
including  that  payable  in  May  of  the  Senior  Freshman  year  are 
remitted. 


84  SOUTH   AKiaCAN   STUDENTS. 

4.  Any  Student  wlio  is  a  Bachelor  of  Science  of  any  South 
African  University  is  allowed  credit  for  the  two  Freshman  years 
and  the  Final  Kreslinian  Examination,  and  such  student  is 
allowed  to  have  his  name  placed  on  the  College  hooks  as  a  rising 
Junior  Sophister  xxpon  payment  of  the  final  fee  of  the  Senior 
Fresliman  year. 

If  it  sliould  appear  that  any  such  student  has  not  studied,  as 
part  of  the  approved  courses  in  the  University  at  which  he  has 
graduated,  any  of  the  compulsory  subjects  of  the  Final  Fresliman 
Examination,  then  the  Senior  Lecturer  sliall  require  such  student 
to  pass  a  qualifying  examination  in  sucli  subjects,  unless  he  is 
exempted  by  special  permission  of  the  Board. 

5.  Students  from  South  Africa  may  substitute  Dutch  for  Greek, 
French,  German,  or  Italian  at  any  Pass  Kxamination  in  Arts. 


EXHIBITIONS  AWARDED  TO  STUDENTS  FROM 
SOUTH  AFRICA. 

The  following  scheme  for  awarding  South  African  Exhibitions 
was  adopted  by  the  Board,  for  the  year  1923. 

1.  The  distribution  of  the  South  African  Exhibitions  shall  be  as 
follows : — 

(a)  Three  to  be  nominated  by  the  University  of  Stellenboach. 

(i)   Three  to  be  nominated  by  the  University  of  South  Africa. 

2.  The  nomination  by  each  University  shall  be  made  before  March  1st 
m  each  year.  The  Exhibitioner  should  join  Trinity  College  before 
April  15th. 

3.  The  Exhibitions  shall  be  granted  to  Medical  Students  only  (unless 
the  Board  of  Trinity  College  shall  in  a  special  case  determine  other- 
wise). 

4.  Exhibitioners  appointed  in  any  year  must  have  joined  the  Medical 
School  earlier  than  October  of  the  previous  year. 

5.  Exhibitioners  will  be  expected  to  take  the  Degree  of  M.D.  (unless 
specially  exempted),  and  in  the  matter  of  hospital  attendance  and  other- 
wise to  comply  with  the  directions  given  by  the  authorities  of  Trinity 
College- 

6.  The  value  of  these  Exhibitions  shall  be  £150  if  three  years  of  the 
Medical  Education  are  taken  in  Trinity  College,  £175  if  four  years,  and 
£200  if  the  whole  Medical  Course  is  taken  in  Trinity  College. 

7.  The  first  payment  of  an  Exliibition  is  made  at  the  end  of  tlie  first 
quarter  after  the  Exhibitioner  has  joined  Trinity  College. 

8.  No  person  shall  be  disqualified  for  nomination  to  an  Exhibition 
by  reason  of  his  holding  any  Exhibition  or  Scholarship  in  South 
Africa. 


SODTH   AFRICAN   STUDKKTS.  85 


Exhibition  awarded  to  Graduates  in  Medicine  of 
Melbourne  University. 

Uv  order  of  the  lioard  of  Trinity  College,  Dublin  (dated 
20th  April,  191 S),  the  University  of  Melbourne  is  entitled  to 
nominate  one  of  its  medical  graduates  to  an  exhibition  of  £100, 
with  rooms,  rent  free  for  six  months,  in  Trinity  College,  intended 
to  defray,  in  part,  the  expenses  incurred  in  obtaining  the  Diploma 
in  Gynaecology  and  Obstetrics  granted  by  the  University  of 
Dublin.  This' regulation  will  hold  for  one  such  graduate  in  each 
of  the  five  years  beginning  October,  1918. 

The  Regulations  for  the  Diploma  and  the  fees  payable  in  con- 
nexion with  it  are  given,  under  that  heading. 

During,  or  at  the  end  of,  his  course  of  instruction  the  exhi- 
bitioner is  eligible  for  election  to  the  post  of  External  Maternity 
Assistant  at  the  Hotunda  Hospital,  and,  at  the  end  of  his  course, 
for  the  post  i>f  Assistant  Master. 


(,    86    ) 


§onox  (^oxxxun, 

STCDENTs  mar  become  Candidates  for  Honors  in  the  follow- 
ing subjects,  at  each  Term  Examination  in  the  Undergraduate 
Course : — 

Junior  Freshmen,  .  Mathematics;  Classics;  Experimental  Science; 
History  ;  English  Literature  ;  French  ; 
German  ;  Italian  ;   Spanish. 

Senior  Freshmen,  .  Mathematics  ;  Classics  ;  Mental  and  Moral 
Philosophy;  Experinienial  Science;  His- 
tory ;  English  Literature ;  French  ;  German ; 
Italian ;  Spanish. 

Junior  Sophisters,  .  Mathematics ;  Classics ;  Mental  and  Moral 
Philosophy;  Experimental  Science;  Natural 
Science  ;  History  and  Political  Science  ; 
Modern  Literature ;  Legal  and  Political 
Science. 

Senior  Sophisters,  .  Mathematics ;  Classics ;  Mental  and  Moral 
Philosophy;  Experimental  Science;  Natural 
Science ;  Legal  and  Political  Science. 

A  Prize  Examination  is  held  in  Mental  and  Moral  Philosophy 
in  the  Michaelmas  Term  of  the  .Junior  Freshman  year;  Prize 
Examinations  are  also  held  in  Natural  Science,  and  in  Old  and 
Middle  Irish  in  the  Michaelmas  Term  of  the  Senior  and  Junior 
Freshman  years ;  and  a  Prize  Examination  in  Celtic  Languages 
in  the  Michaelmas  Term  of  the  Junior  Sophister  year. 

At  the  B.  A.  Degree  Examination,  Students  may  graduate  in 
Honors  in  eleven  subjects,  viz. : — 
Mathematics. 
Classics. 

Mental  and  Moral  Philosophy. 
Experimental  Science. 
Natural  Science. 
History  and  Political  Science. 
Modern  Literature. 
Legal  and  Political  Science. 
Engineering  Science. 
Celtic  Languages. 
Oriental  Languages. 

The  regulations  by  which  the  rank  and  value  of  the  various 
Honors  and  Prizes  are  determined  have  been  already  given  (see 
above,  under  the  head  "  Honors  and  Prizes"). 

For  Privileges  and  Exemptions  granted  to  Honor  Students,  see 
Course  in  Arts,  §  16. 


HONOA  C0UE8E  IN   MATHEMATICS.  87 


§  I. — Mathematics. 

[The  books  lecomniended  by  the  Mathematical  Committee  are  printed 
on  a  separate  leaflet. 

Credit  will  be  given  for  style  ami  neat  arrangement  of  answers. 

Candidates  are  expected  to  bring  into  the  hall  i)Ooks  of  tables  and 
Mmheniatical  inslriiinents.  Questions  of  a  practical  nature  will  be  set 
at  each  examination  in  the  Freshman  year. 

In  every  term  questions  may  be  set  in  any  portion  of  the  preceding 
Honor  Course.] 

JITNIOK  FEESHMEN. 
MlCHAKLMAS  LECTURES  AND   HiLAllY   EXAMINATION. 

Geometry  :  Plane. — Elementaiy  pure  geometry  of  the  straight  line  and 
circle,  including  the  elementary  theory  of  maxima  and  minima  ;  mean 
centre;  harmonic  section  ;  inversion;  coaxal  circles ;  poles  and  polars. 
Aiuilytical  geometry  of  tlie  straight  line  ;  loci;  Soliil. — Tlie  plane  and 
straight  line ;  elementary  geometry  and  mensuration  of  the  simple 
solids. 

Algebra. — The  remainder  theorem;  tlieory  of  quadratic  equations; 
simple  inequalities;  progressions,  including  the  summation  and  con- 
vergence of  infinite  geometric  and  allied  series ;  permutations  and 
combinations,  with  applications  to  simple  questions  in  probability ; 
binomial  theorem  for  a  positive  integral  exponent ;  determinant 
notation. 

Trigouometry. — Trigonometrical  identities  ;  properties  of  triangles 
and  their  inscribed,  escribed,  and  circumscribed  circles ;  numerical 
solution  of  triangles  with  logarithms ;  problems  on  heights  and 
distaJices  in  two  or  three  dimensions. 


Hilary  Lectures  and  Trinity  Examinations. 

Geometry. — Elementary  pure  geometry  of  the  conies ;  reciprocation, 
cross  ratio,  and  involution  ;  general  equation  of  the  circle  in  Cartesian 
coordinates ;  properties  of  conies  deduced  from  their  Cartesian  equa- 
tions in  their  simplest  forms  ;  theory  of  the  circular  points  at  infinity. 

Algebra. — Rational,  irrational,  and  complex  numbers  ;  partial 
fractions  ;  limits  ;  elementary  treatment  of  the  convergence  of  series  ; 
multiplication  of  two  absolutely  convergent  series  of  real  terms ; 
exponential,  binomial,  and  logarithmic  series  for  real  variables. 

Trigonometry. — De  Moivre's  tlieorem  ;  expression  of  the  sine  and 
cosine  functions  by  infinite  series  ;  summation  of  finite  trigonometrical 
series. 


88  HONOR  COUKSIO   IN  MATHEMATICS. 


Tkinity  Li:ctuues  and  Michaelmas  Examination. 

Plane  Geometry. — Discussion  of  thu  general  equation  of  the  second 
degree  in  rectangular  coordinates  ;  confocul  conies. 

Algebra. — Transformation  of  equations  ;  Horner's  method  ;  calcula- 
tion of  symmetric  functions  of  tlie  mots  of  an  <  quation. 

Spherical  I'rigonometry. —  Formulae  for  cos  a  and  cos  A  ;  rules  of 
sines  ;  formula;  for  right-angled  triangles  ;  spherical  areas. 

Cnlculus. — Variables,  functions,  limits,  conlinuity  ;  the  differential 
coefficient  and  its  properties;  ditfereniial  calculus,  including  Taylor's 
theorem  for  one  variable. 

Elementary  Mechanics. — Laws  of  motion  ;  composition  ajid  resolution 
of  velocities,  accelerations  and  force* ;  equilibrium  under  coplanar 
forces ;  friction ;  simple  applications  of  graphic  methods ;  simple 
machines ;   work  and  energy. 


Senioh  Fkeshmen. 

Michaelmas  Lkctuues  Axn  Hilary  Examination. 

Geometry:  Plane. — Further  theory  of  conies;  Solid. — Analytical 
geometry  of  the  straight  line  and  plane. 

Algebra. — Tlieoiy  of  determinants,  matrii  es  and  systems  of  linear 
equations. 

Calculus. — Vartial  derivatives ;  implicit  functions ;  change  of  variable ; 
maxima  and  minima ;  elementary  application  of  the  calculus  to  plane 
curves ;  calculation  of  indefinite  integrals  and  reduction  to  standard 
forms. 

Statics. — Equilibrium  under  coplanar  forces,  excluding  friction ; 
virtual  work. 

Dynamics. — Rectilinear  motion  of  a  particle ;  harmonic  motion  ; 
projectiles  ;  constrained  uniplanar  motion  under  gravity. 

Hilary  Lectuues  and  Tkinity  Examination. 

Geometry. — Properties  common  to  surfaces  of  the  second  degree. 

Calculus. — Taylor's  theorem  for  several  variables;  interpretation  of 
integration  as  summation  ;  calculation  of  definite  integrals;  applications 
to  areas,  lengths,  and  volumes ;  further  application  of  the  calculus  to 
plane  curves.     Fuler's  theorems  on  liomogeneous  functions. 

Statics. — Equilibrium  of  bodies  under  coplanar  forces,  including  the 
general  theory  of  friction  ;  graphic  statics. 

Dynamics. — Motion  of  a  particle  under  a  central  force. 


Ho^ox  cotmsE  nf  hathematics*  89 


Trinity  Lectuues  and  Michaki.mas  Exx^^l^■\•n^•x. 

Geometrij. —Cariesiim  eqiuilior.s  of  the  qiiiidiics  in  tlieir  simplest 
form. 

Algebra. — Algebraic  solution  of  the  cubic  and  quartie  ;  Sturm's 
theorem. 

Calculus. — Continuity,  differentiation,  and  integriition  of  functions 
defined  by  definite  integrals  ;  multiple  integrals,  with  applications  to 
areas,  volumes,  centres  of  gravity,  and  moments  of  inertia. 

Differential  i'quatiotis. —  Slandnrd  forms  of  differential  equations  of 
the  first  order. 

Dynamics. — Constrained  motion  of  a  particle  ;  motion  of  a  particle  in 
a  resisting  medium. 

Attractions. — Elementary  theory  of  attraction  and  potential  for 
particles;  uniform  plane  and  spherical  distribution  of  matter;  tubes  of 
force. 

JUNIOE   SOPHISTEKS. 

MlCHAKLMVS    LeCTUKES   AND    HiLAKY    EXAMINATION. 

Geometry . —Redntiion  of  the  general  equation  of  the  second  degree 
in  rectangular  coordinates. 

Analysis. — A  revision  and  more  detailed  treatment  of  fundamental 
principles,  including  the  principle  of  convergence,  infinite  series,  an:i 
definite  integrals;  mean  value  theorems;  infinite  products;  series  of 
functions  and  unifonn  convergence  ;  the  notion  of  an  analytic  function 
of  a  complex  variable ;  discussion  ol  the  most  elementary  functions  of 
a  complex  variable;  conformal  reprcsentaticm. 

Differential  Equations. — Simple  equations  of  higher  order;  the  linear 
equation  with  constant  coefficients,  and  the  homogeneous  equation. 

Statics. — General  equations  of  equilibrium  in  three  dimensions  and 
reduction  to  Poinsot's  axis;  equilibrium  of  inextensible  strings  under 
gravity. 

Dynamics — General  principles,  energy,  momentum  ;  motion  of  a  rigid 
body  parallel  to  a  fixtd  plane. 

HlLAUY    LeCTUHKS    AND   TuiNITY    EXAMINATION. 

Geometry. — Homogeneous  and  tangential  coordinates  in  two  and 
three  dimensions. 

Analysis. — Analytic  functions  represented  by  power  series  ;  theory 
of  power  series  ;  the  exponential,  trigonometric,  logarithmic,  and 
binomial  functions  of  a  complex  variable. 

Differential  Equations. — Elementary  theory  of  the  linear  equation  of 
the  second  order  ;  integration  by  series  ;  simultaneous  linear  equations 
with  constant  coefficients. 

/ 


90  HOWOR  COORSE  IN   MATHEMATICS. 

Altraclions. — General  theory  of  potential ;  Green's  theorem  ;  elemen- 
tary applications  of  spherical  harmonics ;  inversion  and  images  ;  statical 
electricity.  (Attraction  oCqnadrics  and  iiniplanar  distributions  of  matter 
excluded.) 

Hi/drostatics. — Pressure  at  a  point;  resultant  pressure  over  areas; 
equilibrium  of  floating  bodies  wheii  the  fluid  is  at  rest  or  rotating  as  a 
rigid  body. 

[End  of  Scholarship  Course.] 


Trinity  Lectures  and  Michaelmas  Examination. 

Analysis. — Functional  determinants ;  general  theory  of  multiple 
integrals;  change  of  variables;  curvilinear  and  surface  integrals; 
Cauchy's  theorem;  Taylor's,  Laurent's,  and  Liouville's  theorems; 
calculation  of  definite  integrals  by  residues. 

Geometry. — Properties  of  twisted  curves  and  developables  ;  curvature 
and  torsion  ;  elementary  properties  of  the  twisted  cubic. 

Differential  Equations. — Total  differential  equations. 

Statics. — General  equations  of  equilibrium  of  strings,  including  elastic 
strings. 

Dynamics. — Motion  of  a  rigid  body  in  three  dimensions;  screws; 
Euler's  equations. 

Michaelmas  Lectures  and  Hilary  Examination. 

Analysis.  —Analytical  continuation  ;  zeros,  poles,  and  singularities  ; 
analytic  functions  representeii  by  infinite  series  and  improper  integriils  : 
application  of  Cauchy's  theorem  to  the  expansion  of  functions  in  infinite 
series  and  products  ;  Legendre  functions. 

Geometry. — Confocal  quadrics;  six  coordinates  of  the  straight  line  ; 
elementary  theory  of  the  singularites  of  algebraic  curves ;  elementary 
properties  of  the  plane  cubic. 

Dynamics. — Lagrange's  generalised  equations  of  motion;  small 
oscillations. 

Attractions. — Attractions  of  quadrics  and  of  uniplanar  distributions 
of  matter  ;  systems  of  conductors. 

Hilary  Lectures  and  Trinity  Examination. 

Analysis. — Stirling's  formula  for  «  !  ;  the  gamma  function ;  expression 
in  various  forms  of  r  (j)  and  of  tlie  remainder  in  Stirling's  formula  for 
log  r  (z) ;  expression  of  B  {m,  n)  in  terms  of  gamma  functions. 

Dirichiet's  integrals. 

Fourier's  series. 

Differential  Equations. — Theory  of  the  integrals  of  the  linear  equation 
of  the  second  order. 

Geometry. — General  theory  of  surfaces,  including  curvature,  in 
Cartesian  or  homogeneous  coordinates. 


HONOR  COURSR   IN    MATHEMATICS.  91 

Hifdrod!/namics.  —  Fm\(]iiuvi\Ui\  i.iopeity  of  a  fluid,  Eiiler's  and 
Lagrange's  forms  of  the  equations  of  motion,  Weber's  transformation  ; 
steady  motion  ;  velocity  potential,  Stokes'  theorem,  irrotational  motion 
in  simply  connected  and  multiply  connected  regions.  Green's  theorem; 
sources  and  sinks,  images ;  stream-function  in  two  dimensions  ;  motion 
of  a  circular  cylinder  in  an  infinite  liquid;  vessel  in  the  shape  of  an 
elliptic  or  equilateral  prism  rotating  uniformly  ;  elliptic  prism  moving 
with  uniform  motion  of  translation  and  rotution  ;  motion  of  a  sphere  in 
an  infinite  liquid  ;  Stokes'  stream-function  ;  vortex  motion,  expression 
of  velocities  in  terms  of  expansion  and  rotation,  velocity  potential  due 
to  a  vortex,  vortex  sheets  ;  rectilinear  vortices. 

Trinity  Lectures. 

Ariali/sis.—Th(i  elliptic  functions;  partial  di(ferei\tial  equations  of 
the  first  order. 

Geometry. — Differential  geometry  of  surfaces  in  Gaussian  coordinates, 
including  Gauss'  theorem  on  tlie  invariance  of  the  total  curvature  of  an 
inextensihle  surface. 

Algebra. — Invariants  and  covariants  of  binary  and  of  ternary  quad- 
ratic forms. 

Elasticittj. — Heterogeneous  strain,  heterogeneous  stress  ;  expressions 
of  stress  in  terms  of  strain,  strain-energy  function ;  forms  of  symmetry  ; 
equations  of  equilibrium  ;  spherical  shells  under  uniform  surface- 
tractions  ;  torsion  of  a  prism  when  the  cross-section  is  an  ellipse,  an 
equilateral  triangle,  or  a  rectangle  ;  equilibrium  of  thin  beams,  assuming 
the  bending-moniL'nt  proportional  to  the  curvature,  equation  of  three 
moments. 


§  II. — Classics. 

The  principle  on  which  the  Honor  Examinations  in  Classics  are 
conducted  is  to  test  the  proficiency  of  the  Student  on  the  following 
points  : — 

First.  As  to  his  minute  and  critical  knowledge  of  certain  defined 
portions  of  the  Greek  and  Latin  authors. 

Secondly.  As  to  his  general  and  independent  knowledge  of  the 
Greek  and  Latin  languages,  and  their  literature,  to  be  proved  by 
his  ability  to  write  an  accurate  version  of  passages  from  the 
prescribed  Honor  Course,  and  also  from  Classical  works  not 
prescribed  ;  as  well  as  to  answer,  in  writing,  general  (juestions 
connected  with  tlie  languages,  and  their  literature. 

Thirdly.  As  to  his  power  of  expressing  the  full  meaning  and 
force  of  an  ancient  author,  by  writing  such  a  translation  of  a  given 
passage  as  may  deserve  commendation,  not  merely  for  its  correct- 
ness as  a  version  of  the  original,  but  for  its  excellence  as  a  piece  of 
English  Composition. 

/ 


92 


HONOfi  COUUSE  m  CtA8StCS. 


With  these  objects  in  view,  the  manner  of  conducting  the 
Classical  Honor  Examinations  is  as  follows  : 

1.  Candidates  for  Honors  will  be  separately  examined,  viid  voce, 
in  the  portions  of  the  Honor  Course  marked  in  Italics  in  the 
following  Table. 

2.  Passages  will  be  proposed  for  written  translation,  taken  from 
the  works  of  the  Greek  and  Latin  writers  named  in  the  following 
Table:  — 

iUNIOU  FKESHMEN. 

f  Euripides: — Medea,  Bacchae ;  Hercules  Furens. 

1  Horace: — Odei>,  Epodes,  Carmen  Seculare. 

1  Ovid's  Heroides,  edited  by   Palmer   (Clarendon 

(_     Press),  I.— XIV.,  inclusive. 

[  Homer : — Odyssey,    Books    vr.    ix.  xxi.   xxii. ; 

)      Odyssey,  Books  x.-xvii.,  inclusive. 

J  Virgil,   JEneid,  Books   i.,   ir.,  iii.,  v.  ;  ^neid, 

I      Books  IV.,  VI.,  VII. 

I  Herodotus; — Books  i.  viii. ;  Books  vi.vn. 

<  Livy: — Books  xxi.   xxii.  xxm.;    Books  xxiv. 

(         XXV. 


Mich.  Lect.  and 

HiLAKV  EXAU. 


HiLAiiY  Lect.  and 
TuiNiTY  Exam. 


TuiNiTY  Lect.  and 
Mich.  Exam. 


senior  FllESHMEN. 

Plato: — Apologia  Socratis,  Gorgias ;  Phaedo. 
Cicero  : — Pro   Milone,    Thilippic  ii  ;    Cicero   in 
his  Letters  i.-xxxiii.  ;  Cicero  in  his  Letters, 
xxxiv.-Lxxx.    (Tyrreiis    Edition,    published 
by  Macmillan). 

-_  T  (Sophocles: — Ajax,  Antigone ;  Philoctetes. 

T*?J.!f'''^;tr        Plautus:_rm™»«,  Miles;  C«ptivi. 

'  Terence: — Phormio. 

("Homer: — Iliad,   Books    xxi.-xxiv.,    inclusive; 
,_  ^  I       Iliad,  Books  xiii.-xx.,  inclusive. 

T^r?"  ^1?;/''°  <  ^'ii'gil  -.—jEneid,  Books  iv.  vi.  viii.  ix.;  JEneid, 
I       Books  VII.  X.  XI.  XII. 
l^Ovid: — Metamorphoses,  Book  xni. 


Mich.  Lect.  and 
HiLAKV  Exa'm. 


Trinity  Exam. 


Mich.  Exam. 


.Mich.  Lect.  and 
Hilary  Exam. 


Hilary  Lect.  and 
Trinity  Exam. 


TitiNiTY  Lect.  and 
Mich.  Exam. 


JUNIOR  SOPHISTERS. 

Thucydides: — Books  i.  vii. ;  Books  iii.  iv. 
Tacitus :  —  Agricohi ;    Histories.     Books  i.    ii. 
Histories,  Books  ill.  it. 
f  Demosthenes  :  —  Olynthiacs,    Philippic    i.,    De 
I       Corona. 

^  Aeschines  : — In  Ctesiphontem. 
I  Juvenal: — 5rt</rcs i.  in.  iv.  vii.viii.  x.  xiii.  xiv. 
l^Persius: — Satires  i.  ii.  in.  t.  vi. 

!  Aeschylus: — Prometheus  Vinctus  ;   Agamemnon, 
Septem  contra  Thebas. 
Lucretius: — Books  i.  n. ;  Books  in.  v.  vi. 
Horace :  — Satires. 


HONOR   C0DU8K   IN   CLASSICS. 


93 


SKNIOR  80PHISTEK8. 

f  Aristotle: — Nicomachean   Ethics,    Books   ii.  vi.  ; 
Mich.  Lect.  and      !      Nicomachean  Ethics,  Books  i.  m.  iv.  v. 

Hilary  Exam.       \  Cicero:  — Be  Officiis;   De  Finibus.  Books  i.  ii. 
l^     III. ;  Tusculan  Disputations,  Book  i. 

f  Plato: — De  Republica,  Books  i.ii.iTi. ;  De  Rcpub- 
HiLAiiY  Lect.  and    I      lica,  Books  iv.  t. 
Trinity  Exam.      ]  Virgil : — Eclogues  and  Georgics. 

l_  Horace: — Epistles,  including  the  Art  of  Poetry. 

3.  One  or  more  passages  will  also  be  proposed  for  written  trans- 
lation from  the  other  works  of  Greek  or  Latin  Prose  or  Poetical 
authors  specified  for  each  Examination,  with  a  view  of  testing  the 
Candidate's  general  knowledge  of  the  languages. 

4.  Papers  of  questions  will  be  proposed  in  Ancient  History  and 
Geography,  Grammar,  and  General  Literature,  and  also  subjects 
for  Composition  in  Greek  and  Latin  Prose,  Greek  and  Latin  Verse. 

5.  During  the  first  three  years.  Candidates  for  Honors  will  be 
regularly  lectured  and  examined  in  definite  portions  of  Ancient 
History,  Literature,  or  Philology ;  and,  at  each  Examination,  the 
Candidates  will  be  liable  to  be  examined  in  the  portions  appointed 
for  the  previous  Examinations. 

The  following  Table  shows  the  prescribed  Courses  in  History 
and  Literature  until  further  notice  : — 


JUNIOR  FKESHMEN. 

Hilary  Examination. 

Greek,       .     Mahaffy's  Greek  Literature,  vol.  i., 
Roman,     .     Tyrrell's  Latin  Poetry,  chaps.  1  to  7 


.  14  to  17. 


Tkinity  Examination. 

Greek,       .     Mahaffy's  Greek  Literature,  vol.  i.,  chaps.  1  to  5. 

Bury's  History  of  Greece,  chaps.  1,  2. 
Soman,     .     Sellar's  Virgil,  chaps.  2,  3,  8  to  11. 

Michaelmas  Examination. 

Greek,       .     Mahaffy's  Greek  Literature,  vol.  ii.,  chaps.  1,  2. 

Bury's  History  of  Greece,  chaps.  3  to  8. 
Roman,     .     How  and  Leigh's  History  of  Home,  chaps.  17  to  30. 


SENIOK   FKGSHUKN. 

Hilary  Examination. 


Greek,       .     Bury's  History  of  Greece,  chaps.  9  to  11. 

Roman,     .     How  and  Leigh's  History  of  Rome,  chaps.  31  to  62. 


94 


HONOK  CODU»E   IN    CLASSICS. 


Thinity  Examination. 

Greek,       ■     Bury's  History  of  Greece,  chaps.  12  to  15. 
Roman,     .     How  and  Leigh's  History  of  Eome,  chaps.  1  to  17. 
Tyn-ell's  Latin  Poetry,  chaps.  1,  2. 

Michaelmas  Examination. 

Greek,       .     Bury's  History  of  Greece,  chaps.  1  to  8. 
Roman,     .     Bury's  Student's  Eoman  Empire,  chaps.  1  to  13. 

Merivale's  History  of  the   Romans   under  the    Empire, 
chapters  40  and  4 1. 

Tyrrell's  Latin  Poetry,  chap.  5. 

JPNIOE  SOPHISTERS. 


Greek, 
Roman, 


Greek, 
Roman, 


Greek, 


Hilary  Examination. 

Mahaffy's  Greek  Literature,  vol.  ii.,  chaps.  4,  5. 

Bury's  History  of  Greece,  chaps.  9  to  15. 

Bury's  Student's  Roman  Empire,  chaps.  14  to  2k 

Trinity  Examination. 

Bury's  History  of  Greece,  chaps.  16  to  18. 
Bury's  Student's  Roman  Empire,  chaps.  14  to  25. 
Tyrrell's  Latin  Poetry,  chaps.  7,  S. 

Michaelmas  Examination. 

Mahaffy's  Greek  Literature,  vol.  i.,  chaps.  15,  16. 
Haigh's  Attic  'I'heatre. 

Bury's  Student's  Roman  Empire,  chaps.  26  to  end. 
Tyrrell's  Latin  Poetry,  chaps.  1  to  8. 


$  III. — Mental  and  Moral  PHiLosoPHr. 

In  addition  to  questions  from  the  books  recommended,  candi- 
dates will  be  examined  in  their  general  knowledge  of  the  subject, 
period,  or  school  under  study. 

JUNIOE   FRESHMAN    YKAR. 

Trinity  Lectures  and  Michaelmas  Examination. 
Logic. 

Course  of  reading  recommended  : — 

Keynes'   Logic  (Fourth  Edition),   Introduction,  Part  i ;   Part  ii, 
Chaps.  2,  3,  4,  5,  9,  10 ;   Part  iii,  Chaps.  1-6,  8,  10. 


HONOR  COURSE  IN  MENTAL  AND  MOKAL  PHILOSOPHY.  95 

3eniou  fkeshman  year. 

Michaelmas  Lectures  and  Hilary  Examination. 
Logic. 

Course  of  reading  recommended  : — 

Keynes'  Logic,  as  in  Junior  Freshman  Honor  Course. 
Joseph's  Introduction  to  Logic,  Chaps.  17-25. 
Bacon's  Novum  Organum,  Bk.  i. 

Hilary  Lectures  and  Trinity  Examination.  ^ 

Psycliology. 

Course  of  reading  recommended  : — 
Hoffding's  Psychology. 

Trinity  Lectures  and  Michaelmas  Examination. 
Modern  Pre -Kantian  Intellectualism. 
Course  of  reading  recommended : — 
Descartes'  Meditations. 

Leibniz'  Monadology  and  New  System  (with  Explanations). 
Spinoza's  Ethics,  Bks.  i  and  ii. 

Sophistek  Course. 

Elach  term  special  attention  is  given  to  some  period  or  school  of 
Philosophy. 

In  each  period  the  corresponding  portions  in  Schwegler's  History 
of  Philosophy  and  either  A.  K.  Rogers'  StudenVs  History  of 
Philosophy,  or  Alexander's  Short  History  of  Philosophy,  should 
be  consulted. 

In  addition  to  questions  from  the  books  recommended,  general 
and  critical  questions  will  be  asked  ;  and  CaDdidates  should  studj' 
the  books  from  this  point  of  view. 

JUNIOR  SOPHISTEK    rEAB. 
Michaelmas  Lectures  and  Hilary  Examination. 

English  Pre-Eantian  Philosophy. 

Course  of  reading  recommended  ; — 

Locke's  Essay  Concerning  Human  Understanding,  Introduction,  and 

Bks.  ii  and  iv. 
Berkeley's  Principles  of  Human  Knowledge. 
Hume's  Enquiry  Concerning  Human  Understanding. 

Hilary  Lectures  and  Trinity  Examination. 
The  Philosophy  of  Kant. 

Course  of  reading  recommended  : — 
Kant's  Kritik  of  the  Pure  Reason,  to  the  end  of  the  Analytic. 


96         HONOK  COURSE  IN    MENTAL   AND   MOEAL   PHILOSOPHY. 

Trixity  Lectures  and  Michaelmas  Examination. 

The  Philosophy  of  Kant. 

Course  of  reading  recommended  : — 

Kant's  Kritik  of  the  Fure  Reason,  the  Dialectic  and  Methodology. 

senior  sophister  teak. 
Michaelmas  Lectuues  and  Hilary  Examination. 
Ancient  Ethics. 

Course  of  reading  recommended  : — 
Plato's  Republic. 
Aristotle's  Ethicf. 

Hilary  Lectures. 
Modern  Ethics. 

Course  of  reading  recommended  : — 

Kant's  Fundamental  Principles  of  the  Metaphysie  of  Morals. 
Kant's  Kritik  of  the  Fractieal  Reason. 
Butler's  Sermons  and  Nature  of  Virtue. 
Spencer's  Data  of  Ft  hies. 
Sorley's  Ethics  of  Naturalism. 

Tkinity  Lectures. 
The  Philosophy  of  Hegel. 

Course  of  reading  recommended  :  — 

Hegel's  Subjective  Logic,  Introductory  Chapters  and  Section  1. 


§  IV. — EXPEEIMENTAL   SCIENCE. 

Candidates  in  Experimental  Science  are  required  to  answer  in 
two  Courses,  one  in  Experimental  Physics,  the  other  in  Chemistrj, 
and  also  in  a  Course  in  Mathematics  in  the  Freshman  Years. 

The  following  Syllabus  is  intended  to  indicate  the  general 
lines  on  which  the  Lectures  and  practical  work  will  be  arranged. 
The  Examination  in  each  Terra  will  be  more  especially  upon  the 
work  of  the  preceding  Term,  but  at  the  same  time  Students  will 
be  liable  for  any  of  the  previous  work. 

JUNIOR  FRKSHMEN. 

Hilary  Examination. 

Course  in  Mathematics. 

Elementary  statics,  dynamics,  and  hydrostatics. 


HONOR  COTJHSE  IN   EXPERIMENTAL   SCIENCE.  97 

Course  in  Experimental  Physics. 

Methods  of  accurate  measurement  of  length,  area,  volume,  time, 
mass,  and  pressure.  Plotting  of  curves  ;  the  slope  and  area  of  curves. 
Laws  of  motion,  acceleration  due  to  gravity,  simple  pendulum.  The 
simple  machines.  Laws  of  friction.  Momentum  and  energy.  Boyle's 
Law.  Principle  of  Archimedes.  Measurement  of  densities  and  atmo- 
spheric pressure.  Expansion  of  substances  due  to  heat.  Air  and  liquid 
in  glass  thermometers.     Calorimetry.     Specific  and  latent  heats. 

Practical  Work, — Vernier,  micrometer  screw,  spherometer,  plani- 
meter,  densities  of  solids,  liquids,  and  gases,  simple  pendulum,  accelera- 
tion due  to  gravity.  Coefficients  of  expansion.  Water  equivalent  of 
calorimeter.  Specific  heat  of  a  solid  and  latent  heats  of  liquefaction  of 
ice,  and  of  steam. 

Course  in  Inorganic  Chemistry. 

Physical  and  chemical  changes ;  elements  and  compounds.  Hydrogen. 
Boyle's  law  ;  Gay  liussac's  law  ;  diffusion  ;  electrolysis.  Oxygen  ; 
combustion  ;  classification  of  oxides.  Water,  its  composition  and  pro- 
perties. Lawof  definite  proportions  ;  equivalents.  Hydrogen  peroxide ; 
ozone.  Law  of  multiple  proportions  ;  atomic  theory  ;  symbols,  formulae, 
and  chemical  equations  ;  Gay  Lussac's  law  of  volumes ;  Avogadro's 
hypothesis  ;  densities  of  gases  and  molecular  weights.  The  atmosphere  ; 
nitrogen  ;  ammonia ;  oxides  and  oxyacids  of  nitrogen  ;  acids ;  bases 
and  salts  ;  valency.  Preparation  and  properties  of  carbon,  the  halogens, 
sulphur,  phosphorus,  silicon,  boron,  and  of  their  chief  compounds. 
Oxidising  and  reducing  agents.     Rational  formula;. 

Practical  Work. — Systematic  qualitative  analysis  of  salts  for  negative 
radicals  only.  The  experimental  verification  of  equations  expressing 
simple  interactions,  and  involving  accurate  weighings  with  the  chemical 
balance. 

Trinity  Examination. 

Course  in  Malhetnatics. 

Axes  of  coordinates.  Graphs.  Form  of  curves  given  by  Cartesian 
Equation  of  first  and  second  degree.  Infinitesimals,  limiting  values, 
differential  coefficients,  differentiation  of  algebraic,  trigonometricnl, 
logarithmic,  and  exponential  expressions. 

Course  in  Experimental  Physics. 

Magnets  and  lines  of  magnetic  force.  Laws  of  magnetic  force  and 
fields  of  force  due  to  magnets.  Moments  of  magnets.  Magnetic  effects 
of  electric  currents.  Tangent  galvanometer.  Ammeters  for  measure- 
ment of  electric  currents.  Heat-production  by  electric  cuirent,  and 
calculation  of  electric  pressures.  Current-voltmeters  for  measurement 
of  pressures.  Electric  power  measurement.  Olim's  Law — measure- 
ment of  resistance. 

Practical  Work. — Lines  of  magnetic  force.  Field  on  axis  of  small 
magnet.  Comparison  of  magnetic  moments.  Tangent  galvanometer. 
Standardization  of  ammeters.  Pressure  by  heating  effect.  Variation 
01  current  with  resistance.  Battery  pressure.  Resistances  in  series 
and  parallel  by  post-office  box.     Specific  resistance. 


98  HONOK  COURSE   IN   EXPERIMENTAL  SCIENCE. 

Course  in  Inorganic  Chemistry. 

Atomic  weights ;  specific  heats  of  solid  elements  ;  isomorphism  ; 
the  periodic  arrangement  of  the  elements.  Metals  and  non-metals ; 
preparation  and  properties  of  the  commonly  occurring  metals,  and  of 
their  chief  compounds. 

Practical  Work. — Qualitative  analysis  as  before.  Experimental 
verification  of  equivalents  of  elements,  and  of  basicity  and  molecular 
weights  of  acids. 

Michaelmas  Examination. 
Course  in  3IaLh,emalics. 

Differentiation  of  higher  orders  than  first.  Taylor's  theorem. 
Fundamental  principles  of  Integral  Calculus.  Integration  of  simple 
forms. 

Application  of  calculus  to  determination  of  slope,  and  area  of  curves, 
and  determination  of  equation  of  tangent  and  normal.  Elementary 
geometrical  optics. 

Course  in  Experimental  Phynics. 

Simple  vibration.  Harmonic  motion.  Vibrations  of  particles  and 
bodies.  Wave  motion.  Echo  resonance.  Strings  and  pipes.  Musical 
intervals.  Laws  of  reflection  and  refraction  by  light.  Mirrors  and 
lenses.     Telescopes  and  microscopes.     Explanation  of  waves. 

Practical  Work. — Vibrations  of  strings  by  sonometer.  Wave-length 
by  resonance  siren.  Plotting  lays  for  convex  and  concave  mirrors 
Parallax  method  for  concave  mirror.  Index  of  refraction  of  glass  block. 
Index  of  refraction  of  prism  by  position  of  minimum  deviation.  Focal 
lengths  of  lenses. 

Course  in  Inorganic  Chemistry. 
Inorganic  Chemistry  as  before. 
Practical  Work.  —  Qualitative  analysis  as  before.     Preparation  of  some 
chemical  compounds  by  processes  involving  crystallization,  &c. 

senior  fueshmen. 

Hilary  Examination. 

Course  in  Mathematics. 

Centrifugal  forces.  Simple  harmonic  motion.  Simple  pendulum. 
Angular  velocity.  Moment  of  momentum  and  kinetic  energy  of 
rotating  bodies.  Physical  meaning  of  moment  of  inertia.  Motion  of 
particle  in  a  vertical  circle.  Application  of  calculus  to  determination 
of  centres  of  gravity,  centres  of  pressure,  and  moments  of  inertia. 

Coarse  in  Experimental  Physics.  j 

General  properties  of  solids,  liquids,  and  gases.  Elementary  dis- 
cussion of  kinetic  theory.  Diffusion.  Surface  tension.  Young's 
Modulus.  Moments  of  inertia.  Ballistic  pendulum.  Torsion.  Compound 
pendulum.  Thermometry.  Calorimetry.  Fusion  and  evaporation. 
Saturated  vapours.  Hygrometry.  Mechanical  equivalent  of  heat. 
Elementary  study  of  conductivity,  diffusivity,  and  radiation. 


HONOR  COURSE   IN   EXPKRIMENTAL   SCIENCE.  99 

Practical  Work. — Surface  tension  of  water.  Young's  Modulus. 
Velocity  of  a  bullet.  Compound  pendulum.  Moment  of  inertia  and 
torsional  rigidity.  Specific  heats  (solids  and  liquids),  and  latent  heat  of 
water  and  steam,  with  corrections  for  radiation,  &c.  "Wet  and  dry  bulb, 
and  Crova's  hygrometers.  Measurement  of  mechanical  equivalent  of 
heat,  mechanically  and  electrically. 

Course  in  Chemislnj. 

The  History  of  Chemistry  : — Aristotle  ;  the  Alchemists ;  Robert 
Boyle ;  theories  of  combustion,  Boyle,  Mayow,  Beclier,  Stahl,  Lavoisier  ; 
the  work  of  Black,  Cavendish,  Priestley,  Bergmann,  Schelle,  Lavoisier, 
Berthollet,  Proust,  Ricliter ;  Dalton's  atomic  theory  and  older  theories  ; 
equivalents  ;  Gay  Lussac's  law  of  volumes ;  Avogadro's  hypothesis ; 
molecular  and  atomic  weights.  Elementary  Chemistry  of  the  non- 
metals  and  metals  as  before. 

Organic  Chemistry. — Destructive  distillation  of  wood  ;  hydrolysis  of 
celluloie  and  of  starch ;  isomerism ;  fermentation ;  constitution  and 
properties  of  methyl  alcohol  and  of  ethyl  alcohol ;  limited  oxidation  of 
alcohols  ;  acetic  acid  and  formic  acid  ;  esterification  and  saponification  ; 
properties  of  the  acids  of  the  acetic  series;  different  types  of  alcohols; 
tlie  paraffinoid  hydrocarbons. 

I'racttcal  Work. — Complete  qualitative  analysis  of  single  salts  soluble 
in  water.  Volumetric  analysis  ;  alkalimetry  and  acidimetry  ;  prepara- 
tion of  normal  sulphuric  acid  ;  use  of  indicators. 

Tbinity  Examination. 
Course  in  Mathematics. 

Elementary  partial  differentiation.  Motion  of  centre  of  inertia  of  a 
system  of  masses.  Problems  on  conservation  of  momentum,  moment  of 
momentum  and  energy.  DilFerential  equation  of  simple  harmonic 
motion,  and  application  to  cases  of  bodies  moving  with  simple  harmonic 
motion. 

Course  in  £lx])erimental  Physics. 

Terrestrial  magnetism,  dip,  declination,  and  force.  Accurate  measure- 
ment of  current,  pressure,  ajid  resistance.  Electrolysis.  Chemical 
batteries.  Polarization.  Electro-magnetism  and  laws  of  electro- 
magnetic induction.  Bells,  telegraphs,  telephones.  Elementary  treat- 
ment of  dynamos,  motors,  magneto.     Induction  coils. 

Practical  Work. — Moment  of  magnet  and  horizontal  component  or 
Earth's  magnetic  force.  Dip.  Standardization  of  ammeter  by  cooper 
voltameter.  Potentiometer  measurements  for  pressure,  current,  and 
resistance.  Standardization  of  voltmeters.  Specific  resistance  of 
electrolyte.  Standardization  of  sensitive  giilvanometer  for  continuous 
current.     Pressure  and  power  curves  for  dynamo  and  motor. 

Course  in  Chemistry. 

The  Chemistry  of  the  non-metals  more  fully  considered.     Hydrogen  ; 

the  halogens  ;  dissociation  ;   electrochemical  character  of  the  elements  ; 

exothermic  and  endothermic  reactions ;  heat  of  formation  of  compounds  ; 

oxidising    and    reducing  agents.      The   oxygen   group   of   elements ; 

f2 


100  HONOK   COUKSE  IN  EXPERIMENTAL   SCIENCE. 

catalytic  action  ;  liquefaction  of  gases ;  allotropic  forms  of  oxygen  and 
sulphur ;  acid  forming  sulphides,  basic  sulphides,  and  persulphides  ; 
compounds  of  elements  of  the  oxj'gen  group ;  compound  radicals ; 
constitutional  formulae ;  valency.  The  elements  of  the  nitrogen  group 
and  their  compounds.     The  inert  gases.     Carbon  and  silicon  ;  boron. 

Organic  Chemistry. — Preparation  and  general  properties  of  aldehydes 
and  ketones.  Preparation  and  properties  of  acid  amides  ;  constitution 
of  hydrocyanic  acid  ;  amino-acids  ;  jireparation  of  amines  ;  distinction 
between  the  different  types  of  amines  and  quaternary  bases.  Organo- 
metallic  derivatives. 

Fractical  Work. — Determination  of  molecular  weights  of  organic 
acids  and  bases.  Volumetric  analysis  involving  the  use  of  oxidising  and 
reducing  agents.  Complete  qualitative  analysis  of  single  inorganic  salts 
soluble  in  water  or  in  acids. 

Michaelmas  Examinatfon. 
Course  in  mathematics. 

Attractions.  Inverse  square  law.  Attraction  of  spherical  shell, 
solid  sphere,  and  thin  plate.  Verification  of  inverse  square  law.  Lines 
of  force.  Gauss's  theorem.  Tubes  of  forces.  Conducting  surfaces. 
Force  on  element  of  surface  of  charged  conductor.  Potential.  Equi- 
potential  surfaces.  Potential  of  spherical  shell  and  solid  sphere. 
Potential  of  magnet.  Magnetic  shell.  Energy  of  mutually  repulsive 
system. 

Course  in  Experimental  Physics. 

Analytical  and  grapliical  representation  of  sound-waves.  Velocity  of 
wave-propagation  along  a  string,  and  sound-waves  in  air.  Beats. 
Stationary  vibrations,  summation,  and  difference  tones.  Chronograph 
measurement  of  frequency.  Velocity  of  light.  Photometry.  Dispersion 
and  rainbow.    Eyepieces.    Magnifying  power  of  optical  instruments. 

Fractical  Work. — Chronograph  for  frequency  and  velocity  of  rotation 
measurement.  Shadow,  Joly,  and  Flicker  photometers.  Goniometer. 
Spectrometer  for  measurement  of  refractive  index  and  dispersive  power. 
Accurate  methods  of  measuring  focal  lengths  and  estimation  of  errors. 
Eadii  of  curvatui'e  and  index  of  refraction  for  lenses.  Magnifying 
power  of  telescopes  and  microscopes. 

Course  in  Chemistry. 

Chemistry  of  the  non-metals  as  before.  Methods  of  determining 
atomic  weights  more  fully  considered  ;  specific  heats  of  elements  and 
compounds ;  isomorphism  ;  the  periodic  classification  of  the  elements. 
The  Chemistry  of  the  metals  based  on  the  periodic  table. 

Organic  Chemistry. — Derivatives  of  the  olefine  series  of  hydrocarbons. 
Glycol;  hydroxy  acids;  dicarboxylic  acids  and  their  derivatives; 
physical  isomerism.  Unsaturated  acids  ;  stereo-isomerides.  Gl3'cerol ; 
allylic  alcohol.  Glucosides.  Polyhydric  alcohols  ;  the  Chemistry  of  the 
typical  sugars  ;  constitution  and  synthesis  of  dextrose  and  laevulose. 

Fractical  Work. — Problems  in  volumetric  analysis  involving  the 
combined  use  of  acids  or  bases  and  oxidising  or  reducing  agents. 
Qualitative  analysis  as  before,  but  including  the  commoner  organic 
acids— acetic,  formic,  oxalic,  tartaric,  citric,  sulphocyanic  and 
hydrocyanic  acid. 


HONOB  COURSE  I^  EXPEEIMENTAL  SCIENCK.  101 

JUNIOR   SOPHISTERS. 
Hilary  Examination. 
Course  in  Exj^erimental  l^hysics. 
General  properties  of  matter,  moments  of  inertia,  variation  of  atmo- 
spheric pressure   with   height,    compressibility   of  solids  and   liquids, 
elastic  properties  of  solid?,  torsion,  flexure,  work  done  by  elastic  forces. 

Heat. — Mechanical  equivalent  of  heat,  air  and  platinum  thermome- 
ters, M'eight  thermometer,  cubical  expansion  of  solids,  Regnault's 
experiments  on  the  expansion  of  gases,  maximum  density  of  M-ater, 
Regnault's  experimsr-tf  on  steam-pressure,  critical  temperature, 
pressure,  and  volume,  chunge  of  volume  acccmpanying  change  of 
state,  Joly's  steam  caloiimeter,  vet  and  dry  bulb  hygrometer,  chemical 
hygrometer,  Bunsen's  ice  calorimeter,  conductivity,  diffusivity,  radia- 
tion, equality  of  radiating  and  absorbing  powers,  selective  absorption, 
diathermancy.     The  steam-engine.     Meteorology. 

Practical  Work.—V&&  of  the  cathetometer,  dividing  engine,  chemical 
balance,  Kater's  pendulum,  piezometer;  use  of  weight  and  air  thermo- 
meters, Joly's  steam  calorimeter  and  Bunsen's  ice  calorimeter,  measure- 
ment of  vapour  density  and  pressure,  wet  and  dry  bulb  hygrometer, 
correction  for  radiation  in  calorimetry,  measurement  of  heat  of  com- 
bustion, specific  heat  of  gases,  conductivity,  diffusivity,  mechanical 
equivalent  of  heat. 

Course  in  Chiiuistrxj. 

(At  each  Examination  in  the  Sophister  years,  qiiostiens  may  be  asked,  not  only  en 
the  subjects  comprised  in  the  Course  specified  for  that  Examination,  but  also  in  all 
earlier  Courses.) 

Inorganic  Chemistry  as  before.  Eadium  ;  radio-activity  ;  the  bearing 
of  the  study  of  radio-activity  on  our  conceptions  of  the  atom  and  on  the 
periodic  classification  of  t)ie  elements  ;  isotopes. 

The  general  properties  of  gases : — Laws  of  Boyle,  Gay  Lussac, 
Dalton  ;  Avogadro's  hypothesis  ;  specific  heat  at  constant  pressure  and 
constant  temperature  ;  behaviour  of  gases  under  high  pressures  ;  lique- 
faction. The  general  properties  of  liquids : — surface  tension  ;  vapour 
piesstire  ;  lieat  of  vaporisation  ;  tlie  boiling  point.  The  general  properties 
of  solids  : — the  melting  point ;  vapour  pressure  ;  the  volatilising  point. 
Mixtures  of  gases,  of  liquids,  and  of  solids;  additive  properties.  Vapour 
pressures  and  boiling  points  of  mixed  liquids  (including  pairs  of  non- 
miscible  and  partially  miscible  liquids)  ;  composition  of  liquid  and 
vapour  phases  ;  fractional  distillation. 

Honor  Lectures  on  Physical  Chemistry  for  Junior  Sophisters  Mill  be 
given  once  a  week. 

Organic  Chemistry. — The  Course  for  Senior  Freshmen  more  fully 
treated. 

Honor  Lectures  on  Organic  Chemistry  will  be  given  on  Mondays  and 
Wednesdays. 

Practical  Work. — Analysis  of  mixed  substances  containing  not  more 
than  two  metals.  Detection  of  alkaloids  and  organic  acids.  Various 
problems  in  volumetric  analysis.  Typical  gravimetric  analyses. 
Determination  of  boiling  points  and  melting  points. 


102  HONOR  COURSE  IN  EXPERIMENTAL  SCIENCE. 

Trinity  Examination. 
Electricity  and  Maynetism. 

Molecular  nature  of  magnetism,  terrestrial  magnetism,  biBhir  and 
vertical  magnetometers,  dip  circle,  declination  circle  ;  mirror  galvano- 
meter, magnetic  system  of  units,  ballistic  galvanometer,  magnetic  per- 
meability, electro -magnetic  induction,  construction  of  dynamos  and 
motors,  Ruhmkorff's  coil,  electrolysis,  migration  of  ions,  potentiometer, 
chemical  batteries,  polarisation,  thermo-electricity,  electrical  radiation. 

Electrostatics. — Laws  of  force,  distribution  on  conductor,  induction, 
electroscopes,  condensers,  machines,  quadrant  and  guard-ring  electro- 
meters, electiostatic  voltmeter,  capacity. 

Practical  Work. — Use  of  bifilar  magnetometer,  dip  and  declination 
circles,  mirror  and  ballistic  galvanometers,  voltameters,  measurement  of 
rate  of  migration  of  ions,  use  of  potentiometer,  measurement  of  capacity 
by  quadrant  electrometer  and  by  ballistic  galvanometer,  measurement 
of  low  and  high  resistance,  and  of  magnetic  permeability. 

Course  in  Chemistry . 

The  properties  of  dilute  solutions ;  osmotic  pressure  ;  direct  and 
indirect  methods  of  determining  osmotic  pressure ;  relation  between 
osmotic  and  gaseous  pressure.  The  kinetic  theory  of  gases  ;  application 
of  theory  to  gases  under  high  pressure  ;  Van  der  Waals's  theory 
and  generalisations  ;  the  critical  point  ;  methods  of  determining  the 
critical  constants.  Application  of  the  kinetic  theory  to  dissociating 
gases. 

Organic  Chemistry. — Unsaturated  hydrocarbides  and  their  chief 
derivatives.  The  hydroxy  acids.  Stereoisomerism.  Carbohydrates, 
natural  and  synthetic.     Urea  and  uric  acid,  and  their  derivatives. 

Practical  Work.  —Extension  of  volumetric  and  gravimetric  analysis. 
Determiiuition  of  nitrogen  in  organic  compounds  as  ammonia. 
Detection  of  common  elements  in  organic  compounds 

Michaelmas  Examination. 

Sound. — Graphic  and  analytical  representation  of  vibration  and  wave- 
motion,  compounding  vibrations,  interference,  diatonic  scale  and  tem- 
perament, intervals,  summation  and  difference  tones,  vowel  sounds,  vibra- 
tions of  bars  and  plates,  compounding  vibrations  in  rectangular  planes, 
Koenig's  flames,  phonograph,  resonators,  Doppler's  principle,  photo- 
graphic records. 

Light. — Velocity  of  propagation,  wave  theory,  reflection  and  refrae 
tion,    rectilinear  propagation  and  diffraction,   interference,  Newton's 
rings,  rainbow. 

Practical  Work. — Use  of  syren,  graphic  measurement  of  frequency, 
determination  of  velocity  of  sound,  Kundt's  method,  optical  method  of 
compounding  vibrations,  use  of  resonators,  diffraction  grating,  biprism, 
Fresnel's  mirrors,  Newton's  rings,  plotting  specti;um. 

Course  in  Chemistry. 
Determination  of  molecular  weights  of  liquids  from   their   surface- 
tension.     Determination  of  molecular  weight  of  dissolved  substances.. 
The    laws    of    electrolysis.      Molecular   associatioii    and    dissociation.} 
Nature  of  salt  solutions.     Thermal  Chemistry.  j 

^1 


HONOR   CODESE   IN    KXPERIMENTAL   SCIENCE.  103 

Orgnnic  Chemistry. — Ben/ene  and  its  honiologues,  and  their  more 
important  derivatives.  Cyclic  hydrocarbides  and  their  derivatives. 
The  alkaloids  and  their  constitution.     The  terpenes. 

Practical  /ro.*-/;.— Determination  of  nitrogen  in  organic  compounds 
by  absolute  method.  Identification  of  typical  organic  compounds.  Use 
of  polariscope.     Preparation  of  two  typical  organic  compounds. 

Note.— The  quantitative  practical  work  in  Experimental  Physics  and 
Chemistry  carried  out  acd  properly  recorded  during  this  year  will  be 
taken  into  account  in  deciding  the  merits  of  candidates. 

SENIOR    SOPHISTERS. 

HiLAUY  Examination. 

Course  in  Exjjerimental  Physics. 

Thermodynamics.  —  Indicator  diagrams,  isothermal  and  adiabatic 
changes,  specific  heats,  efficiency,  reversible  engines,  absolute  scale  of 
temperature,  flow  of  gas  through  a  porous  plug.   Kinetic  theory  of  gases. 

Electricity. — Alternating  currents,  dynamometers,  Cardew's  voltmeter, 
Kelvin  balance,  ammeters  and  voltmeters,  self-induction  and  mutual 
induction,  secohmmeter,  transformers,  characteristics  of  series,  shunt, 
and  compound  dynamos,  efficiency  of  electric  transmission  of  power, 
B.A.  measurement  of  the  Olim,  Lorentz'  method,  induction  motors, 
polyphase  currents,  theory  of  telegraphy. 

Practical  Work. — Taking  indicator  diagram,  determination  of  eflPects  of 
salts  in  solution  on  freezing  and  boiling  points. 

Measurement  of  coefficients  of  self-  and  mutual  induction,  capacity, 
strong  magnetic  fields,  efficiency  of  motors  and  lamps,  plotting  character- 
istics of  dynamos,  standardising  dynamometers  and  voltmeters. 

Course  in  Chemistry. 

The  relations  between  the  physical  properties — boiling  point,  molecular 
volume,  molecular  refraction,  nwlecular  rotation — of  compounds  and 
their  chemical  composition  and  constitution. 

Organic  Chemistry. — Determination  of  constitution  of  organic  sub- 
stances.    General  methods  of  identification  of  tlie  various  radicles. 

Note. — During  this  term  a  few  special  lectures  on  Organic  Chemistry 
will  be  given. 

Practical  Work. — Application  of  analysis  to  natural  and  artificial 
products.     Electro-chemical  analysis.     Gas  analysis. 

Trinity  Examination. 
Course  in  Experimental  Physics. 

General  properties  of  matter— Pressure  in  flowing  fluid,  spray  dis- 
tributors, momentum  and  energy  of  fluid,  viscosity,  electric  chrono- 
graph, rates  of  diffusion,  splieroidal  state. 

Light. — Colours,  achromatism,  anomalous  dispersion,  polnrization, 
Fresnel's  theory,  double  refraction,  Nicol's,  Rochon's,  and  "WoUaston's 
prisms,  wave  surface  in  crystals,  conical  refraction,  metallic  reflection, 
quarter  wave  plate,  Fresnel's  rhomb,  rings  and  crosses  of  polarized  light, 
rotatory  polarization,  mngnetic  action  on  light,  production  of  polarized 
light. 


101  HONOU   COtTRSE   IN   EXPEEIMENTAL    SCIEKCE. 

Practical  Work. — Pressure  inflowing  fluid,  measurement  of  coefficient 
of  viscosity,  of  velocity  of  bullet  electrically.  Plotting  anomalous  spec- 
trum, determination  of  focal  lines  for  light  through  lens  in  direction 
inclined  to  axis,  measurement  of  angle  between  optic  axes  of  crystal, 
observation  of  internal  and  external  conical  refraction,  measurement  of 
rotatory  power  of  sugar  solutions,  and  of  refractive  index  by  polarizing 
angle. 

Course  in  Che^nintry . 

Chemical  Mechanics: — Giildberg  and  Waage's  theory.  Chemical 
equilibrium : — Reversible  reactions  and  dissociation  phenomena. 
Chemical  dynamics. 

Organic  Chemistry. — Continuation  of  work  of  previous  term  with  a 
view  to  Chemical  research. 

Practical  Work. — Extension  of  previous  course.  Ultimate  organic 
analysis.  Determination  of  molecular  weiglits  by  various  recognized 
methods. 

Trinity  Tekm. 

During  the  three  Terms  of  the  Senior  Sophister  year,  Lectures 
are  delivered  in  Physics  on  the  Special  Course  for  Moderatorship 
specified  for  the  year. 

Each  Student  "will  can-y  out  during  Trinity  Term  an  investigation 
depending  on  the  special  course  he  has  selected  for  Moderatorship. 
The  results  should  be  handed  in  to  the  Professor  prior  to  the  Moderator- 
ship  Examination  in  October. 


§  V. — Natukax  Science. 

JUNIOR  AND    SENIOR   FRESHMAN    YEARS. 

Prizes  are  given  in  Natural  Science,  at  the  close  of  the  Junior 
and  Senior  Freshman  years.  The  Examinations  for  these  Prizes 
are  held  in  Michaelmas  Term,  on  days  specified  in  the  University 
Almanac.     The  following  Course  has  been  appointed : — 

JUNIOR   FRESHMEN. 

Zoology,     .     .     Entrance  Prize  Course. 

Morphology  and  Pliysiology  of  Amoeba,  Paramoe- 
ceum,  Vorticella,  Opalina,  Nyctotherus,  Hydra, 
Obelia,  Distorauin,  Taenia,  Lumbricus,  Scyllium, 
Eana  and  the  Osteology  of  Canis  or  J^epus ;  the 
development  of  Eana,  and  of  Gallus  up  to 
the  third  day.  ("Zoology"  by  Shepley  and 
MaoBride  may  be  consulted.) 

Botany,  .  .  The  Morphology  and  Physiology  of  the  following 
types: — Saccharomyces,ChlHmydomonas,Nostoc, 
•Bacillus,  Spirogyra,  Volvox,  Vaucheria,  Mucor, 
Phytophthora,  Penicillium,  Peziza,  Agaricus, 
Fucus,  Polysiphonia,  Marchantia,  Polytrichum, 
Aspidium,  Selaginella,  Pinius,  Scilla,  Ranun- 
culus. (Principles  of  Botany  :  Bergen  and  Davis. 
Practical  Plant  Biology  :  H.  H.  Dixon.) 


HONOR  COCJiSE  IN  NATURAL  SCIENCE. 


105 


Geology,  .  .  Huxley's  Physiography,  with  Geikie's  Class  Book 
of  Geology,  to  end  of  chap.  xiv.  A  practical 
acquaintance  with  the  rocks  and  minerals 
described  in  the  Course  will  be  expected  of  the 
candidate,  and  he  is  recommended  to  attend  the 
practical  demonstrations  given  in  Trinity  Term. 


SENIOR  FUESUMEN. 

ZooLOOY,  .  .  Entrance  Prize  Course  and  Junior  Freshman 
Course  as  before. 
Morphology  and  Embryology  of  Mammalian 
Orders,  or  of  Arthropoda,  Mollusca,  Echinoder- 
mata,  Polyzoa,  Chaltognatha,  Hemichoida,  and 
Urochorda.  ("Zoology"  by  Shepley  and 
MacBiide  may  be  consulted.) 

Botany,  .  .  As  before,  with  the  morphology  and  physiology 
of  the  following  types  : — Badhamia,  Puccinia, 
Physcia,  Pilobolus,  Pythium,  Pennularia, 
Drapernaldia,  Callithamnion,  Ectocarpus,  Pel- 
vetia,  Pellia,  Sphagnum,  Marsilia,  Pteris, 
Marattia,  Equisetum,  Lycopodium,  Taxus,  Poa, 
Iris,Cheiranthu8.  (Principles  of  Botany :  Bergen 
and  Davis.) 

Geology,  .  .  As  before,  with  the  Demonstrations  in  Petrology 
and  Mineralogy  of  Michaelmas  Term. 

N.B. — Students  are  recommended  to  apply  to  the  Professors  of  Zoology,. 
Botany,  and  Geology  for  access  to  specimens  illustrating  the  Courses. 

Tlie  Honor  Course  of  Lectures  in  Zoology  is  spread  over  the 
period  of  two  years  ;  the  first  is  devoted  to  the  Invertebrate,  the 
second  to  the  Vertebrate.  There  are  in  addition  Courses  in 
Parasitology,  Cytology,  and  Embryology  which  should  be 
attended,  especially  by  those  proposing  to  take  Zoology  as  tlie 
principal  subject  in  Moderatorship  A. 

Junior  and  Senior  Freshmen  taking  up  Natural  Science  may 
attend  with  advantage  the  Michaelmas  Term  Lectures  of  the 
Professor  of  Geology,  who  will  give  any  information  required  on 
application. 

In  the  Junior  Freshman  year  Students  are  recommended  to 
attend  the  lectures  and  practical  course  in  Botany  held  in  the 
Summer  Session  for  First  Year  Medical  Students. 

In  the  Senior  Freshman  year  classes  are  held  three  times  a 
week  during  term  in  School  of  Botany. 

For  further  infonnatioii  regarding  the  botanical  courses  in  the 
Senior  Freshman  year  Students  should  apply  to  the  Professor  of 
Botany. 

Honors  are  given  at  each  Examination  in  the  Junior  and  Senior 
Sophister  years. 


106 


HONOE   COURSE  IN   NATUKAL   SCIENCE. 


JUNIOR  SOrHlSTEH  YEAK. 

HiLAKY  Examination. 


Zoology, 


Botany, 


Geology, 


Morphology  and  Eintryology  of  Cephiilochonla, 
Cyclostomata,  Selachi,  and  Osteicbthyes,  or 
Morphology  and  Life- Cycle  of  Protozoa, 
and  Morphology  and  Embryology  of  Porifera 
and  Coelenterata.  (Oxfoid  Treatise  on 
Zoology,  and  Cambridge  Natural  History 
may  be  consulted.) 

.  As  before,  with  the  Professor's  Lectures  and 
tbe  practical  work  during  Michaelmas  Term. 
(Strasburger'sText  Book  of  Botany,  Part  ii., 
sect.  i.     Thallophyta  and  Bryophyta.) 

.  The  Professor's  lectures  during  Michaelmas 
Term.  The  student  should  refer  to  Geikie's 
Text  Book  of  Geology,  vol.  i.  Questions  in 
Elementary  Petrology  and  Mineralogy  will 
be  set. 


Trinity  Examination. 
Zoology,    ....  As  before,  with  the  Morphology  and  Embryo- 
logy of  Amphibia,   Reptilia,  and  Aves,  or 
Platyhelminthes,  Nemertinea,  Rotifera,  and 
Nenatoda.     (Text  Books  as  before.) 

Botany,  ....  As  before,  with  the  Professor's  Lectures  and 
the  practical  work  during  Hilary  Term. 
(Strasburger's  Text  Book.  Part  ii.,  sects,  i. 
and  ii.     Pteridophyta  and  Phanerogamia.) 

Geology,  ....  The  Professor's  lectures  and  the  Demonstra- 
tions in  Palaeontology  during  Hilary  Term. 
Lapworth's  Intermediate  Text  Book  of 
Geology,  Part  iii.,  and  Wood's  Palaeontology 
may  be  consulted.  Questions  in  Petrology 
and  Mineralogy  will  be  set. 


Michaelmas  Examination. 

Zoology As  before,  with  the  Morphology  and  Embryo- 
logy of  Mammalia,  or  of  Anthropoda,  Mol- 
lusca,  Echinodermata,  Polyzoa,  ChaltOo'- 
natlia,  Hemichorda,  and  Urochorda.  (Text 
Books  as  before.) 

Botany,  ....  As  before,  -with  the  Professor's  Lectures  and 
the  practical  Mork  during  Trinity  Term. 
(Strasburgei's  Text  Book.     Part  i.,  sec.  ii.) 

Geology The   work  for  the  Trinity  Examination  and 

Marr's  Principles  of  Stratigraphical  Geology. 


tfONOK  C0DR8E  IJJ  NATUKAL  SCIENCE.  10"? 


SKNIOK    SOPHISTKK   YEAR. 

IIiLAUY  Examination. 

^ooLOCJY,  ....  .^8  before,  with  additional  Embryology  and 
Cytology  lectures. 

Botany,     ....    As  before,  with  practical  work. 

Geology,  ....  The  work  for  the  Michaelmas  Examination  of 
the  Junior  Sophister  year.  Geikie's  Text 
liook  of  Geology,  vol.  ii,  may  be  consulted. 

Tkinity  Examination. 
Zoology,     ....  As  before,  with  microscopical  technique. 
Botany,       .     .      .     .   As  before,  with  practical  woik. 
Geology,    ....  As  for  the  Hilary  Examination. 

§  VI HisTOKY  and  Political  Science. 

JUNIOR  AND  SENIOR  FRESH.MAN  YEARS. 

Honor  Exaraiuations,  of  one  day  each,  in  Modem  History  are 
held  in  Hilary  and  Trinity  Terms  of  the  Junior  and  Senior 
Freshmen  years,  and  Prize  Examinations  in  Michaelmas  Terms. 

The  following  Course  has  been  appointed  : — 

JUNIOR    FRESHMAN    YEAR. 

p    .    ,  j  English  and  Irish  History,  449-148.5. 
lerioa  j  European  History,  476-1494. 
No  books  ate  specially  prescribed  for  any  of  the  examinations.     The 
following   are   recomineiided   only    as   a  guide   to  candidates  in  their 
reading  : — 

Hilary  Examination. 

A.  English  and  Irish  History,  449-1066.     (One paper)  : 

[Oman,  .  England  before  the  Norman  Conquest. 

Joyce,  .  Short  History  of  Ireland:  Part  II.] 

B.  European  History,  476-918.     [One  paper)  : 

[Oman,  .  The  Dark  Ages. 

Bryce,  .   The  Holy  lioman  Empire,  chaps.  1-6. 

Davis,  .   Charlemagne.'] 

Trinity  Examination. 

A.  English  and  Irish  History,  1066-1272.     {One paper): 

[Davis,  .  England  tender  the  Normans  and  Anqevins. 

Joyce,  .  Short  History  of  Ireland:  Part  III,  chaps,  i  to 

X,  inclusive.] 

B.  European  History,  918-1273.     [One paper): 

[Tout,  .   The  Empire  and  the  I'apacy. 

Bryce,  .   The  Holy  Roman  Empire,  chaps.  6-13. 

Fisher,  .   The  Medieval  Empire,  chaps.  1,  3,  7,  10.] 

Michaelmas  Examination. 
A.  English  and  Irish  History,  1272-1485.     [Two  papers): 

[Hunt  and  Poole,   The  I'olitical  History  of  England,  Vols,  iimndiv. 
Trevelyan,  .  England  in  the  Age  of  JFycliffe. 

Gairdner,  .  Introduction  to  The  Faston  Letters. 

Bagwell,  .  Ireland  under  the  Tudors,  chaps.  .5-7. 

O'Connor  Morris,  Ireland  [eA.  Dunlop),  chap.  2.] 


108   .     HONOK  COURSE  IN  HISTOET  AND  POLITICAL  SCIENCE. 

B.  European  History,  1273-1494.     [Two  papers) : 
[Lodge,  .   The  Close  of  the  Middle  Ages. 

11  \  Hisloire  Generale,  vol.  iir,  chaps.  1-6. 

Armstrong,  .  Lorenzo  de"  Medici.'] 

SENIOK  FllESHMAN   YEAR. 

p    .    ,  j  English  and  Irish  History,  1485-1801. 
l-erioa  I  European  History,  1494-1814. 

Hilary  Examination. 

A.  English  and  Irish  History,  1485-1603.     {One paper) : 

Hunt  and  Poole,  The  Political  Sistory  of  England,  vol.  v. 

Pollard,  .  Henry  VIII. 

Creighton,  .   Queen  Elizabeth. 

O'Connor  Morris,  Ireland  (ed.  Dunlop),  chaps.  3,  4. 

B.  European  History,  1494-1598.     [One  paper)  : 

Johnson,  .  Europe  in  the  Sixteenth  Century. 

The  Cambridge  Modern  History,  vol.  i,  chap.  19. 

Trinity  Examination. 

A.  English  and  Irish  History,  1603-1714.     [One  paper) : 

Trevelyan,  .  England  under  the  Stuarts. 

Firth,  .  Oliver  Cromwell. 

Gardiner,  .  CromtveWs  Tlace  in  History. 

Lecky,  .  History  of  Ireland  in  the  Eighteenth  Century. 

chap.  1. 
2'he  Cambridge  Modern  History,  vols,  iv,  chap.  18  ;  v,  chap.  10. 

B.  European  History,  1598-1715.     (One  paper): 

Wakeman,  .   The  Ascendancy  of  France. 

Acton,  .  Lectures  on  Modern  History,  chaps.  9—15. 

Michaelmas  Examination. 

A.  English  and  Irish  History,  1714-1801.     {Two  papers) : 

Hunt  and  Poole,    The  Political  History  of  England,  vols,  ix  and  x. 
Morley,  .    Walpole. 

Morley,  .  Burke. 

Rosehery,  .  Pitt. 

Lecky,  .  History  of  Ireland  in  the  Eighteenth  Century, 

chaps.  2-5,  7,  8,  12,  13. 

The  Cambridge  Modern  History,  vol.  vi,  chap.  14. 

B.  European  History,  1715-1814.     {Two  Papers) : 

Hassall,  .  The  Balance  of  Power. 

Morse  Stephens,  Revolutionary  Europe. 

Johnston,  .  History  of  the  French  Revolution. 

Rose,  .  Napoleonic  Studies. 


HONOK  COURSE  IN  HISTOEY  AND  POLITICAL  SCIENCE. 


109 


JUNIOR   SOPHISTEK  YEAU. 


Honors  are  given  in  History  and  Political  Science  at  each 
Examination  in  the  Junior  Sophister  year. 

No  books  are  specially  prescribed  for  any  of  the  examinations.  The 
following  are  recommended  only  as  a  guide  to  candidates  in  their 
reading : — 

Hilary  Examination. 
A.  English  Constitutional  Uistoiy,  to  1307.     {One  paper) 


[Maitland, 
M'Kechnie, 
Stubbs, 

Petit-Dutaillis,  . 

Medley, 

B.  European  History. 
[Stevenson, 
Sybel, 
Stubbs, 

Archer, 
Oman, 


The  Constitutional  History  of  England. 

Magna  Carta.     Historical  Introduction. 

The  Constitutional  History  of  England,  chaps. 

15  and  19, 
Studies  Supplementary  to  Stubbs^  Constitutional 

History. 
English  Constitutional  History."] 

The  First  Three  Crusades.     {One  paper) : 

The  Crusaders  in  the  East. 

History  and  Literature  of  the  Crusades. 

Preface   to  Itinerarium   Regis  liicardi    (Rolls 

Series). 
The  Crusade  of  Richard  I. 
The  Art  of  War  in  the  Middle  Ages.] 


C.  Economic  History.     Outlines  of  History  to  1600. 

[Meredith,  .  Economic   History   of  England. 

Books  I  and  ii.] 


Introduction, 


TuiNiTY  Examination. 

A.  English  Constitutional  History,  to  1625.     {One  paper) : 

[Maitland,  .  The  Constitutional  History  of  England. 

Dicey,  .  2'he  Privy  Council. 

Prothero,  .  Introduction  to  Select  Statutes,  etc.,  1558-1625. 

Medley,  .  English  Constitutional  History,] 

B.  European  History.     France    in    the   Seventeenth    Centuiy.     {One 

paper)  : 
[Cambridge Modern  History,  iix.  20;  iv,  4,  21  ;  v,  1,  2,  3,  4, 13,  14. 
Lavisse,  .  Histoire  de  France. 

Willert,  .  Henry  of  Navarre. 

Perkins,  .  Richelieu. 

Retz,  .  Memoires. 

Tilley,  .  Selections  from  Saint- Simon.] 

C.  Economic  History.     Outlines  of  History,  1600-1760. 

[Meredith,  .  Economic  History.     Book  iii. 

Unwin,  .  Industrial  Organization.] 


1 10         HONOR  COUKSE  IN  HISTORY  AND  POLITICAL  SCtENCE. 


Michaelmas  Examination. 

A.  English  Conslitutionul  History,  from  1625.     (One  paper) : 

[Maitland,  .   The  Constitutional  History  of  England. 

Gardiner,  .  Introduction  to  Constitutional  Documents,  1625-' 

1660. 
Dicey,  .  The  Law  of  the  Constitution. 

Low,  .   The  Governance  of  England. 

Medley,  .  English  Constitutional  History."] 

B.  European  History,  1814-1878.     {One paper) : 

["W.Alison  Phillips,   Modern  Europe. 
The  Cambridge  Modern  History,  vols,  x  and  xi  (for  reference)]. 

C.  Economic  History.     Outlines  of  History,  1760-1900. 

[Meredith,  .  Economic  History.     Book  iv. 

Toynbee,  .  Industrial  Revolution.] 

§  VII. — Modern  Litekaxdre. 

Separate  Honor  Examinations  are  held  each  Term  in  the 
Freshman  years  in  English  Literature,  in  French,  in  German,  in 
Italian,  and  in  Spanish. 

The  following  Courses  have  been  appointed : — 

ENGLISH  LITERATURE. 

Junior  Fkeshmex. 
Hilary  Examination. 

History  of  English  Literature  :  1500  to  1600,  but  including  whole 
career  of  Shakespeare;  as  in  Wyatt  and  Low's  Text- Book  of 
English  Literature. 

Sliakespeare  :  A  Midsummer  Night's  Dream  ;   Henry  V. 

Spenser:  The  Faery  Queene,  book  i. 

More:  Utopia,  with  Roper's  Life  of  More  (ed.  Luniby,  Cambridge). 

Palgrave's  Golden  Treasury,  book  i. 

Trinity  Examination. 

Histoiy  of  English  Literature:  1600  to  1660,  but  including  whole 

career  of  Milton  ;  as  in  Wyatt  and  Low. 
Shakespeare:  Julius  Caesar;  Coriolanus. 
Spenser  :  The  Faery  Queene,  book  ii. 
Bacon :  Essays. 
Palgrave's  Golden  Treasury,  book  ii. 

Michaelmas  Examination. 

History  of  English  Literature  :  from  the  beginnings  to  1500,  as  in 

Wyatl  and  Low. 
Shakespeare :  As  You  Like  It ;  Twelfth  Night. 
Milton  :  Lycidas ;  Comus. 
Spenser:  Colin  Clout's  Come  Home  Again. 
Sidney:  Apology  of  Poetry. 


d 


HONOR  COURSE  iN  MODEKN  LltERATtJKE*  111 

SkNIOU    FlllitiHMEN. 

Hilary  Examination. 

History  of  English  Literature:   1660  to  1798,   as  iu  Wyatt  and 

Low. 
Chaucer:   Prologue  to  Canterbury  Tales. 
Shakespeare  :  Merchant  of  Venice  ;  The  Tempest. 
Milton:  Paradise  Lost,  books  i,  ii;  Areopagitica. 

Trinity  Examination. 

History  of  English  Literature:   179S  to   1832,  as  in  Wyatt  and 

Low. 
Chaucer  :  Knight's  Tule  ;    Squire's  Tale  ;  Nun's  Priest's  Tale. 
Sliakespeare  :  Richard  III ;  Romeo  and  Juliet. 
Addison :  Coverley  Papers,  and  Critical  Papers,  from  the  Spectator 

(selections  ed.  T.  Arnold,  Oxford). 

Michaelmas  Examimition. 

Chaucer:    Clerk's  Tale;    Prioress's  Tale;    Sir  Thopas ;  Prologue 

to  Legend  of  Good  Women. 
Shakespeare  :  Macbeth  ;  Hamlet. 
Dryden  :  Absalom  and  Achitophel. 
Pope  :  Rape  of  the  Lock  ;  Essay  on  Criticism. 
Swift :  Drapier's  Letters. 

FRENCH. 

[Students  are  expected  to  make  themselves  acquainted  with  the 
outlines  of  the  History  of  France  so  far  as  it  bears  on  the  literary 
period  studied  in  ea(.h  Term.] 

The  studies  in  this  department  fall  into  the  following  three  divisions  : 

1.  Practical  exercises  in  the  use  of  the  spoken  and  written  languages  : 
Pionunciation,  Conversation,  Composition. 

2.  Theoretical  Study  of  the  French  Language  :  Grammar  of  Modern 
French,  History  of  the  French  Language. 

3.  History  of  French  Literature,  and  detailed  study  of  selected 
Literary  Works. 

JUNIOU    FUESHMEN. 

Hilary  Examination : 

Corneille :  Le  Cid,  Polyeucte,  Nicomede,  Le  Menteur. 

Racine  :  Andromaque  (Oxford). 

Balzac  :  Five  Short  Stories  (Cambridge). 

Trinity  Examination  : 

Moliere :  Les  Precieuses  Ridicules  (Lanson — Hachette) ;  Les 
Fenimes  Savautes  (Lanson — Hachette);  L' Avare  (Manchester 
University  Press);  Le  Misanthrope. 
Maupassant :  Six  Contes  (Cambridge  Univ.  Press). 
La  Fontaine :  Fables. 


112  HONOR  COUKSE   IN  MODEBN   LITEKATURK. 


Michaelmas  Examination  : 

Marivimx:  Theatre  (in  Tous  les  Chefs  d^ceuvre). 

Sainte  Beuve  :   Selections  (Tilley — Oxford  University  Press). 

Les  Epistoliers  du  xviii«  Siecle  (Deut's  Tous  les  Chefs  d'oeuvre) . 

Faguet :  Le  Dix-Huitieme  Siecle. 

Balzac :   P^re  Goriot. 

Senior  Fkbshmen. 

Hilary  Examination  : 

Balzac  :  Le  Cabinet  des  Antiques. 

V.   Hugo :    La   Legende    des    Siecles    (Oxford),    l^es   Feuilles 

d'Automne. 
Musset :    Les   Caprices  de  Marianne,    Fantasio,    Lorenzaccio, 
II  ne  faut  jurer  de  rien. 

Trinity  Examination : 

Balzac  :  Louis  Lauibert,  Les  Prosciits. 

Viele- Griffin  :  Plus  Loin. 

Leconte  de  Lisle  :  Poemes  barbares. 

Michaelmas  Examination  : 

Vigny  :  Selected  Poems  (Peers — Manchester  University  Press). 
Musset :    Poesies  Nouvelles   (excluding    Holla).     [In   iient's 

Tous  les  Chefs  d^CEuvre.'] 
Gautier :  Voyage  en  Itulie  (Pitt  Press). 
Renan  :  Souvenirs  de  Jeunesse. 


GERMAN. 
Honor  Course  in  German. 
The  studies  in  this  department  fall  into  the  following  three  divisions : 

1.  Practical  Study  of  the  German  Language:  Phonetics  and  Exercises 
in  Pronunciation,  Conversation,  Composition. 

2.  Theoretical  Study  of  the  Geiman  Language  :  Grammar  of  Modem 
German,  History  of  the  German  Language. 

3.  History  of  German  Literature,  and  detailed  study  of  selected 
Authors  and  Literary  Works. 

Note. — Students  are  expected  to  make  themselves  acquainted  with 
the  outlines  of  the  History  of  Germany  in  so  far  as  it  bears  on  the 
literary  period  studied  in  each  Term.  They  are  further  expected  to  pay 
some  attention  to  present-day  events  in  Germany,  and  passages  for 
Unseen  Translation  from  current  newspaper  and  magazine  literature 
will  he  set  at  the  various  examinations. 


i 


i 


HONOk  COURSE  IN  modRun  mteRatdke.  113 

The  following  Course  has  been  appointed.  It  is  to  be  noted  that 
questions  may  be  set  at  any  examination  from  any  part  of  the  Course 
for  a  previous  examination:— 

Junior  Freshmen. 
Silary  Exannnation  : 

Robertson  :  History  of  German  Literature,  Part  v.,  first  six 

chapters. 
Kleist :  Prinz  Friedrich  von  Homburg. 
Vietor :  DeutschLS  Lesebuch  in  Lautschrift,  II.  Teil. 
Victor  :  German  Pronunciation  :  Practice  and  Theory. 

Trinity  Examination : 

Robertson  :    History  of   German   Literature,  Part  v.,  chaps. 

vii.  to  xii.  (inclusive). 
Heine :  Buch  der  Lieder. 
Grillparzer  :  Der  Trauni,  ein  I.eben. 

Michaelmas  Examination : 

Robertson :  History  of  German  Literature,  Part  v.,  chap.  xiii. 

to  end. 
Hebbel :  Agnes  Bernauer. 
Siitterlin  und  Waag  :  Deutsche  Spracblehre. 

Senior  Frkshmen. 
Hilary  Examination  : 

Robertson:   History  of  German  Literature,  Part  iv.,  first  six 

chapters. 
Lessing  :  Die  Hamburgische  Dramaturgic. 
Lessing  :  Minna  von  Barnhelm. 

Trinity  Examination  : 

Robertson :    History  of  German  Literature,    Part  iv.,  chaps. 

vii.  to  X.  (inclusive). 
Lessing  :  Nathan  der  Weise. 
Lessing :  Emilia  Galotti. 

Michaelmas  Examination  : 

Robertson  :  Histoiy  of  German  Literature,  Part  iv. 
Schiller  :  Wallenstein — Lager  und  Piccolomini. 
Goethe  :  Hermann  und  Dorothea. 

Goethe :  Gedichte,  (Lieder,  Gesellige  Lieder,  Aus  W.  Meister, 
Balladen,  and  Vermischte  Gedichte.) 

ITALIAN. 

The  studies  in  this  department  fall  into  the  following  three  divisions  : — 

1 .  Practical  exercises  in  the  use  of  the  spoken  and  written  languages  : 
Pronunciation,  Conversation,  Composition. 

2.  Theoretical  study  of  the  Italian  Language  ;  Grammar  of  Modern 
Italian,  History  of  the  Italian  Language. 

3.  History  of  Italian  Literature,  and  detailed  study  of  selected 
Literary  works. 


114  HONOR  COURSE    IN   MODERN   IITKRATUIIK. 

Junior  Freshmen. 
Hilary  Examination : 

D'Annimzio :   Prose  Scelte  (Milan,  Treves). 

Hauvette  :  Litteniture  italienne,  Part  IV. 
Trinity  Examination  : 

Carducci:  Autologia  C;irdiicciana  (Bologna,  Zanichelli). 

Hauvette  :  Litterature  italienne,  Part  III. 

Michaelmas  Examination : 

Leopardi:  Prose  Morali  (Florence,  Sausoni). 
Hauvette  :  Litterature  italienne,  Part  II. 

Sexiok  Fkeshmen. 
Hilary  Examination  : 

Le  Cento  Migliori  Liriche  (Gowans  and  Gray). 
Gozzano  :  L'Altare  del  Passato. 
Hauvette  :  Litterature  italienne,  Part  I. 

Trinity  Examination : 

Fogazziiro  :  Piccolo  Mondo  antico. 

Metastasio:   Dramini  scelti  (as  for  Moderatorsliip) . 

Hauvette :  Dante. 

Michaelmas  Examination : 

Tasso  :  Gerusalemme  liberata,  cantos  i-x. 
Boccaccio:  Novelle  scelte  (as  for  Moderatorship). 
Hauvette  :  Boccace. 


SPANISH. 

Tlie  studies  in  this  department  fall  into  the  following  three  divisions  :— 

1.  Pracitical    exercises    in    the   use   of  the   spoken   and   M'ritten 
languiiges  :  pronunciation,  conversation,  composition. 

2.  Theoretical    study    of   the   Spanish    Language :    Grammar   of 

Modern  Spanisli,  History  of  the  Spanish  Langunge. 

3.  History  of  Spanish  Literature,  and  detailed  study  of  selected 

Literary  works. 

JuNioii  Freshmen. 
Hilary  Examination. 

Moratin  :   El  Si  de  las  Niiias  (Ginn). 

Cervantes :    El  Licenciado  Vidriera  and  La  Ilustre  Fregona 
(Cambridge). 

Trinity  Examination. 

Niijera  :  Cuentos  color  de  huino. 

Antologia  de  los  mejores  poetas  castellanos  (Nelson). 

Michaelmas  Examination. 

Pio  Baroja :  La  Ciudad  de  le  Niebla  (Nelson). 

Antonio  Machado  :  Campos  de  Castilla. 

Azorin :  Al  Mtirgen  de  los  Clasicos  (Residencia  de  Estudiantes). 


IIONOK  COURSK  IN  MODEKN  LITERATTTBE. 


115 


Senior  Freshmen. 
Hilary  Examination , 

Cervantes:  Don  Qtiijote.     Parti.,  1-26. 

Jose  de  Annas  :  El  Quijote  y  sa  Epoca  (Renaciniiento). 

Azorin  :  Los  Valores  literarios  (Renaciniiento). 

Trinity  Examination. 

Cervantes  :  Don  Quijote.     Part  i.,  27  to  end. 
Azorin:  Clasicos  y  Modernos  (Renacimiento). 

Michaelmas  Term. 

Cervantes:  Don  Quijote.     Part  ii. 

Azorin  :  J^a  Ruta  de  Don  Quijote  (Renaciniiento). 

Iciiza  :   El  Quijote  durante  ties  Siglos. 

Honors  are  given  in  Modern  Literature  at  each  Examination 
in  the  Junior  Sophister  year.  Candidates  are  permitted  to  take 
any  two  of  the  Kve  languages — English,  French,  German,  Italian, 
and  Spanisli.  The  numbers  of  marks  assigned  to  the  two 
languages  selected  by  a  Candidate  are  equal. 

The  following  Courses  have  been  appointed: — 

JUNIOR   80PH18TEU   YBAR. 

HiLAiiv  Examination. 

English,       .     Shakespeare;  King  Lear;  Antony  and  Cleopatra. 
iMilton  :  Samson  Agonistes. 

Wordsworth:  Matthew  ArnoM's  selection  (Macmillan). 
Palgrave's  Golden  Treasury,  Books  iii  and  iv. 
Burke  :  Refleutions  on  the  French  Revolution. 

French,        .     Sceve:  Delie  (Selections). 

Ronsard  :    Selected  Poems  (Lucas— Clarendon  Press), 

excluding  Odes. 
Du  Bellay :    Divers   jeiix  rustiques  et  autres  oeuvres 

poetiques  (Sansot) ;  Les  Regrets  (Sansot). 
Montaigne:  Extraits  (Petit  de  JuUeville— Delagrave). 
Lanson  :  Histoire  de  la  Litterature  frangaise,  Part  iii. 

German,       .     Robertson :    History   of  German   Literature,    Parts  i. 
and  ii.,  first  two  chapters. 
Schiller:  Wallensteins  Tod. 

Wright :  Grammar  of  the  Gothic  Language,  (Accidence, 
Syntax,  and  Text). 

Italian,   .     .     Dante :  Inferno. 

Petrarca:  Canzoniere. 

Poliziano :  Le  Stanze,  L'Orfeo,  e  le  Rime. 

Carducci :  Saggi  sul  Poliziano. 

Si'ANiSH,  .     .     Caldei on  :  El  Alcalde  de  Zalamea. 
La  Vida  es  Suefio. 
Menendez  y  Pelayo :  Calderon  (Revista  de  Archivos). 


116 


HOlfOR   CODfiSE    IN   MODERN  LITERATU&K. 


English, 


French, 


Geiihan, 


Italian, 


Spanish,  , 


Trinity  Examination. 

Marlowe :  Edward  II. 

Shakespeare  :  Richard  II. 

Byron:  Matthew  Arnold's  selection  (Macmillan). 

Slielley  :   Stopford  Brooke's  selection. 

Keats  :  Lamia  ;  Eve  of  St.  Agnes. 

Essays  of  Elia  (First  Series). 

Corneille :    La  Galerie  dii    Palais    (Manchester),    Don 

Sanche,  Pertliarite,  Pnlcherie. 
Racine  :  Berenice,  Phedre,  Athalie. 
Lanson  :   [nt  mpra).  Part  iv. 
Hanotaux  :  La  France  en  161<1  (Neison). 


Robertson :    History  of  German   Literature, 

Chaps,  iii.  to  viii.  (inclusive). 
Schiller  :  Die  Rauber. 
Goethe  :  Faust,  I.  Teil. 
Wright :  Old  High  German  Primer. 

Dante :  Purgatorio. 
Petrarca  :  I  Trionfi. 
Sannazaro  :  L'Aicadia. 
Torraca  :  Jacopo  Sannazaro. 

Lope  de  Vega  :  La  Moza  de  C^ntaro. 
Garcilaso  de  la  Vega  :  Obras 


Part 


Michaelmas  Examination. 

English,       .     Shakespeare:  Othello;  A  Winter's  Tale. 

Tennyson  :  In  Menioriam ;  The  Princess  ;  Maud  ;  and 

the  poems  comprised  in  pp.    27-103  of  Macmillan'a 

one-volume  edition  of  Tennyson. 
Browning  :  Men  and  Women. 
Carlyle  :  Past  and  Present. 

French,        .     Moliere :  La  Princesse   d'Elide,  Les   Aniants    magni- 
fiques.  La  Comtesse  d'Escarbagnas. 
Mariviiux  :  Le  Prince  travesti. 
La   Chan^un    de   Willame    (Oxford  University   Press, 

American  Branch). 
Lanson ;   {ut  supra)  Part  v. 

German,       .     Robertson :  History  of  German  Literature.     Parts  ii. 
and  iii. 
Goethe:  Faust,  II.  Teil. 
Schiller  :  Die  Braut  von  Messina. 
Der  Nibelunge  Not  (Sammlung  Goschen  1). 
Wright :  Middle  High  German  Primer. 


UONOK  CODRSE   IN    MODEBN   LITERAXUKE.  117 

Italian,  •     .     Dante :  Paradiso. 
Tasso  :  L'Aminta. 
Guarini :  II  Pastor  fi do. 
Carducci :  Saggi  sul  Tasso. 

Spanish,  .     .     Tellez  :  Don  Gil  de  las  Calzas  verdes. 

R.  Menendez  Pidal :  Antologia  de  Prosistas  castellanos 
(Revista  de  Filologia  espanola). 

Subjects  for  English  Essays  will  be  proposed  at  each  Examina- 
tion. The  proficiency  of  Candidates  in  the  other  languages  will 
be  tested  by  oral  Examination,  as  well  as  by  written  versions 
from  English,  and  Compositions  in  the  language  selected  by  each 
Candidate. 


§  VIII. — Legal  and  Political  Science. 

Honor  Examinations  are  held  in  the  Hilary  and  Trinity  Terms  of 
the  JuTiior  and  Senior  Sophister  Years,  and  a  Prize  Examination  in  the 
Michaelmas  Term  of  the  Junior  Sophister  Year. 

Candidates  for  Honors  in  Trinity  Term  are  liable  for  the  Course  of 
the  preceding  Term,  and  candidates  in  Michaelmas  Term  are  liable  for 
the  Courses  of  the  two  preceding  Terms. 


Junior  Sophisters. 

HILARY  EXAMINATION. 

Jurisprudence. 

The  scope  and  methods  of  Jurisprudence. 
The  elements  of  analytical  Jurisprudence. 

[Holland,  Elements  of  Jurisprudence,  chaps.  1-10  ;  Pollock, 
First  Book  of  Jurisprudence,  Pt.  I.] 

Roman  Law. 

History  of  Roman  Law  :  the  Law  of  Persons. 

[Justinian,  Institutes,   Bk.  i.  (edited  Moyle,  with   Intro- 
duction) ;  Sohm,  Institutes  of  Roman  Law.] 

Constitutional  History. 
[Maitland,  The  Constitutional  History  of  England.] 

Political  and  Economic  Science. 

Scope  and  Method   of  Economics  ;  Theory  of  Production  and 
Exchange. 

[Taussig,  Principles  of  Economics,  Books  1,  2,  3.] 


118  HONOR  COUKSE   IN  LEGAL   AND   POLITICAL  SCIENCE. 

TRINITY  EXAMINATION. 

International  Law. 

Sources  and  History  of  International  Law  ;    the  Relations  of 
States  in  Peace. 

[Lawrence,  Principles  of  International  Law,  parts  I.  and  II. ; 
Westlake,  International  Law,  Pt.  I.,  Peace.] 

Roman  Law. 

The  Law  of  Property  and  Inheritance. 

[Justinian,   Institutes,   Book    ii.,    Book    in.,   Titles   1-12  ; 
Sohm,  Institutes.] 

Constitutional  Law  and  History. 

[Dicey,  Law  of  the  Constitution  (latest  edition),  with  the 
Texts  of  Magna  Charta,  The  Petition  of  Right,  and  The 
Bill  of  Rights.] 

Political  and  Economic  Science. 

The  Theory  of  Distrihution  and  Consumption. 
[Taussig,  Principles  of  Economics,  Book  6.] 


MICHAELMAS  EXAMINATION. 

International  Law. 

International  Disputes  :  Belligerency  :  Neutrality. 

[Lawrence,  Principles,  Parts  in.  and  iv. ;    Westlake,  Inter- 
national Law,  Part  ii.,  War.] 

Roman  Law. 

The  Law  of  Obligations  and  Actions. 

[Justinian,  Institutes,  Book  in.,  Titles  13  to  end,  Book  it.  ; 
Sohm,  Institutes.] 

English  Law. 

(a)  Law  of  Property. 

[Strahan  and  Baxter,  General  View  of  the  Law  of  Property.] 

(b)  Law  of  Evidence. 

[Stephen,  Digest  of  the  Law  of  Evidence.] 


nOKOR  CODRSK  IN  LEGAL  AND  POLITICAL  SCIENCE.  119 


Political  and  Economic  Science. 

The  economic  functions  of  government. 
The  t)ieory  of  taxation  and  public  debts. 

[Sidgwick,  Elements  of  Politics,  Part  i. ;  Taussig,  Prim  iples 

of  Economics,  Bk.  viii. ;  J.  S.  Mill,  Principles  of  Political 

Economy,  Bk.  v.] 


Senior  Sophisters. 

HILARY  EXAMINATION. 

Jurisprudence. 

As  in  Junior   Sophister  Year,   together  with  the  elements  of 
historical  and  comparative  Jurisprudence. 

[Maine,  Ancient  Law,  Early  Law  and  Custom  ;  Holland, 
Elements  of  Jurisprudence,  cliaps.  11-18;  Pollock,  First 
Book  of  Jurisprudence,  Part  ii.] 

English  Law. 

[a)  Real  Property,  as   in  Junior  Sophister  Michaelmas  Examin- 

ation, together  with  the  work  of  the  ordinary  Law  Lectures  in 
Michaelmas  Term.  Equity :  The  origin  and  development  of 
the  Court  of  Chanceiy  ;  the  general  principles  of  Equity  ; 
the  Law  of  Trusts. 

[Strahan  and  Kenrick,  Digest  of  Equity;  H.  A.  Smith, 
Principles  of  Equity.] 

(b)  Law  of  Contract. 

[Anson,  Principles  of  the  English  Law  of  Contract.] 

Political  and  Economic  Science. 
As  in  Junior  Sophister  Year. 


TRINITY  EXAMINATION. 
English  Law. 

(a)  Real  Property  ;   the  work  of  the  ordinary  Lectures  of  Hilary 

Term.  Equity  :  the  doctrines  of  Election,  Conversion,  Satis- 
faction, and  Performance ;  Equitable  relief  on  grounds  of  Fraud, 
Misrepresentation,  and  Mistake  ;  Equitable  Remedies. 

[Strahan  and  Kenrick,   Digest  of  Equity ;    H.  A.  Smith, 
Principles  of  Equity.] 

(b)  The  Law  of  Torts. 

[Pollock,  Law  of  Torts.] 


120  HONOE  COURSE  IN  LEGAL  AND  POLITICAL  SCIENCE. 

Political  and  Economic  Science. 

The  History  of  Political  and  Economic  Theories. 

[Pollock,  History  of  the  Science  of  Politics ;  Ingram,  History 
of  Political  Economy  ;  Dunning,  History  of  Political 
Theories.] 

N.B. — The  books  mentioned  within  brackets  in  the  above  Courses  are 
intended  to  show  the  scope  of  the  examinations,  and  the  standard  of 
attainment  expected  from  candidates. 

§IX.  Celtic  Languages. 

Prize  Examinations  in  Old  and  Middle  Irish  are  held  in  the 
Michaelmas  Term  of  the  Junior  and  Senior  Freshman  Years, 
and  a  Prize  Examination  in  Celtic  Languages  in  the  Michaelmas 
Term  of  the  Junior  Sophister  year.  The  following  Courses  have 
been  appointed : — 

JUNIOR   FRESHMAN    YEAR. 

(rt)  Texts— 

Strachan  :  Selections  from  the  O.-Ir.  Glosses. 

Scela  na  Esergi. 

Da  Bron  Flatha  Nime. 

Strachan,  "  Stories  from  the  Taj«." 

(J)  Grammar. 

(c)  Joyce :  Names  of  Places,  First  Series. 

SENIOR   FRESHMAN    YEAR. 

{a]  Texts— 

[mram  M^iled6in. 

Seel  Muicce  maic  D&tho  and  Echtra  Chondla. 

Tain  Bo  Fraich. 

The  "Wiirzburg  Glosses,  Epistle  to  the  Komans. 

{b)  Grammar. 

(c)  Joyce :  Smaller  Social  History  of  Ancient  Ireland. 

JUNIOR   SOPHISTER   YEAR. 

(rt)  Texts — 

Tochmarc  Etaine. 

The  Wiirzburg  Glosses,  Epistles  to  the  Corinthians,  Galatians, 

and  Ephesians. 
Bruden  Dk  Derga. 

(b)  Grammar  of  Early  Irish  and  Early  "Welsh.     Thurneysen's  and 

Strachan's  handbooks  are  recommended. 

(c)  J.  MacNeill :  Phases  of  Irish  History. 
{d)  Welsh :  Peredur  ab  Efrawe. 


(  1^1  ) 


In  the  Michaelmas  Term  of  the  fifth,  or  Candidate  Bachelor, 
year,  the  B.A.  Degree  Examination  includes  Examinations  for 
Moderatorships  in  each  of  the  following  subjects: — 

1.  Mathematics. 

2.  Classics. 

3.  Mental  and  Moral  Philosophy. 

4.  Experimental  Science. 
•5.  Natural  Science. 

6.  History  and  Political  Science. 

7.  Modern  Literature. 

8.  Legal  and  Political  Science. 

9.  Engineering  Science. 

10.  Celtic  Languages. 

1 1 .  Oriental  Languages. 

The  Course  appointed  for  Examination  in  each  of  these  subjects 
is  as  follows : — 

MODERATORSHIPS  IN  MATHEMATICS. 

The  Course  for  Moderatorships  is  the  same  as  the  Honor  Course 
in  Mathematics. 

I^otice  of  Candidature  must  be  given  to  the  Senior  Lecturer 
on  or  before  June  15th. 


MODERATORSHIPS  IN  CLASSICS. 

This  Course  consists  of  two  parts — one  general,  the  other  variable. 
Candidates  will  be  critically  examined  in  a  Special  Course. 

Special  Course. 

GuKEK, .     .     Pindar,  Pythian  Odes. 
Aristophanes,  Frogs. 

Bucolici  Graeci  (Oxford  text  of  Wilamowitz,  pp.  1-120, 
omitting  Theocritus  II,  IV,  V,  XII,  XVIII,  XXVII, 
XXIX,  XXX,  and  the  epigrams). 
Latin,  .     .    Virgil,  Georgics. 
Propertius. 
Pliny's  Letters,  Books  iii-vii  (inclusive). 

Passages  will  be  set  for  translation,  selected  from  the  Greek 
and  Latin  classical  authors  generally.  Candid.ates  will  be  further 
examined  in  the  higher  Greek  and  Latin  Grammar  and  Criticism, 
in  the  Political  and  Literary  Histories  of  Greece  and  Rome,  in 
Greek  and  Latin  Composition,  and  in  Comparative  Philology. 


122  MODERATOESHIPS   IN   CLASSICS. 

Course  in  Comparative  Philology : — 

Edmond's  Comparative  Philology,   and  the  Lectures    of    the 
Professor. 

Course  in  History  and  Literature: — 

Holm,      .     .     .     History  of  Greece,  Vols,  i.,  ii.,  and  iii. 

Mahaffy,      .     .     History  of  Greek  Literature. 

MoMMSEN,      .     .     History  of  Rome,  Booki.,  chaps.  12-15;  Book  ii., 

chaps.  8   and   9  ;    Book   iii.,    chaps.    12-14  ; 

Book IV.,  chaps.  12  and  13;  Book  v.,  chap.  12. 
How  AND  Leigh,     History  of  Rome. 
Bury,    ....     Student's  Roman  Empire,  chaps.  1-25. 
Tyruell,        .     .     Latin  Poetry,  chaps.  1-8. 

Together  with  the  lectures  of  the  Professor  of  Ancient  History  and 
Classical  Archaeology  in  Ancient  History  and  Classical  Archaeology 
during  the  two  academic  years  preceding  each  examination. 

The  subjects  for  Essays  will  be  chosen  from  the  above  Course. 

The  numbers  assigned  as  marks  to  the  various  subjects  of 
Examination  will  be  as  follows : — 


Four  Papers  of  Passages,  .  . 
Four  Compositions,  .... 
S-peci&\  Course  (viva  voce) ,  .  . 
Higher  Grammar  and  Criticism, 

Philology, 

History  and  Literature,    .     .     . 


Marks. 
80 
60 
60 
25 
25 
50 

300 


The  arrangement  of  the  Examination  will  be  as  follows  :- 
9.30  a.m.  to  12.30  p.m. — 1st  day,  Greek  Prose  Passages.     2nd  day, 
Greek  Verse  Passages.     3rd  day,  Latin  Prose  Passages.     4th  day,  Latin 
Verse  Passages. 

2  p.m.  to  5  p.m. — 1st  day,  Greek  Prose  Composition  (one  hour  and 
a-half),  Greek  Verse  Composition  (one  hour  and  a-half).  2nd  day, 
Latin  Prose  Composition  (one  hour  and  a-half),  Latin  Verse  Composi- 
tion (one  hour  and  a-half).  3rd  day.  Higher  Grammar  and  Criticism 
(one  hour  and  a-half),  Paper  in  Philology  (one  hour  and  a-half). 
4th  day,  Paper  in  History  and  I/iterature. 

Notice  of  Candidature  must  be  given  to  the  Senior  Lecturer,  on  or 
before  June  15th. 


MODERATORSHIPS    IN    MENTAL   AND    MORAL 
PHILOSOPHY. 

T.  Every  Candidate  will  be  examined — 

(«)  On  his  general  knowledge  of  the  history  and  problems  of 
philosophy  (24  marks). 
(Note  :  a  knowledge  of  recent  philosophy  will  be  expected.) 


MODEEA.TOESHIPS  IN   MENTAL   AND   MOBAL   PHILOSOPHY.      123 

(J)  On  a  special  work  to  be  selected  annually   by  the   Honor 
Examiners     and    the     Professor    of    Moral    Philosophy 
(10  marks). 
Special  Works  for  1923: — Alexander,  Space,  Time,  and  Leity. 
(c)  On  the  following  compulsory  course  (36  marks) : — 
Plato's  Republic. 
Aristotle's  Ethics. 

Hume's  Enquiry  Concerning  Human  Understanding. 
Kant's  Critique  of  the  Pure  Eeason. 

Kant's  Fundamental  Principles  of  the  Metaphysic  of  Morals. 
Hegel's  Subjective  Logic,  Introductory  Chapters  and  Section  1. 
Hotfding's  Psychology. 
Bergson's  Creative  Evolution. 
II.  Every  Candidate  shall  present  for  examination  any  two  of 
the  following  Courses: — A,  B,  C,  D,  E,  F  (15  marks  each),  or 
Course  G  (30  marks),  and  shall  give  notice  of  his  choice  to  the 
Professor  of  Moral  Philosophy  before  the  20th  of  June  preceding 
his  examination. 

A. 

Greek   Pre-Socratic    and  Platonic    Philosophy. — Course    of    reading 
recommended : — 

Ritter  and  Preller's  Historia  Philosophiae  Oraecae,  to  the  end  of 
the  Academia  Vetus. 

B. 

The  Aristotelian,  Later  Greek,  and  Mediaeval  Philosophy. —  Course  of 
reading  recommended: — 

Ritter  and  Preller's  Historia  Philosophiae  Graecae,  Aristoteles 

eiusque    discipuli,    Sceptici    antiquiores,   Academici    nov. 

Sceptici  recentiores,  Philo  Judaeus,  Neoplatonici. 
Wulf's  History  of  Mediaeval  Philosophy,  Patristic  Philosophy, 

and  Mediaeval  Philosophy  to  the  middle  of  the  fifteenth 

century. 

C. 

Modern    Pre-Kantian    Intel lectualism. — Course   of  reading  recom- 
mended : — 

Leibniz'  Monadology  and  New  System  (with  Explanations), 
Spinoza's  Ethics,  Books  i  and  ii. 
Descartes'  Meditations. 

D. 

Empirical  Philosophy. — Course  of  reading  recommended  : — 

Locke's  Essay  Concerning  Human  Understanding,  Books  ii  and  It 

Berkeley's  Principles  of  Human  Knowledge. 

James's  Pragmatism  and  Pluralistic  Universe. 
E. 
The  Philosophy  of  Kant  .—Course  of  reading  recommended : — 

Want's  Critique  of  Judgment. 

F. 

The  Philosophy  of  Hegel. — Course  ojf  reading  recommended : — 
Hegel's  Logic  (Part  i  of  'B.QgeV&'iEncyclopedia). 
e2 


124     MODEKATOESHIPS   IN   MENTAL  AND   MOUAL   PHILOSOPHY. 

G. 

Ancient  and  Modern  Ethics. — Course  of  reading  recommended  : — 

Zeller's  Stoics  and  Epicureans,  Chaps,  x-xii,  xiv,  xix-xxi. 

Spinoza's  Ethics,  Books  iii,  iv,  and  v. 

Butler's  Sermons  and  Nature  of  Virtue. 

Kant's  Critique  of  the  Practical  Reason. 

Spencer's  Data  of  Ethics. 

Sorley's  Ethics  of  Naturalism. 

Green's  Prolegomena  to  Ethics,  Books  iii,  iv,  and  v. 

Seth's  Ethical  Principles,  Introduction. 

Notice  of  Candidature,  with  Special  Courses  chosen,  must  be  given 
to  the  Senior  Lecturer  on  or  before  June  loth. 


MODERATORSHIPS  IN  EXPERIMENTAL  SCIENCE. 

The  subjects  of  Examination  f or  Moderatorships  in  Experimental 
Science,  and  the  relative  weights  to  be  attached  to  the  different 
subjects,  are  as  follows: — 

Marks. 

(1)  General  Paper  in  Physics, 100 

(2)  Either  General  Paper  in  Physics,  or  General  Paper 

in  Chemistry,  .         .         .         .         .         .100 

(3)  Either  Special  Paper  in  Physics,  or  Special  Paper 

in  Chemistry, 100 

(4)  General  Paper  in  Chemistry,         ....  100 

(5)  Essays  in  Physical  subjects,          ....  50 

(6)  Essays  in  Chemical  subjects,         ....  50 

(7)  Practical  Examination  in  Physics,         ...  50 

(8)  Practical  Examination  in  Chemistry,    ...  50 

(9)  Practical  work  during  Sophister  years,  either  300 

marks  in  Physics,  and    100   in  Chemistry,  or 

300  in  Chemistry,  and  100  in  Physics,      .         .     400 

The  Course  in  each  subject  consists  of  the  Honor  Courses 
of  the  Freshman  and  Sophister  Years,  together  with  a  Special 
Course  and  a  Special  Investigation.  A  Special  Course  in 
Physics  is  appointed  which,  until  further  notice,  will  be  Current 
Electricity. 

In  Chemistry  a  student  is  allowed,  at  the  commencement  of  his 
Senior  Sophister  year,  to  select  either  Inorganic,  Organic,  or 
Physical  Chemistry  as  his  Special  Course. 

Candidates  are  not  required  to  answer  in  the  Special  Courses  in 
both  Experimental  Physics  and  Chemistry,  or  to  undertake 
research  in  both  branches. 

In  order  to  qualify  for  a  Gold  Medal,  candidates  must  obtain  not 
less  than  35  per  cent,  in  the  secondary  subject  they  have  taken. 

Notice  of  Candidature,  with  Special  Courses  chosen,  must  be 
given  to  the  Senior  Lecturer,  on  or  before  June  15th. 


MODERATOESHrPS  IN   NATURAL   SCIENCE.  125 

MODERATORSHIPS  IN  NATURAL  SCIENCE. 

Two  Courses  of  study  (A)  or  (B)  are  detiued  as  suitable  for  this 
Examination  ;  one  of  these  Courses  (B)  is  specially  adapted  to  the 
requirements  of  Medical  Students. 

(A.) 

The  Course  for  Natural  Science  Moderatorship  (A)  embraces  the 
three  subjects,  Botanj-,  Geology,  and  Zoology.  In  the  Examina- 
tion the  candidate  will  be  marked  both  on  the  practical  work  in 
tlie  University  Laboratories  and  on  his  answering  upon  the  Text- 
books prescribed  for  the  Honor  Courses,  and  upon  the  lectures 
and  demonstrations. 

The  Candidate  must  select  one  of  the  three  subjects  for  more 
advanced  study.  The  marks  will  be  allocated  as  follows : — 
500  marks  to  the  selected  subject,  and  250  marks  to  each  of  the 
other  subjects.  A  more  advanced  paper  will  be  set,  and  additional 
practical  work  will  be  required,  in  the  selected  subject. 

At  the  Commencement  of  his  Senior  Sopliister  year  the  Candi- 
date should  consult  the  Professor  in  whose  subject  he  desires  to 
specialize  as  to  the  Course  lie  should  pursue,  and  as  to  the 
practical  investigation  he  sliould  undertake. 

Notice  of  Candidature  must  be  given  to  the  Senior  Lecturer  on 
or  before  June  25.  When  giving  notice  the  Candidate  must  state 
wliich  one  of  the  Courses  he  selects  for  more  advanced  study. 

(B.) 

The  subjects  of  the  examination  in  (B)  are  divided  into  two 
groups : — 


I. 

Chemistry. 

Experimental  Physics. 

Botany. 

Zoology,  including  Parasitology. 


II. 

Anatomy,  including  Embryology. 
Physiology    (Experimental     and 

Chemical)  and  Histology. 
Pathology  and  Bacteriology. 


Candidates  must  present  tliemselves  in  two  subjects,  a  primary 
and  a  secondary  subject.  They  must  choose  a  subject  in  Group  II 
as  a  primary  subject ;  they  may  clioose  as  a  secondary  subject 
a  subject  in  either  group. 

The  marks  shall  be  allotted  as  follows : — 

Primary  subject,  700. 
Secondary  subject,  300. 

In  order  to  quality  for  a  Senior  Moderatorship  a  candidate 
must  obtain  at  least  '65  per  cent,  in  the  secondary  subject. 

The  Courses  in  the  subjects  of  Group  I  are  arranged  with  a 
view  to  the  requirements  of  Medical  Science. 


126  m0derat0k8hips  in  natttral  science. 

Chemistry. 
Inorganic. 

The  subjects  of  the  Honor  Course  up  to  the  end  of  the  Junior 
Sophister  year. 

Physical. 

The  Course  as  covered  by  the  Lectures  given  in  the  Junior  and 
Senior  Sophister  years. 

Organic. 

The  subjects  of  the  Honor  Course  up  to  the  end  of  the  Junior 
Sophister  year. 

Special  Note — A  knowledge  of  those  portions  of  the  subject 
which  bear  most  directly  on  Medical  Science  will  be  specially 
required,  and  the  greatest  importance  will  be  attached  to  Organic 
Chemistry. 

Practical. 

Qualitative  analysis,  inorganic  and  organic.  Volumetric 
analysis.  Candidates  will  be  required  to  complete  six  quanti- 
tative problems,  the  results  of  which  are  to  be  recorded  in  a  note- 
book to  be  handed  in  at  the  examination. 

Books  recommended. 
Mellor's  Inorganic  Cliemistiy. 
Senter's  Outlines  of  Physical  Chemistry. 
Findlay's  Physical  Chemistry. 

Walker's  Organic  Chemistry  for  Students  of  Medicine. 
Meyer's  Determination  of  Radicals  in  Carbon  Compounds. 

ICXPERIMENTAL   PllYSICS. 

The  Honor  Courses  in  Kxperimental  Physics  for  the  Freshmen 
and  Junior  Sophister  years,  with  the  elementary  theory  of  polar- 
ized light. 

BoxANr. 

1.  Course  in  Botany  for  the  Preliminary  Scientific  Medical 
Examination. 

2.  Course  in  Botany  for  the  Senior  Freshman  Prize  Kxamination. 

3.  Short  Practical  Course  (about  30  hours)  in  General  Plant 
Pliysiology. 

Books  recommended. 
Text- book  of  Botany  by  Coulter,  Barnes,  and  Cowles. 

Or,— 
Text-book  of  Botany  by  Strasburger,  Scheiick,  Noll,  and  Schimper. 
Principles  of  General  Physiology,  by  Bayliss. 
Practical  Plant  Biology,  by  H.  H.  Dixon. 


m0berat0esh1p8  in  natttkal  science.  127 

Zoology. 

1.  The  (.'curse  for  Preliminary  Scientific  Medical  Examination. 

2.  Three  terras  Modei'atorship  Lectures. 

3.  A  Course  in  Parasitology. 

Books  recommended. 

Zoology  for  Medical  Students,  by  Graham  Kerr. 
Tropical  Diseases,  by  Manson-Bahr. 


Anatomy. 

The  anatomy  of  Man. 

The  embryonic  history  of  Man. 

The  ancestral  history  of  Man,  as  far  as  it  may  be  inferred  from 
a  study  of  his  anatomy  and  embryonic  development. 

Comparison  of  the  anatomy  oi  Man— as  the  most  specialized 
Mammal — with  that  of  the  lower  Mammalia  and  more  primitive 
Vertebrates. 

Anatomical  methods  of  investigation. 

Text-books:  as  recommended  by  the  Professor  of  Anatomy. 

Anatomy. 
{As  a  secondm'y  suhjecl.) 

The  anatomy  of  Man. 

The  early  embryonic  history  of  Man,  including  a  knowledge  of 
the  mode  of  origin  of  the  skeleton  and  its  muscles,  of  the 
vascular,  nervous,  digestive,  respiratory,  excretory,  and  repro- 
ductive systems. 

PHySlOLOGY. 

The  princi[)les  of  General  Physiology,  including  chemical  and 
physical  properties  of  living  tissues. 

The  Physiology,  Histology,  and  Biochemistry  of  the  Human 
Body,  including  the  Central  Nervous  System. 

Modern  Physiological  Methods  of  Investigation. 

Laboratory  Courses  in  Experimental  Physiology,  Histology, 
and  Biochemistry  are  arranged  by  the  Department. 

In  addition  to  the  ordinary  Winter  and  Summer  Courses  in  the 
above  subjects,  Special  Courses  will  be  given  throughout  the 
Winter  and  Summer  terms.  A  subject  will  be  selected  from 
these  courses  to  which  the  candidates  who  select  Physiology  as 
their  Primary  Subject  will  be  required  to  devote  special  attention. 
These  candidates  may  also  be  required  to  carry  out  elementary 
research  work  in  connexion  with  the  Special  Courses. 

lext-books:  as  recommended  by  the  Professor  of  Physiology. 


128  modehatorships  in  natural  science. 

Pathology  and  Bactekiology. 

1.  General  Pathologj-.    Anomalies  of  growth  and  development. 
Disturbances  of  circulation  and  nutrition.     Pathology  of  the 

blood.     Inflammation.     Tumours. 

2.  Morbid  Anatomy  of  the  tissues,  naked-eye  and  raicroseopic. 
Methods  used  in  Pathological  Histology,  including  Microchemical 
Methods, 

3.  Pathological  Chemistry.  Qualitative  and  quantitative 
analysis  of  morbid  products. 

4.  Hacteriology.  Methods  of  cultivating,  isolating,  and 
examining  micro-organisms.  Study  of  the  characteristics  of 
various  forms  of  Bacteria.  Metbods  of  quantitative  Bacterio- 
logical analysis.  Applications  of  Bacteriology  to  Clinical 
Medicine.     Infection  and  Immunity. 

A  subject  will  be  selected  each  year  from  the  above  Course,  to 
which  the  candidates  who  select  Pathology  and  Bacteriology  as  a 
Primary  Subject  will  be  expected  to  devote  special  attention. 

In  addition  to  the  ordinary  Winter  and  Summer  Courses  in 
Pathology  and  Bacteriology,  two  Practical  Courses  will  be  given 
in  the  Pathological  Laboratory,  viz. : — 

1.  A  Course  of  two  mouths  in  Practical  Hacteriology  in  the 
Winter  Session. 

2.  A  Course  of  three  months  in  Microscopy  and  Pathological 
Chemistry  in  the  Summer  Session. 


MODERATORSHIPS  IN  HISTOEY  AND  POLITICAL  SCIENCE. 

[Candidates  will  take  notice  that  there  may  be  passages  set  in 
Latin,  French,  and  German  for  translation  and  comment.] 

The  Moderatorship  Examination  in  History  and  Political 
Science  consists  of  two  alternative  Courses,  in  either  of  which  a 
Moderatorship  can  be  obtained  : — 

A. — Ancient  History  and  Political  Science. 
B.— Modern  History  and  Political  Science. 

A.— Ancient  History  and  Political  Science. 
1.  Genkkai,  HisTOKV.     (1  Paper.)  150  marks. 

Greek  and  Roman  History  during  the  periods  covered  by  Holm's 
History  of  Greece,  Mommseii's  History  of  Rome,  and  Bury's 
Student's  Roman  Empire. 


i 


moderajorships  in  history  and  political  science.    129 

2.  Special  Pkkiods  of  Greek  and  Roman  History  with 
Okiginal  Autoorities.     (2  Papers.)  350  marks. 

(a)  From  the  Thirty  Years'  Peace  to  the  Archonship  of  Eucleides 

(445-403  B.C.). 
[Candidates  must  make  themselves  specially  familiar  with  the 
texts  of  Thucydides  and  XeTiophon  (Hellenica,  i,  ii),  and  are 
recommended  to  u.se  Holm's  History  of  Greece,  Hill's 
Sources  for  Greek  Histovy,  and  Hicks  and  Hill's  Greek 
Historical  Inscriptions. 

(b)  The  Jiclio-Clandxan  Empire  (31  B.C.  to  68  a.d.). 
[Candidates  mnst  make  themselves  specially  familiar  with  the 

text  of  Tacitus'  Annals,  and  should  consult  the  introductory 
chapters  of  Fiirneaux's  edition  (vols,  i,  ii).  They  are  also 
recommended  to  use  Rushforth's  Latin  Historical  Inscrip- 
tions, and  Arnold's  Roman  Provincial  Administration. 

3.  Constitutional  History.     (2  Papers.)  200  marks. 
Text  of  the  Treatise  'Aflrji'otau'  ■KoKirtia. 

Gilbert  (G),  The  Constitutional  Antiquities  of  Sparta  and  Athens. 
Greenidge  (A.  H.  J.),  Roman  Public  Life. 

4.  Political  Science.    (1  Paper.)  100  marks. 

Aristotle's  Politics. 

Freeman's  Comparative  Politics. 

5.  Economic  History.     (1  Paper.)  100  marks. 
The  Outlines  of  Ancient  Economic  History. 

The  following  books  are  recommended : — 

Cunningham   (W.),   Western    Civilization    in    its    Economic 

Aspects.     Part  I.  (Ancient  Times). 
Francotte  (H.),  L'Industrie  dans  la  Grece  nncienne.    Book  i., 

chaps.   1,    2,  4,  6,  7 ;    Book  ii.,   chaps.  2,  7 ;    Book  iii., 

chap.  4 ;    Book  iv.,  chaps.  4,  5. 
Mommsen's   Roman   History  (the  portions  in  the  following 

chapters  which  deal  with  Economics: — Book  i.,  chap.  13; 

Book  II.,  chap.  8  ;  Book  in.,  chap.  12  ;  Book  iv.,  chap.  11 ; 

Book  v.,  chap.  11). 
Levasseur  (E.),  Histoire  des  classes  ouvriferes,  Book  i. 

6.  Greek  AND  Latin  Epigkaphy.     (1  Paper.)  100  marks. 
[Candidates  to  consult  the  Professor  of  Ancient  History  for  particulars.] 

B.— Modem  History  and  Political  Science. 

1.  General  Mkdiakval   and   Modern    European   History 
(476-1878).     (1  Paper.)  125  marks. 

[Candidates  are  referred  to  the  volumes  of  Rivingtons' 
"  Periods  of  European  History,"  and  other  books  pre- 
scribed for  the  Honor  Courses.] 

o3 


130      MODEKATOUSUIPS  IN   HISTOKY   AND   POLITICAL  SCIENCE. 

2.  Special  Pkkiod  of  Modioun  Hisioky.    (2  Papers.) 

300  marks. 

The  French  Revolution  :  its  history,  causes,  and  antecedents. 
The  following  books  are  specially  prescribed  : 

Morse  Stephens, .  Orators  of  the  French  Revolution  (omitting  in 
vol^ii  Barere  iv-xi  incl.  and  Baiidin). 

Arthur  Young,    .   2Vrtw/«  i«  i^rawctf  (ed.  Betham  Edwards). 
The  following  books  are  recommended,  but  not  as  compulsory 
subjects  of  study : 

Morse  Stephens, .   The  French  Revolution. 

Aulard.  .   The  French  Revolution  (ed.  Miall). 

Lavisse,  .  Histoire  de  France,  vol.  ix. 

Morse  Stephens, .  Revolutionary  Europe. 

The  Cambridge  Modern  History,  vol.  viii. 

Taine,  .  L'Ancien  Regime, 

De  Tocqueville,  .  L'Aticien  Regime  et  la  Revolution  J'rani;<tiie. 

Burke,  .  Reflections  on  the  French  Revolution. 

Acton,  .  Lectures  on  the  French  Revolution. 

Mahan,  .  Influence  of  Sea-power  upon  the  French  Revo- 

lution, vol.  I. 

Morley,  .  Rousseau. 

Morley,  .  Voltaire. 

Sorel,  .  V Europe  et  la  Revolution  franfaise,  tome  i, 

livre  i. 

3.  Constitutional  History.     (1  Paper.)  100  marks. 

English  Constitutional  Histouy,  to  1832. 

[Candidates  are  referred  to  the  books  recommended  for  the 
Honor  Examinations  in  English  Constitutional  History, 
in  the  Junior  Sophister  year.] 

A   knowledge  of  the  text  of  tlie  following  documents  will  be 
required : 

The  Charter  of  Liberties  of  The  Bill  of  Rights. 

Henry  I.  The  Act  of  Settlement. 

The  Constitutions  of  Clarendon.  The    Act     of     Union     between 

Magna  Carta.  England  and  Scotland. 

Coiiflrmatio  Cartarum.  The  Act  of  Union  between  Great 

The  Petition  of  Right.  Britain  and  Ireland. 

The  Instrument  of  Government.  The  Reform  Act  of  1832. 

4.  Political  Sciknck.    (1  Paper.)  100  marks. 

Bluntschli's  Theory  of  the  State. 

Egerton's  Federations  and  Unions  in  the  British  Empire. 
Sidgwick's  Development  of  European  Polity. 
A.  L.  Lowell's  Governments  and  Parties  in  Continental 
Europe. 


4 


iiODKKATOKSUIPS   IN    IIISTOKY   AND    POLITICAL   SCIENCE       l31 

5.  Economic  HisToity.     (I  Paper.)  125  marks. 
English  Economic  Ilistory  ; — 

Meredith,  .  Economic  Ilistory  of  England. 

Unwiii,  .  Industrial  Organization. 

Seebohm,  .  English  Village  Communityi. 

Webb,  .  Ilistory  of  'Trade  Unionism. 

Johnson,  ,  The  Lisappearance  of  the  Small  Landowner i 

Asliley,  .  English  Economic  Ilistory. 

Rand,  .  Selections     illustrating     Economic    Historyi 
Chiips.  2,  5,  6,  9,   10,  18,  22. 

6.  English  and  Ikisu  IIisioky  (449-1837  a.d.).    (2  Tapers.) 

250  marks. 

(A  Paper  will  be  set  in  each  of  tliese  subjects.  Candidates  are 
referred  to  the  books  recommended  for  the  Ilonor  Examina- 
tions in  Englisli  and  Irish  History  in  the  Kreshiuan  years.) 


MODERATORSHIPS  IN  MODERN  LITERATURE. 

The  subjects  of  Examination  are  : — 

I.  English  Language  and  Literature. 

II.  French  Language  and  Literature. 

III.  German  Language  and  i,iiorature. 

IV.  Italian  Language  and  Literature. 
V.  Spanish  Language  and  Literature. 

The  languages  in  which  the  candidates  have  competed  will  be  noted 
(m  tlie  returns  sent  in  by  the  Examiners,  and  «n  the  medals  awirdi  d. 
The  caiuiidates  taking  two  foreign  languages  will  be  required  to  sliow 
their  competence  in  English  Composition.  For  that  purpose  subjects 
for  English  Essay  will  be  proposed  to  them. 

All  caiuiidates  m\ist  present  themselves  in  any  two,  and  two  only, 
of  the  Sections,  English  Language  and  Literature,  French  Language 
and  Literature,  German  Language  and  Literature.  Italian  Language  and 
Literature,  Spanish  Limguage  and  Literature.  They  must  inform  the 
Senior  Lecturer  before  the  end  of  Trinity  Term  in  what  two  sections 
they  intend  to  compete. 

The  proficiency  of  candidates  will  be  tested  by  papers  an<i  oral 
Examination,  as  well  as  by  Composition  in  the  languages  which  they 
have  chosen. 

The  Courses  in  the  several  Departments  are  as  follows  : — 
I. — English  Language  and  Literature. 

The  History  of  English  Literature  :  based  upon  the  study  of  such 
works  as  Courthope's  History  of  English  Poetry  (6  vols., 
Macmillan),  and  the  more  important  authois  in  the  five  vols,  of 
Craik's  English  Prose  Selections. 


132  MODERAtOESHlPS  IN  MODERN  LITEEATDRE. 

Literary  Criticism :  as  represented  by — 

Aristotle's  Poetics  :  English  translation. 
Sidney:  Apology  of  Poetry. 

Dryden  :  Essay  of  Dramatic  Poesy  ;  Preface  to  the  Fables. 
Addison  :  Critical  Essays  from  the  Spectator. 
Johnson  :  Lives  of  Milton,  Dryden,  Pope. 
Coleridge  :  Lectures  on  Shakespeare,  and  Biographia  Literaria. 
Macaulay  :  Essay  on  Moore's  Life  of  Byron. 
.  M.  Arnold  :  Critical  Essays. 

Chaucer :  as  in  Undergraduate  Course. 
Langland :  Piers  Plowman. 
Shakespeare  :  as  in  Undergraduate  Course. 
Marlowe:  Tamburlaine  ;  Edward  II. 
Lamb's  Specimens  of  English  Dramatic  Poets. 
Milton  :  as  in  Undergraduate  Course. 
Wordsworth  :  as  in  the  Undergraduate  Course. 

II. — French  Language  and  Literature. 

The  subjects  for  examination  are  divided  into  Four  Groups.  Of  these, 
the  first  two  are  compulsory.  Each  candidate  must,  in  addition,  take 
either  tlie  third  or  the  fourth  group  at  his  option. 

Note. — Candidates  are  expected  to  make  themselves  acquainted  with 
the  outlines  of  the  History  of  France  in  so  far  as  it  bears  on  the  work 
prescribed. 

The  Four  Groups  are  as  follows  : — 

Group  I  (Compulsory). 

1.  Translation  from  English  into  French. 

2.  Translation  into  English  of  Unprepared  Passages  of  French. 

3.  An  Essay  in  French  on  one  of  several  literary  subjects  proposed. 

4.  {a)  Grammar  of  Modern  French,  including  Phonetics. 

\b)  Outlines  of  tlie  Historical  Development  of  the  French  Language. 
(c)  Outlines  of  the  Histoiical  Development  of  French  Versification. 

Note. — Separate  papers  on  Section  (4),  sub-sections  («),  {b),  and  (c), 
will  be  set  for  Candidates  taking  Group  IV. 

Group  II  (Compulsory). 

Selected  Authors  and  Texts  of  the  Sixteenth,  Seventeenth,  and 
Eighteenth  Centuries  (as  below). 

Group  III  (Optional). 

Selected  Texts  of  the  Nineteenth  Century  (as  below). 

Group  IV  (Optional). 

(a)  A  more  detailed  knowledge  of  the  History  of  the  French  Language 
up  to  the  end  of  the  Fifteenth  Century. 

[h)  A  detailed  knowledge  of  the  dialects  of  Old  French  up  to  the  end 
of  the  Thirteenth  Century. 

(c)  Selected  Medieval  Texts  (as  below). 


MOBERATORSHIPS  IN  HODEBK  IITERATUEE.  133 

PRBSCKIBBD    BoOKS. 

Group  II.  ... 

Candidates  must  show  a  first-hand  acquaintance  wiih  tlie  principal 
works  of — Ronsard,  Corneille,  Moliere,  Racine,  and  Marivaux. 

Gkoui-  III.  . 

Balzac : — Eugenie   Grandet,    Un    Menage   de   Garcjon,    Ursule 

,     Mirouet. 
Gautier  :  Emaux  et  Camees. 
Leconte  de  Lisle  :  I'oenies  antiques,  Poemes  barbares,  Puenies 

tragiques. 
Verlaine  :  Fetes  galantes,  Sagesse. 
Barres  :  Colette  Baiidoche,  Le  Voyage  de  Sparte,  La  Colline 

inspiree. 
Peladan  :  Les  Aniants  de  Pise. 

H.  de  Regnier :  Histoires  incertaines,  Le  Plateau  de  Laque,  La 
Cite  des  Eaux,  La  Sandale  ailee,  Esquisses 
venitiennes. 

R.  de  Gourmont :  Pages  choisies  (Mercure  de  France). 

Signoret :  Poesies. 

Montesquiou  :  Les  Perles  rouges. 

Huysmans  :  Pages  choisies  (Dent). 

L.  le  Cardonnel :  Pofeines,  Carmina  Sacra. 

NoTK — Candidates  are  expected  to  make  themselves  acquainted  with 
the  history  of  the  various  movemei\ts  in  French  literature  from  the 
dose  of  the  Romantic  period  till  1914. 

Gkoup  IV. 

(a)  {b)  Brunot :  Histoire  de  la  Langue  Fran9aise  (Colin),  vol.  i. 

(c)  La  Vie  de  Saint  Alexis  (in  Champion's  Classiques  Fran^ais 

du  Moyen-Age). 
Le  Pelerinage  de  Charlemagne  (Karls  des  Grossen  Reise 

nach  Jerusalem,  ed.  Koschwitz,  pub.  Reisland,  Leipzig). 
La  Chanson  de  Roland  (in  Mudie's  Bibl.  Romanics). 
Gormund  et  Isembard  (in  Champion's  Classiques  Fran^ais 

du  Moyen-Age). 
La  Chastelaine  de  Vergi  (same  series) . 
Adam  le  Bossu  :  Le  Jeu  de  la  Feuillee  (same  series). 
Aucassin    et    Nicolette  (ed.    Suchier-Counsoii,  published 

Schoningh,  Paderborn). 
Villon :    Lais   et  Testament   (in   Champion's  Classiques 

Franqais  du  Moyen-Age). 
Courtois  d'Arras  (in  Champion's  Classiques  Fran9ais  du 

Moyen-Age). 


134 


itODEKAfOflSHtrS  m  MdDfcKff  LitEUiWRE* 


The   distribution   of   Papers  and   allotment   of   Marks    will   be 
follows : — 


Group  I. 


Group  II. 
Group  III. 
Group  IV. 
Viva  Voce, 


(1)  One  hour  and  a  half, 

(2)  One  hour  and  a  half, 

(3)  One  hour, 

(4)  Two  liours. 
Three  hours, 
Three  hours, 
Three  hours, 


Tobil, 


75  marks. 

50  marks. 

50  marks. 

75  marks. 
100  marks. 

100  marks )     i,         ,•     , 
100  marks)   alternatively. 

50  marks. 
500  marks. 


III. — German  Language  and  Literature. 

The  subjects  for  examination  are  divided  into  Four  Groups.  Of  these, 
the  first  two  are  compulsory.  Each  candidate  must  in  addition  take 
either  the  third  or  the  fourth  group  at  his  option. 

Note. — Students  are  expected  to  make  themselves  acquainted  with 
the  outlines  of  the  History  of  Germany  in  so  far  as  it  bears  on  the 
literary  period  studied  in  each  term. 


Group  I  (Compulsory). 


Translation  from  English  into  German. 

Translation  into  English  of  Unprepared  Passages  of  German. 

An  Essay  in  German  on  one  of  several  literary  subjects  proposed. 

(a)  Grammar  of  Modern  German,  including  Phonetics. 

{h)  Outlines  of  the  Historical  Development  of  tlie  German  Language. 

(c)  Outlines  of  the  Historical  Development  of  German  Versification. 

Note. — Separate  papers  on  Section  4  («),  {b),  and  {c)  will  be  set  for 
candidates  taking  Group  IV. 

Group  II  (Compulsory). 
Selected  texts  (as  below). 

Group  III  (Optional). 

1.  A  more  detailed  knowledge  of  the  History  of  German  Literature  in 
the  Eighteenth  and  Nineteenth  Centuries. 

2.  Texts  selected  from  the  above  period  (as  below). 


Group  IV  (Optional). 

1 .  Philology  of  the  German  Language. 

2.  Grammar  of  Old  English. 

3.  Selected  Medieval  Texts  (as  below). 


MotoEkATORStilPS   iK   MODEltN   LlTKBAtOKK. 


135 


Pkeschihed  Books. 

Group  I.,        .     Kauffmann  :  Deutsche  Metrik. 
Weise  :  Unsere  Muttersprache. 

Group  II.,      .     Walther  von  der  Vogelweide:  Gedichte. 
Der  Nibeliinge  Not. 
Haitniann  von  Aue   and   Wolfram  von    Eschenbacli 

(as  contained  in  "Wright's  Middle  High  German 

Primer). 
Freytfig :    Bilder  aus  der  deutschen  Vergangenheit. 

Vol.  i. 

Gkoup  III.,    .     Lessing:  Minna  von  Barnhelm,  Emilia  Galotti ;  die 

Hamburgische  Dramaturgie. 
Goethe  :  Lieder,  Balladen,  Vermischte  Gedichte  ;  Gotz 

von  Berlicliingen,  Iphigenie  auf  Taiiris,  Faust. 
Schiller:  Balladen, philosophische  Gedichte  ;  Wallen- 

slein,  Die  Braut  von  Messina,  Wilhelm  Tell. 
Kleist :    Der  Zerbrochene  Krug,  Prince  Friedrich  von 

Honiburg. 
Grillparzer:  Die  Ahnfrau,  Kcinig  Ottokars  Gliick  und 

Ende,  Der  Traum,  ein  Leben. 
Hebbel :  .Agnes  Bernauer,  Die  Nibelungen, 

Group  IV.,     .     Wriglit :  Historical  German  Grammar. 
Wright :  Gothic  Grammar. 

Braune:  Abriss  der  althochdeutschen  Grammatik. 
Sievers  :  Abriss  der  angelsachsischen  Grammatik. 
Sweet :  Anglo-Saxon  Reader  (Prose  Extracts). 
Braune  :  Althochdeutsihes  Lesebuch. 
Wyld  :  Historical  Study  of  the  Mother  Tongue. 


The   Distribution  of   Papers    and    allotment  of  Marks  will   be  as 
follows : — 


Group  I. 


Group  II. 
Group  III. 
Group  IV. 
Viva  Voce, 


(1)  One  hour  and  a  half, 

(2)  One  hour  and  a  half, 

(3)  One  hour, 

(4)  Two  hours, 
Three  hours. 
Three  hours. 
Three  hours, 


Total, 


75  marks. 

50  marks. 

50  marks. 

75  marks. 
100  marks. 

100  marks )     i.        .•     . 
lOOnmrks}  ^alternatively. 

50  marks. 
500  marks. 


IV. — Kalian  Language  and  Literature. 

The  aubjects  for  examination  are  divided  into  Four  Groups.  Of  these 
the  first  two  are  compulsory.  Each  candidate  must,  in  addition,  take 
either  the  third  or  the  fouitii  group  at  his  option. 

Note. — Candidates  are  expected  to  make  themselves  acquainted  with 
the  outlines  of  the  History  of  Italy  in  so  far  as  it  bears  on  the  work 
prescribed. 


136  MODERATOUSHIPS  IN  MOBEHN  UTEBATDRE. 

Gkouv  I.  (Compulsory). 

1.  Translation  from  English  into  Italian. 

2.  Translation  into  English  of  Unprepared  Passages  of  Italian. 

3.  An  Essay  in  Italian  on  one  of  several  literary  subjects  proposed. 

4.  (a)  Grammar  of  Modern  Italian,  including  Phonetics. 

(J)  Outlines    of    the    Historical    development    of    the     Italian 
Language. 

(c)  Outlines  of  the  Historical  development  of  Italian  Versification 

Note. — Separate  papers  on  Section  (4),  sub-sections  {a),  (i),  and  (c), 
will  be  set  for  candidates  taking  Group  IV. 

Group  II.  (Compulsory). 
Selected  Texts  of  Classical  Italian  Literature  (as  below). 

Group  III.  (Optional). 
Selected  Texts  of  the  nineteenth  century  (as  below). 

Group  IV. 

The  History  of  the  Italian  Language. 

(For  further  information  apply  to  the  Professor.) 

Note. — Candidates  proposing  to  offer  Group  IV  must  give  notice  to 
the  Senior  Lecturer  and  to  the  Professor  on  or  before  June  L5th  in  the 
year  preceding  that  in  which  they  propose  to  present  themselves. 

Prescribed  Books. 

Group  I.  (3). — Candidates  should  read  either 

De  Sanctis :  Storia  delhi  Litteratura  italiana  (Bari- 
Laterza) ; 
or 

Hauvette  :    Litteiature    italienne      (Paris — Armand 
Colin). 

Group  II.,        .     Dante  :  Divina  Commedia. 
Petrarca :  Bime. 
Sannazaro :  L' Arcadia. 
Poliziano  :     L'Orfeo    (ed.    Donati,    pub.    Albrighi, 

Secati  and  C,  Rome). 
Tasso :  L'Aminta. 
Guarini :  II  Pastor  Fido. 

Marino  :  Poesie  Varie  (ed.  Croce,  pub.  Laterza,  Bari). 
Lirici  Marinisti  (ed.   Croce,    pub.    Laterza,    Bari) : 

Stigliani,  Achillini,  Preti,  Materdona. 
Metastasio :  Drammi  scelti,  etc.    (ed.  Scuppa,  pub. 

Albrighi,  Secati  and  C,  Rome). 
Ariosto :  Orlando  furioso,  Episodi  scelti  (ed.  Turri, 

pub.  Sansoni,  Florence). 
Berni:  Orlando  inamorato,  Testo  scelto  (ed.  Albini, 

pub.  Sansoni,  Florence). 
Boccaccio :     Novelle    scelte    (ed.    Fomaciari,    pub. 

Sansoni,  Florence). 


MODEHATOttSHIPS   IN   MODKKN   LlTKllATUllE.  137 

Group  III.,      .     Mauzoni :   Poesie  Ihiulie. 
Leopardi  :  Prose  inoiali. 
Fogazzaio  :  Piccolo  mondo  anlico. 
Giacosa :   II  Coitte  rosso. 
Carducci :    Antologia   Carducciana   (Bologna — Zani- 

chelli). 
D'Annunzio  :  Prose  scelte  (Milan — Treves). 
Neneioni :   Saggi  critici  aulla  letteratura  ilaliana. 
Gozzano  :  L'Altare  del  Passalo  (Milan — Treves). 

,,        :  I  CoUoqui  (Milan — Treves). 
Morselli  :  Oricne.     Glauco  (Milan — Treves). 
Vismara  :  Lirica  italiana  del  Rinascimento  (Florence 

— Libreria  Editrice  Fiorentina). 
Torraca :    Scrilti  critici  (Naples — Perrella)    [Jacopo 

Sannazaro]. 
Carducci :  Saggi  aul  Tasso  e  su  Ludovico  Ariosto. 

Group  IV.,       .    Apply  to  the  Professor. 

Tlie  Distribution  of  Papers  and  allotment  of  Marks  will  be  as 
follows :  — 

Group  I.         (1)  One  hour  and  a  half,  75  marks. 

(2)  One  hour  and  a  half,  50  marks. 

(3)  One  hour,         .         .  50  marks. 

(4)  Two  hours,      .         .  75  marks. 
Group  II.      Three  hours,           .         .  100  marks. 

Group  III.  Three  liours,  .  .  100  marks  \  „u_,.„„f;„»i_. 
Group  IV.  Three  hours,  .  .  100  marks  /  '"^®*"'^"^. y- 
Viva  Voce, 50  marks. 

Total,  500  marks. 

V. — Spanish  Language  and  Literature. 

The  subjects  for  examination  are  divided  into  four  Groups.  Of  'hese, 
the  first  two  are  conipulsor)'.  Each  candidate  must,  in  addition,  take 
either  the  third lor  the  fourth  group  at  his  option. 

Note. — Candidates  are  expected  to  make  theiaselves  acquainted  with 
the  outlines  of  the  History  of  Spain  in  so  far  as  it  boars  on  the  work 
prescribed. 

Group  I  (Compulsory). 

1.  Translation  from  English  into  Spanish. 

2.  Translation  into  English  of  Unprepared  Passages  of  Spanish. 

3.  An  Essay  in  Spanish  on  one  of  the  several  literary  subjects 

proposed. 

4.  (a)  Grammar  of  Modern  Spanish,  including  Phonetics. 

(i)  Outlines  of  the  historical  development  of  the  Spanish 
language. 

(e)  Outlines  of  the  historical  development  of  Spanish  versifi- 
cation. 

Note. — Separate  papers  on  Section  (4),  sub-sections  («),  (i),  and  (c) 
will  be  set  for  Candidates  taking  Group  IV. 


138  MODEKATORSHIPS   IN   MODERN   LITERATURE. 

Group  II  (Compulsory). 
Selected  Texts  of  Classical  Spanish  Literatuie  (as  below). 

Group  III    (Optional). 
Selected  Texts  of  the  Nineteenth  Century  (as  belovr). 

Group  IV. 

The  History  of  the  Spanish  Language. 

(For  farther  information  apply  to  the  Professor.) 

Note. — Candidates  proposing  to  offer  Group  IV  must  give  notice  to 
the  Senior  Lecturer  and  to  the  Professor  on  or  before  June  loih  in  the 
year  preceding  that  in  which  they  propose  to  present  themselves. 

Prescribed  Books. 

Group  I  (3).     Students  should  read — 

Fitzmaurice-Kelly  :     Litterature      espaguole     (Armand    Colin) 
(there  is  also  a  Spanish  edition) ; 
and  besides  the  books  on  Bon  Quixote  set  for  Honors,  either  Fitzmaurice- 
Kelly  :  Miguel  de  Cervantes-Saavedra  (Oxford),  (Spanish  or  English 
edition),  or  Savj-Lopez:  Cervantes  (Naples — Ricciardi). 

(4)  (rt)  For    Plioneties — T.    Navarro   Tonias  :    Pronunciaci6n 
espanola  (Re vista  de  Filologia  espaiiola). 
{b)  Gorra :    Lingua  e   Letterature  spagnuola  delle  Origin! 
(Milan— Hoepli). 

Group  II.     .     Cervantes :    Don    Quijote,    Novelas    Ejemplaies,    La 

Galatea. 
Calderon  :  El  Alcalde  de  Zalamea,  La  Vida  es  Sueiio, 

El  M^gico   prodigioso   (with  Menendez  y  Pelayo  : 

Calderon). 
Lope  de  Vega  :  La  Moza  de  Cantaro.     La  Dorotea. 
Montemayor :  La  Diana,  Part  I. 
Garcilaso  de  la  Vega :   Obras. 
Gongora  :  Mejores  Poesias  (Saenz  de  Jubera). 
Spanish  Ballads  (Oxford). 

Group  III.  .     Valle-Inclan :     La     Marquesa    Rosalinda     (Perlado- 
Paez). 
A.  Machado:  Poesias  (Residencia  de  Estudiantes). 
Jimenez:  Pastorales  (llenacimiento). 
Ruben    Dario :    Obras    Escogidas   (2    vols.    Viuda    de 

Piieyo). 
Marquina :  En  Flandes  se  ha  puesto  el  Sol. 
Pio  Baroja :  Cuentos. 
Group  IV.    .     Apply  to  the  Professor. 

Note. — Candidates  proposing  to  offer  Group  IV  must  give  notice  to 
the  Senior  Lecturer  and  to  the  Professor  on  or  before  June  loth  in  the 
year  preceding  that  in  which  they  propose  to  present  tliemselves. 


i 


MODE  KATOUSH  IPS  IN  MODERN  LITERATTrRK.  139 

The   distribution    of    Papers    and    allotment   of   marks   will    be   as 
follows  : — 

Group  I.         (1)  One  hour  and  a  half,         75  marks. 
(2)  One  hour  afid  a  half,         75  marks. 
50  marks. 
75  marks. 
100  marks. 

l2SI;k:.■^>'«">''«'•'^ 

50  marks. 


(3j  One  hour, 
(4)  Two  hours, 
Group  II.      Three  hours, 
Group  III.    Three  hours, 
Group  IV.      Three  hours, 
Viva  Voce,        ,        , 


500  marks. 
Notice  of  Candidature,  with  groups  chosen,  must  be  given  to  the 
Senior  Lecturer  on  or  before  June  15th. 


MODERATORSHIPS  IN  LEGAL  AND  POLITICAL  SCIENCE. 

The  subjects  of  examination  and  the  marks  to  be  assigned  to  the 
several  subjects  are  as  follows : — 

I.  Roman  Law  :  one  paper  (120  marks). 

Candidates  will  be  examined  in  the  Course  of  Roman  Law 
prescribed  for  Honors  in  the  Junior  Sophister  year,  together 
with  a  special  portion  of  the  Digest.  In  1919,  and  until  further 
notice,  tlie  portion  will  be— Book  ix,  Title  2  (Ad  Legem 
Aquiliam). 

II.  Jurisprudence  and  International  Law:  one  paper  (100  marks). 

(a)  Jurisprudence. 

Analytical  and  Historical  Jurisprudence,  as  appointed 
in  the  Sophister  Honor  Courses. 

(A)  International  Law. 

The  Course  of  International  Law  appointed  for  the 
Honor  Examinations  of  the  Junior  Sophister  year,  to  be 
studied  in  greater  detail  in  one  of  the  larger  text- books 
(e.g. '  HaU's  International  Law '),  together  with  a  special 
topic  of  International  Law.  In  1914,  and  until  further 
notice,  this  topic  will  be  'The  Law  of  Contraband  and 
Blockade.' 

(c)  Private  International  Law. 

The  general  principles  of  the  subject. 
[Westlake,  'Private  International  Law.'] 

III.  Constitutional  History  and  Law,  and  Legal  History  :  one  paper 
(120  marks). 

The  Junior  Sophister  Honor  Course  studied  in  greater 
detail,  together  with  the  leading  features  of  English 
legal  institutions. 

[Maitland,  The  Constitutional  History  of  England. 
Anson,  Law  and  Custom  of  the  Constitution. 
Jenks,  History  of  English  Law.] 


140        MODERATORSHIPS   IN   LKGAL   AND    I'OIITICAL   SCIENCE. 

IV.  Law  of  Property  :  one  paper  (120  marks). 

The  leading  features  of  the  Law  of  Property  as  treated 
ia  ^he  Sopbister  Honor  Courses. 

v.  Equity  :  one  paper  (100  marks). 

The  Principles  of  Equity,  as  treated  in  the  Senior 
Sopbister  Honor  Courses. 

VI.  The  Law  of  Obligations :  one  paper  (120  marks). 

The  Law  of  Contract  and  Torts,  as  appointed  for  the 
Sophister  Honor  Courses. 

VII.  Criminal  Law  and  the  Law  of  Evidence  :  one  paper  (100  marks). 
The   Law  of  Evidence,   as   appointed  for  the   Junior 
Sophister    Honor    Course,    together    with     the    general 
principles  of  Criminal  Law. 

[Stephen,  Digest  of  Criminal  Law. 
Kenny,  Cases  on  Criminal  Law,  Parts  i.  and  ii.] 

VIII.  Political  Science:  one  paper  (100  marks). 

In  addition  to  the  general  course  prescribed  for  Honors 
in  the  Sophister  years,  Candidates  will  be  required  to  show 
acquaintance  with  the  general  principles  of  Politics ;  the 
structure,  functions,  and  development  of  the  State;  and 
the  history  of  political  theories,  together  with  a  prescribed 
text.  In  1919,  and  until  further  notice,  the  prescribed 
text  will  be  "The  Federalist,"  Letters  I-XXXVIII, 
inclusive. 

IX.  Economics:  one  paper  (120  marks). 

In  addition  to  the  general  course  prescribed  for  Honors 
in  the  Junior  Sophister  year,  the  subjects  of  Currency, 
Banking,  Foreign  Trade,  and  Socialism  are  appointed  for 
special  study  : — 

Taussig,  Principles  of  Economics. 
E.  C.  K.  Ensor,  Modern  Socialism. 
Dunbar,  Theory  and  History  of  Banking  ; 
Clare,  Money-Market  Primer ; 

Notice  of  Candidature  must  be  given  to  the  Senior  Lecturer  on  or 
before  June  15th. 


MODERATORSHIPS  IN  ENGINEERING  SCIENCE. 

Candidates  whose  names  are  on  the  Register  of  the  Engineering 
School  may,  at  the  close  of  their  Senior  Sophister  year,  compete 
for  Moderatorships  in  Engineering  Science.  . 

The  Course  for  these  consists  of  the  general  Courses  arranged 
for  the  Experimental  Science  Moderatorship,  and  one  of  the 
following  three  Courses  (in  place  of  the  Special  Course  in  either 


^^ 


MODKUATORSHIPS   IN   ENGINKERING   SCIENCE.  141 

Physics  or  Chemistry,  as  required  for  the  Experimental  Science 
Moderatorship) : — 

I.  Civil  Engineering  and  Materials  used  in  Construction,  as 
lectured  on  by  the  Professors  of  Civil  Engineering  and 
Geology. 
II.  Electrical  and  Mechanical  Engineering,  as  lectured  on  by 
the  Erasmus  Smith  Professor  of  Experimental  Science, 
the  Lecturer  in  the  Practice  of  Electrical  Engineering, 
and  the  Lecturer  in  Mechanical  Engineering. 
III.  Geology,  Petrology,  Mining,  and  Mineralogy,  as  lectured 
on  by  the  Professor  of  Geology. 

This  Special  Course  includes  Practical  work  in  the  Laboratories 
of  Mechanical  Engineering,  Electrical  Engineering,  or  Geology, 
according  to  the  Course  selected. 

Notice  of  Candidature,  with  Courses  ehosen,  must  be  given  to 
the  Senior  Lecturer  on  or  before  June  loth. 


MODERATORSHIPS  IN  CELTIC  LANGUAGES. 

(rt)  Irish  Texts — 

The  Wiirzburg  Glosses. 

Tain  Bd  Cualnge  (ed.  Stracban  and  O'Keetfe,  supplement  to 

Eriu). 
Fled  Bricrend. 
Tri  Bhir-Ghaoithe  an  Bhais. 
Imram  Brain. 

(i)   Comparative  Grammar  of  the  Celtic  LanguagCH. 

(c)   Composition  in  Irish. 

{d)  Irish  Metric. 

(«)  Elements  of  Palaeography. 

(/)  Joyce  '•  Social  History  of  Ancient  Ireland. 

Rhys  :  Celtic  Britain. 

J.  Mac  Neill :  Phases  of  Irish  History. 

{g)  "Welsh  Texts— 

Strachan,  Introduction  to  Early  Welsh,  the  Reader  (omitting 

vii,  viii,  and  ix)  ; 
Breuddwyt  Maxen  ; 
Branwcn  veirch  Lyr. 


142  MODEKATOBSHIPS  IN  CELTIC  LANGUAGKS. 

The  marks  are  assigned  in  the  following  scale : — 

1.  Old  and  Middle  Irish  Texts, 350 

2.  Comparative  Grammar,         . .  . ,  . .  . .         . ,  150 

3.  "Welsh  Texts 150 

4.  Joyce's  and  Rhys'  books,  as  above,  . .  . .  . .  150 

5.  Modern  Irish  (texts,  composition,  and  viva  voce),  , .  200 

Notice  of  Candidature  must  be  given  to  the  Senior  Lecturer  on  or 
before  June  1 5th. 


MODERATORSHIP  IN  ORIENTAL  LANGUAGES. 

A  candidate  for  Moderatorship  in  Oriental  Languages  is  allowed 
to  select  any  one  of  five  courses.  Tliese  courses  consist  each 
of  (A)  a  principal,  and  (B)  a  subsidiary  language.    These  are — 

A. — Principal.  B, — Subsidiary. 

1.  Arabic        and    Hebrew  or  Persian. 

2.  Hebrew     and    Arabic  or  Aramaic  or  Syriac  or  Assyrian. 


3.  Persian      and    Arabic. 

4.  Sanskrit     and    Pali  or  classical  Tamil. 
6.  Pali  and    Sanskrit. 


Candidates  will  be  examined  by  papers  and  oruUy.  The  tei 
will  consist  of  translation  from,  and  questions  on,  prescribi 
texts,  translation  of  passages  from  unprescribed  texts,  composition 
in  the  selected  languages,  questions  on  the  history  and  literature 
of  the  different  nations  to  whom  those  languages  belong,  questions 
on  grammar  and  philology. 

For  the  different  courses  the  following  prescribed  texts  and 
special  works  on  history,  literature,  philology,  and  grammar  are 
proposed :  — 

A. — Arabic, 

Ibn  Khaldun  :  Prolegomena,  Books  iv  and  v  (Beyrut  ed.,  1900). 
Mas'udi:  Muriij  udh  dhahab,  chaps.  7,  31,  67,  68  (ed.  Meynard). 
Hariri:  Mukamat,  Nos.  6, 11, 18,  49,  50  (ed.  Eeinaudand  Derenbourg) 
Saha''  Mu'alhikdt ;  Odes  of  Imrulkais  and  Labid   (ed.  Lyall). 
Abu  Tammam:     Hamdsa  (ed.  Freytag),  Bk.  I,  pp.  19-61  ;  Bk.  II, 
pp. 365-411. 

Muir:  Annals  of  the  £arlp  Khalifat. 

Muir  :  Life  of  Muhammad. 

Nicholson  :    Literary  History  of  the  Arabs. 

Wright :  Arabic  Grammar. 

Wright ;  Comparative  Grammar  of  the  Semitic  Languages. 


J 


M0DKRAT0K8H1PS  IN  ORtENTAL  LANGUAGES.  143 

B. — Hebrew. 


Exodus,  i-xxiv. 
Psalms,  xc-cvi. 


Wade  :  Old  Testament  History. 
Gray:   Critical  f.ntroduction  to  the  Old  Testament, 
Driver :  Introduction  to  Notes  on  the  Hebrew  text  of  the  Books  of 
Samuel,  pp.  i-lv. 

B. — Peksian, 

Sa'di:  Oulistdn,  Book  i,  pp.  13-45  (ed.  Platts). 
Pizzi:  Antologia  Firdusiana,  chaps.  1-8,  pp.  58-125. 
Adventures  of  Hdji  Bdba,  Persian  Translation,  pp.  215-267  (Baptist 
Mission  Press,  Calcutta,  1905). 


Benjamin  :  Persia  and  the  Persians. 
Claude  Hill :  Persian  Literature. 
Platts  and  Ranking  :  Persian  Grammar. 

II. 

A. — Hebrew. 

1  and  2  Samuel. 

Psalms  Ixxiii-lxxxix. 

Isaiah,  i-xxxiii. 

Proverbs,  i-9. 

Pirqe  Abhoth  (ed.  Taylor^. 

Kiriichi  on  Psalms  Ixxiii-lxxxiii. 

Cooke:  North-Semitic  Inscriptions,  ■p^.  1-157. 


Foakes- Jackson  :  Biblical  History  of  the  Hebrews. 

Cheyne  :  Jewish  Religious  Life  after  the  Exile. 

Kautzsch  :  Article  on  tlie  Religion  of  Israel  in  Hastings'  Lict.  of  the 

Bible  (Extra  Volume). 
Robertson  Smith  :  Religion  of  the  Semites. 
Wright :  Comparative  Grammar  of  the  Semitic  Languages. 
Driver :  Introduction  to  the  Literature  of  the  Old  Testament. 

B. — AUAUAIC. 

The  Aramaic  portions  of  the  Old  Testament. 
Elephantine  Papyri  (ed.  Ungnad),  Nos.  1-10,  27-31. 
Onkelos  on  Genesis  xii-xxviii. 


Walker  :  Article  on  the  Targums  in  Hastings'  Diet,  of  the  Bible. 


144  MODEKATORSIIIPS  IN  ORIENTAL  lANGlTAGKS. 

B.  —  Sykiac. 

Eusebius,  Eccl.  Hist,  ii  (ed.  Wright  and  McLean), 
Remnants  of  the  Later  Syriac  Version*  (J.  Gwynn),  Introduction  and 
Part  1. 


Duval :  La  Litlerature  Syriaque. 

Nestle :  Article  on  the   Syriac  Versions  in   Hastings'   Diet,  of  the 
Bible. 

B.— Assyrian. 

Annals  of  the  Kings  of  Assyria  (Budnre  and  King),  vol.  i. 
Epic  of  Gilgamesh,  tahlet  xi  (Abel-Winckler,  Berlin,  1890). 
King:  First  Steps  in  Assyrian. 


Jastrow :  Aspects  of  Religious  Belief  and  Practice  in  Babylonia  and 

Assyria. 
Hommel :  Articles  on  Assyria  and  Babylonia  in  Hastings'  Diet,  of 

the  Bible. 

III. 

A.— Peusian. 
Firdausi :  Shdhndmah,  pp.  1364-1420  (ed.  Macan,  vol.  iii). 
Ha6z  :  Dtwdn,  Odes  I  to  iAi  inclusive  (ed.  Rosenzweig). 
Jalaluddln  Rumi :  Masnavi,  Book  i  to  end  of  Second  Tale  (Bombay 

ed.). 
Dawlat  Shah  :   Tahakdt-i-shiC ard  Tabakas  1  and  2  (ed.  Browne). 
Nidham-ul-niulk :  5iyas»a^-«amaA,  pp.  54-205  (ed.  Schefer). 

Sykes  :  History  of  Persia,  2  vols.  (Second  ed.). 
Browne  :  Literary  History  of  Persia,  3  vols. 

Darmsteter  :  Etudes  Iraniennes,  vols,  i  and  ii. 
Pliillott :  Higher  Persian  Grammar. 

B.  — Arabic. 
Qur^dn,  Suras  3  and  4. 

Majdni  al-adab,  vol.  ii,  pp.  79-90,  171-247  (Beyrut,  1901). 
Ibn  ul  Tiktaka:  Al-Fakhri,  pp.  65-85  (ed.  Derenbourg). 

Margoliouth  :  Muhammed  and  the  Rise  of  Islam. 

Huart :  Arabic  Literature. 

Amir  Ali :  History  of  the  Saracens. 

Palmer :  Arabic  Grammar. 

IV. 

A. — Sanskrit. 

Lanman  :  Sanskrit  Reader. 

Macdonnell :  Selected  Hymns  of  the  Rig-veda. 

Manu,  Books  vi  and  vii. 

Kalidasa  :  Meghaduta  with  Mallinatha's  Commentary, 

Dandin  :  Das'akumdracarita,  ucchvasa  i,  ii. 


MODKRATOUSHIPS  IN  OIUENTAL  LANGUAGES.  145 

Miicdonnell :  History  of  Sanskrit  Literattire. 
Macdonnell :    Vedic  Mythology. 
Hopkins:  Religions  of  India. 
Smith  :  Early  History  of  India. 
Macdonnell :    Vedic  Grammar. 

Candidates  will  be  expected   to  have  a   general  knowledge  of  the 
Comparative  Grammar  of   I-E  languages,   with    special   reference   to 

Sanskrit. 

B.— Pali. 

Duroiselle  :  Fractical  Grammar  of  the  Pali  Language  (Rangoon,  1906). 
Dines  Andersen:  A  Fall  Reader  with  Glossary  and  Notes  (two  parts). 
The  Dhamniapada  (Pali  Text  Society's  ed.). 


Ehys  Davids  :  American  Lectures  on  Buddhism. 

B. — Classical  Tamil. 

Tamil  Minor  Poets  :   Attisudi,  Konreiventham. 

Kurral,    Book   i,   Chapters    1-12  inclusive  :    First    three    chapters 

Naladiyar ;  Three  hymns  Tiruva9agam. 
Beschi's  Grammar  of  Classical  Shen -Tamil. 
N.  S.  Purna  Lingam  Pillai :   Primer  of  Tamil  Literature. 
Papers  Indian  Vernacular  Literature  and  Poets  of  the  Tamil  Land. 
The  article  Dravidian  in  the  British  Encyclopaedia. 

V. 

A.— Pali. 

Vimaya  Pitakam  :  Kammavdca. 
Sutta  Pitakam  :  Llpavamsa. 

Dhammakitli. 

Milindfipanho. 

Mahavamso,  chaps,  v-ix. 


Rhys  Davids:  Buddhist  India. 

Rhys  Davids :  American  Lectures  on  Buddhism. 

F.  Mason :  Kaccayan. 

B. — Sanskkit. 

Macdonnell :  Sanskrit  Grammar. 
Story  of  Nala,  as  in  Lanman's  Sanskrit  Reader. 

Selections  from  the  Hitopadefn,  the  Kathdsaritsdgara  and  the  Lawi 
of  Manu  as  in  Lanman's  Sanskrit  Reader. 


Macdonnell  ;  History  of  Sanskrit  Literature, 
H 


146  MODEKATOBSUIPS  IN    OEIENTAI,   LANGUAGES. 

The  distribution  of  Papers  and  allotment  of  Marks  will  be  as 
follows : — 

Dayp  I  and  II  (Primary  Language). 

Four  papers  on  the  prescribed  texts,  . .         40U 

Day  II  (Primary  Language). 

Composition  (150)  and  Oral  Examination  (50),       200 
ilistory  and  Literature,  ..         ..         ..         150 

Day  IV  (Secondary  Language). 

Two  papers  on  the  prescribed  course,  . .         250 

Note. — (a)  In  the  case  of  each  language  unseen  passages  for  transla- 
tion M'ill  be  set  along  M'ith  those  from  the  prescribed  texts. 
{b)  The  Oral  Examination  will  include  reading. 
(e)  In  Hebrew,  Composition  will  include  pointing  unpointed  passages. 


Notice  of  Candidature  must  be  given  to  the  Senior  Lecturer  on 
or  before  June  16th. 


(     147     ) 


The  Lecturing  Staff  in  the  University  of  Dublin  consists  of  the 
Junior  Fellows  and  Professors. 

Lectures  are  delivered  in  all  the  Courses  by  which  Terms  may 
be  kept  in  Arts,  or  in  which  Honors  can  be  obtained  at  the  Term 
Examinations,  in  the  subjects  which  are  studied  in  the  Professional 
Schools,  and  in  various  other  departments  of  knowledge. 

LECTUKKS  IN   AUTS  WHICH   COUNT   TOWARDS  THE  KEEPING   OF 
TEKMS. 

ORDINARY  AND  HONOR  LECTURES. 

Mathematics,    Mathe7natical    Physics,    Classics,    Mental   and 

Moral  Philosoj)hj/,  and  Experimental  Physics Lectures  in  the 

above  subjects  are  delivered  by  the  Tutor  Fellows  to  the  Students 
in  Arts,  at  hours  announced  in  each  Term. 

Special  Lecturers  are  selected  to  lecture  Candidates  for  Honors 
in  Mathematics,  Mathematical  Physics,  Classics,  and  Mental  and 
Moral  Philosophy. 

Let/al  and  Political  Science.-  Special  Lecturers  are  selected  to 
lecture  Candidates  for  Honors  in  this  subject. 

Chemistry. — The  following  Courses  of  Lectures  are  delivered : — 
First  year :  (1)  a  Course  on  General  Elementary  Chemistry, 
three  days  a  week,  during  Michaelmas  and  Hilary  Terms; 
(2)  a  Course  of  Honor  Lectures,  once  a  week,  supplementing 
the  above.  Second  year :  a  Course  of  Honor  Lectures  on  Inor- 
ganic Chemistry,  once  a  week,  during  the  three  Terms.  I'hird 
year:  (1)  a  Course  of  Honor  Lectures  on  Organic  Chemistry, 
twice  a  week,  during  the  three  Terms ;  (2)  a  Course  of  Honor 
Lectures  on  Physical  Chemistry,  once  a  week,  during  the  three 
Terms.  Fourth  year :  occasional  Honor  Lectures  on  Inorganic, 
Organic  or  Physical  Chemistry,  according  to  the  subject  selected 
by  Candidates  for  Moderatorship  for  Specialisation. 

Practical  Chemistry. — Instruction  is  given  in  the  Laboratory 
in  all  branches  of  Pure  and  Applied  Chemistry,  and  facilities  are 
provided  for  research. 

Botany,  Zoology,  and  Geoloi/y. — The  Professor  of  Botany 
lectures  Junior  Sophisters  upon  three  days  in  each  week 
during  six  weeks  of  Michaelmas  and  of  Hilary  Terms.  The 
Professor  of  Zoology  lectures  during  the  same  period  upon  alter- 
nate days  with  the  Professor  of  Botany.  The  Professor  of 
Geology  and  Mineralogy  lectures  Senior  Sophisters  during  the 
same  period.  In  Michaelmas  and  Hilary  Terms  Demonstrations 
are  given  to  Honor  Students  in  Arts  :  in  Botany,  by  the  Professor 

H  2. 


148  LECTURES. 

of  Botany,  and  in  the  Anatomy  of  the  Invertebrates,  by  the 
Professor  of  Comparative  Anatomy.  Each  of  the  Professors  of 
Botany  and  of  Zoology  gives  a  Course  of  Demonstrations  in 
Trinity  Term.  In  Michaelmas  Term  the  Professor  of  Geology 
and  Mineralogy  gives  a  second  Course  of  Lectures  on  Mineralogy 
and  Petrology. 

French. — Honor  Lectures  are  delivered  by  the  Professor  of 
Romance  Languages  to  Senior  Sophisters,  Junior  Sophisters, 
Senior  Freshmen,  and  Junior  Freshmen.  Lectures  in  the 
Ordinary  Course  are  delivered  by  the  Tutors,  assisted,  when 
the  numbers  require  it,  by  a  special  lecturer  appointed  by  the 
Board. 

German. — The  Professor  of  German  lectures  Senior  Sophisters 
on  three  days  per  week,  Junior  Sophisters  on  three  days  per 
week,  and  also  lectures  the  Senior  and  Junior  Freshmen. 

LECTURES  FOR  CANDIDATES  FOR  M0DERAT0R8HIPS. 

Mathematics  and  Mathematical  Physics.  —  Erasmus  Smith's 
Professor  of  Mathematics  delivers  Lectures  on  three  days  in  each 
week.  The  University  Professor  of  Natural  Philosophy  delivers 
Lectures  on  three  daj-s  in  each  week ;  the  days  and  hours  are 
fixed  at  the  commencement  of  each  Term. 

Classics. — The  Professor  of  Greek  delivers  Lectures  on  Tues- 
days, Thursdays,  and  Saturdays,  during  Term.  The  Professor 
of  Latin  delivers  Lectures  on  Mondays,  Wednesdays,  and  Fridays, 
during  Term.  The  Professor  of  Ancient  History  and  Classical 
Archaeology  lectures  during  Term,  on  days  of  which  public  notice 
is  given.  The  Professor  of  Sanskrit  lectures  on  Comparative 
Grammar,  on  two  days  in  each  week,  during  Term. 

Mental  and  Moral  Philosophy. — The  Professor  of  Moral  Philo- 
sophy delivers  Lectures  during  Term,  of  which  public  notice  is 
given.  Lectures  are  also  delivered  to  the  Senior  Sophister  Class 
by  one  of  the  Honor  Lecturers  in  Mental  and  Moral  Philosophy. 

Experimental  Science. — Candidates  may  attend  the  Lectures 
of  the  Professors  of  Experimental  Philosophy,  and  of  Chemistry. 
In  Experimental  Physics,  the  Honor  Lectures  of  the  Assistant 
may  be  substituted  for  the  ordinary  Lectures  of  the  Professor. 
Notice  of  the  days  and  hours  of  these  Lectures  is  given  at 
the  commencement  of  each  Term.  Candidates  for  Moderator- 
ships  in  Experimental  Science  are  entitled  to  attend  the 
Laboratory  of  the  Professor  of  Chemistry,  from  the  1st  of 
November  to  the  30th  of  June,  on  payment  of  three  guineas  to 
the  Junior  Bursar. 

Natural  Science. — Candidates  may  attend  the  Lectures  and 
Demonstrations  of  the  Professors  of  Botany  and  of  Zoology.  In 
Trinity  Term  the  Professor  of  Geology  and  Mineralogy  gives 


LECTtJEES.  149 

Demonstrations  to  Candidates  for  Moderatorships  in  Natural 
Science. 

History    arid    Political    Science The  Professor  of  History 

lectures  in  each  week  during  Term.  The  Professor  of  Political 
Economy  lectures  in  each  Term  on  General  Economics.  Lectures 
are  also  given  for  Honor  and  Moderatorship  Candidates  on 
(1)  Economic  Theory,  (2)  Economic  Historj'. 

Lectures  on  Political  Science  are  delivered  twice  weekly  during 
Lecture  Term. 

Modern  Literature. — Candidates  may  attend  the  Lectures 
of  the  Professor  of  English  Literature,  of  the  Professor  of  the 
Romance  Languages,  and  of  the  Professor  of  German.  In  Trinity 
Term,  the  Professor  of  German  gives  Prelections  on  some  subject 
connected  with  the  Literature  of  Germany,  which  are  open  to 
the  public,  and  are  advertised  in  the  daily  papers. 

LECTUllES  IN    THE   PKOFESSIONAL  SCHOOLS. 

An  account  of  these  Lectures  will  be  found  in  the  sections 
dealing  with  each  School.  Lectures  connected  with  the  Profes- 
sional Schools  which  are  not  intended  for  Professional  Students 
exclusively  are  also  mentioned  below  under  the  head  "Miscel- 
laneous Lectures,"  or  "  Public  Lectures." 

MISCEXLANEOUS   LECTUKES   AND   COUKSES   OF   INSTRUCTION. 

Astrono7ny. — The  Professor  of  Astronomy  lectures  on  Mondays 
and  Fridays  in  Hilary  Term. 

Experimental  Science. — Any  Graduate  of  Dublin  University 
who  desires  to  pursue  a  post-graduate  Course  of  Instruction  in  the 
Physical  Laboratory  shall  be  i)ermitted  to  do  so  on  payment  of  six 
guineas  for  a  Course  extending  over  three  Terms. 

Extern  Students  may  be  admitted  to  the  Laboratory  Courses 
on  the  following  conditions: — 

The  name  should  in  each  case  be  recommended  by  the  Professor. 

The  fee  for  a  nine  months'  Course  should  be  £10  10s.,  half  to 
be  paid  to  the  Cista  Communis,  and  half  to  the  Professors  or 
Examiners  of  whose  aid  the  Student  should  avail  himself. 

The  number  so  admitted  is  to  be  so  restricted  as  not  to  interfere 
with  the  education  of  the  College  Students. 

liolany. — Graduates  of  Dublin  University  are  allowed  to  pur- 
sue research  in  tlie  IJotaniciil  Laboratory  under  the  supervision  of 
the  Professor  and  his  Assistant  on  payment  of  a  fee  of  two 
guineas  per    TeriH  to  the   fiaboratory. 

Extern  Students,  admitted  by  tlie  Professor,  are  allowed  to 
pursue  research  under  similar  supervision  on  payment  of  tl»ree 
and  a  half  guineas  per  Term  to  the  Laboratory. 

i 


150  LECTtTKES. 

Fees  for  the  Chemical  Lnboratory — Students  on  the  College  books  pay 
(a)  for  Ordinary  Course,  one  <,nnnea  a  Term  for  one  half  day  a  week,  or 
two  guineas  a  Term  for  three  half  days  a  week  ;  [b)  for  Honor  Course  in 
Freshman  years,  one  guinea  a  Term  for  one  iiulf  day  a  week,  or  two 
guineas  a  Term  for  three  half  days  a  week ;  (c)  for  Honor  Course  in 
Sophister  years,  one  guinea  a  Term  for  three  lialf  days  a  week,  or  two 
guineas  a  Term  for  more  than  thiee  half  days  a  week,  provided  that 
the  total  fee  for  the  Moderatorship  Course  shall  not  be  less  than  twelve 
guineas,  nor  more  than  eighteen  guineas ;  (d)  for  all  other  Courses, 
one  guinea  a  Term  for  one  half  day  a  week,  or  two  guineas  a  Term  for 
three  half  days  a  week,  or  three  guineas  a  Term  for  more  than  three 
half  days  a  week.  (A  Medical  or  Engineering  Student  whose  Profes- 
sional Fee  covers  a  Course  in  Practical  Chemistry  in  any  Term,  and  who 
wishes  to  do  more  work  in  the  Laboratory,  pajs  a  half  fee  for  such 
additional  work  in  that  Term.) 

Graduates  working  for  Sc.B.  pay  two  guineas  a  Term. 

Graduates  of  any  approved  University  not  on  the  College  Books 
(working  for  the  Sc.B.  Degree),  pay  £3  10«.  a  Term. 

Pharmaceutical  Students  pay  five  guineas  for  100  hours. 

All  other  Students  pay  two  and  a  half  guineas  a  Term  for  one  half 
day  a  week,  or  three  and  a  half  guineas  a  Term  for  three  half  days  a 
week,  or  four  and  a  half  guineas  a  Term  for  more  than  three  half  days 
a  week. 

Political  Economy. — The  Professor  of  Political  Economy 
delivers  a -Course  of  at  least  nine  Lectures  during  some  one 
of  the  three  Academical  Terms,  which  are  free  to  all  Students. 

English  Literature. — The  Professor  of  English  Literature 
delivers  Lectures  on  three  days  in  the  week  during  Term. 

Hebrew  Lectures.  —  All  Students  are  permitted  to  attend 
Hebrew  Lectures.  The  Professor  of  Hebrew  delivers  public 
Prelections  from  time  to  time  as  required  by  the  Rules  of 
Erasmus  Smith's  Board,  and,  in  addition,  lectures  the  Senior 
Class.  Due  notice  of  the  hours  at  which  these  Lectures 
are  held  is  given  at  the  beginning  of  each  Term.  The  Lec- 
tures of  the  Assistants  are  delivered  on  Tuesdays  and  Thursdays, 
at  nine  o'clock.  For  the  regulations  and  subjects  of  these 
Lectures,  see  below,  Divinity  School,  §  v. 

Irish. — The  Professor  of  Irish  lectures  on  two  days  in  the  week 
during  Term.  The  Students  attending  these  Lectures  are  divided 
into  three  Classes — Junior,  Middle,  and  Senior.  The  Lectures  to 
the  First  Class  are  elementary  ;  tliose  to  the  Middle  and  Senior 
Classes  are  intended  for  such  Students  as  have  made  some  progress 
in  the  Irish  Language.  Notice  of  the  days  and  hours  of  Lecture 
is  given  at  the  beginning  of  each  Terra. 

The  Examination  for  Prizes  is  held  in  Trinity  Term.  For  the 
regulations  of  the  Examination,  see  under  "  Prizes  in  Irish." 

Sanskrit. — The  Professor  of  Sanskrit  teaches  such  Students  as 
may  present  themselves  for  instruction,  at  the  commencement  of 
each  Term,  at  the  rate  of  three  guineas  per  Term. 


LECTUEES.  151 

PUBLIC   LECT0KES. 

The  following  Lectures  are  open  to  the  public,  as  well  as  to  all 
Students : — 

The  Prelections  of — 

The  Professor  of  German. 

The  Regius  Professor  of  Dinnity. 

Archbishop  King's  Professor  of  Divinity. 

The  Professor  of  Hebrew. 

The  Professor  of  Biblical  Greek. 

The  Regius  Professor  of  Laws. 

The  Regius  Professor  of   Feudal  and  English  Law, 
The  Lectures  of — 

The  Professor  of  Astronomy. 

The  Professor  of  Ancient  History. 

The  Professor  of  Moral  Philosophy. 

The  Professor  of  Geology  and  Mineralogy. 

The  Professor  of  Ecclesiastical  History. 

The  Professor  of  Irish. 

The  Professor  of  Comparative  Anatomy  to  Medical  Students. 
Four  Lectures  of  — 

The  Professor  of  Natural  and  Experimental  Philosophy, 

The  Professor  of  Oratory. 

DONNELLAN  LECTUKKS. 

Tiie  Donnellan  Lecture  was  founded  by  the  Board  on 
February  22,  1794,  in  order  to  carry  out  the  intentions  of 
Mrs.  Anne  Donnellan,  of  the  parish  of  St.  George,  Hanover- 
square,  County  Middlesex,  spinster,  who  bequeathed  £1243  to 
the  College  "  for  the  encouragement  of  religion,  learning,  and 
good  manners ;  the  particular  mode  of  application  being  left  to 
the  Provost  and  Senior  Fellows." 

The  regulations  originally  drawn  up  by  the  Hoard  with  respect 
to  this  Lecture  have  been  altered  from  time  to  time,  so  that  they 
are  now  as  follows :  — 

Tlie  appointment  of  the  Lecturer  is  made  by  invitation  of  the 
Board,  one  year  in  advance,  on  a  day  not  later  than  the  last 
Saturday  in  November  in  each  year 

The  subject  is  agreed  upon  by  the  Board  and  the  Lecturer,  and 
treated  of  in  not  less  tlian  three  Lectures,  which  are  delivered  in 
one  of  the  public  Halls  of  the  College. 

The  salary  of  the  Lecturer  consists  of  the  interest  on  £1200 
for  one  year,  amounting  to  about  £65,  and  is  paid  to  him,  after 
he  shall  have  delivered  the  whole  number  of  Lectures,  by  tlie 
Bursar,  at  such  times  and  in  such  sums  as  the  interest  is 
received. 

Lecturer  for  1923. — Reginald  Arthur  Percy  Rogers,  m.a. 
Subject. — Some   Tlieories   of   Space  and  Time  and  the   Relation 
between  Mind  and  Body. 


(     152     ) 


The  rules  determining  the  conditions  of  election  to  Fellowship 
are  set  forth  in  Chap.  VII.  of  the  College  Statutes,  and  have  been 
modified  by  the  following  Ordinances  : — 

EXTRACT  FROM  AN  ORDINANCE  CONCERNING  THE  ELECTION 
OF  FELLOWS,  &C. 

[May  24,  1920,] 

Elections  to  Fellowship  shall  be  heU  as  frequently  as  the  Board  shall 
from  time  to  time  decide  to  be  requisite  for  the  maintenance  of  a 
guflScient  staff  of  teachers,  and  in  the  general  interest  of  tlie  College, 
but  so  that  the  total  number  of  FelloM-s — Senior  and  Junior — shall  not 
bo  allowed  to  fall  permanently  below  twenty-seven  (exclusive  of 
P/ofessors  elected  to  Fellowsliip  under  the  provision  of  1  Geo.  V,  4  (7)  (e), 
and  of  Honorary  Fellows).  And  if  in  any  year  the  number  of  Fellows 
shall  by  the  resignation,  retirement,  or  death  of  one  or  more  Fellows 
fall  below  twenty-seven,  then  the  Board  shall  not  later  tlian  the  first 
day  of  October  next  following  take  sti;ps  towards  the  election  of  one  or 
more  Fellows  to  make  up  the  number,  either  according  to  the  method 
hereinafter  descrihed  or  under  the  power  of  electing  without  examina- 
tion conferred  by  the  Ordinance  of  March  29th,  1916. 

Except  in  the  cases  of  election  under  the  Ordinance  of  March  29th, 
1916,  and  of  the  election  of  Professors  to  Fellowship  under  the  provision 
of  1  Geo.  V,  4  (7)  (e),  and  of  the  election  of  Honoraiy  Fellows,  all 
Fellows  shall  he  elected  in  the  following  manner  : 

Not  less  than  six  months  before  Trinity  Monday  of  any  year  in  which 
the  Board  shall  determine  to  hold  an  election  to  Fellowship,  the  Board 
shall  give  public  notice  of  the  subject  or  subjects  in  wliich  they  propose  to 
elect  a  Fellow  or  Fellows.  Only  such  persons  shall  be  eligible  as  have 
held  a  Lectureship  or  Assistanlship  in  the  University  of  IJublin  for  at 
least  two  years,  or  shall  have  received  special  permission  from  the  Board 
to  offer  themselves  for  election.  In  electing  to  these  Fellowsliips  the 
Board  shall  have  regard  to  the  attainments  and  qualifications  of  each 
candidate  agreeably  to  the  Statutes  of  the  College,  and  to  the  ability 
M'hich  he  has  shown  as  a  Lecturer,  and  to  the  requirements  of  the 
College  at  the  time,  as  well  as  to  the  results  of  the  examination  refeixed 
to  in  (a)  and  (i). 

(a)  The  fitness  of  the  candidates  shall  be  examined  shortly  before  the 
date  of  election  in  such  subjects  and  in  such  manner  as  the  Board  shall 
in  each  case  determine  by  Examiners  appointed  for  that  purpose. 

(b)  The  Examiners  shall  report  to  the  Board  on  the  merits  of  each 
candidate,  and  the  Board  shall  after  considering  their  report  proceed  to 
election  in  the  form  and  manner  prescribed  by  the  Statutes  :  but  if  in 
the  judgment  of  a  majority  of  the  Board  sufficient  merit  has  not  been 
shown  no  candidate  shall  be  elected. 


FfiLtOWSHtP.  153 


OUDIIfANCi-;  EMPOWKKING  THE  BOARD  TO   ELECT  FEIJ.OWS  WITHOUT 
EXAMINATION. 

[March  29,  i916.'j 

It  is  ordained  by  the  Board  of  Trinity  College,  Dublin,  with  the 
written  assent  of  a  miijorily  of  the  Fellows  and  the  approval  of  the 
Visitors,  tliat  election  to  Fellowship  may  be  made  by  the  Board  as  may 
to  them  seem  advisable  in  the  interests  of  the  College,  not  ofiener  than 
once  in  three  years,  after  an  estimate  of  the  merit  of  candidates  without 
examinati(m,  such  candidates  to  be  otherwise  qualified  according  to  the 
statutes:  pi'ovided  always  that  Fellows  so  elected  shall  liave  priority 
on  the  Roll  of  Fellows  according  to  priority  of  election  :  and  that  for 
the  purpose  of  giving  effect  to  this  ordinance  the  following  rules  shall 
be  adopted  and  published,  that  is  to  say  : — 

Not  oftcner  than  once  in  three  years  a  Fellowship  may  be  awarded 
on  grounds  of  distinguished  merit,  as  shown  primarily  by  the  candidate's 
published  work:  provided  always  that  no  person  shall  be  elected  to  such 
a  Fellowship  witiiout  the  assent  of  a  majority  of  tlie  Fellows.  In 
regard  to  such  elections  the  Board  shall  announce  beforehand  what 
subject  or  subjects  will  be  regarded  as  most  important,  and  shall  be 
guided  by  the  requirements  of  the  College  at  tlie  time,  and  assisted  by 
the  report  of  a  committee  to  be  appointed  by  the  Board  to  advise  the 
Board  upon  the  merits  of  the  candidates.  On  this  committee  experts 
additional  to  those  upon  the  College  staff  may  be  invited  to  serve.  A 
candidate  shall  be  selected  by  the  Board  after  they  have  considered  the 
report  of  tlie  Committee,  and  the  Board  shall  elect  as  toon  as  the 
required  assent  of  the  nuijority  of  the  Fellows  has  been  obtained. 

Before  the  day  of  election  every  Candidate  for  Fellowship 
must  send  to  the  Provost  his  name,  and  the  name  of  the  county  in 
which  he  was  born. 


FOUNDATION  SCHOLARSHIPS. 

Men  are  elected  to  Scholarships  for  merit  in  Classics  or  in 
Mathematics  or  in  Experimental  Science  or  in  Modern  Languages 
or  in  Natural  Science  or  in  History  and  Political  Science, 
or  in  Mental  and  Moral  Philosophy.  In  order  to  distinguish 
them  from  the  holders  of  other  Scholarships,  they  are  termed 
Scholars  of  the  House,  or  Scholars  on  the  Foundation.  The 
number  of  such  Scholars  is  seventv,  and  they  have  important 
privileges.  They  receive  from  the  College  an  annual  salary 
of  £20  Irish  money  ;  they  have  their  commons  free  of  expense, 
and  their  rooms  for  half  the  charge  paid  by  other  Students.* 

•..Tliis  does  not  apply  to  that  portion  of  the  rent  imposed  to  defray  expenses  incuiTed 
in  papering  or  painting. 

113 


154  SCHOLARSHIPS. 

The  tuition  fees  of  Pensioners  who  are  elected  to  Scholarships 
is  one  guinea  per  quarter,  and  of  Fellow-Commoners,  two 
guineas.  They  hold  their  Scholarships  until  the  end  of  the 
June  Quarter  of  the  fifth  year  following  their  election,  or 
following  the  time  at  which  they  become  or  might  have  become 
Masters  of  Arts,  whichever  period  terminates  first.  All  fees 
payable  by  Scholars  for  Tuition  terminate  after  the  quarter 
in  which  they  take  the  Degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts. 

Exhibitions  awarded  to  Scholars. 

Any  .Scholar  who  has  not  dropped  a  Class  after  the  Michaelmas 
Examination  of  his  Junior  Sophister  year,  nor  dropped  more  than 
one  Class,  and  who  obtains  a  Senior  Moderatorship  at  the  Degree 
Examination,  and  does  not  obtain  one  of  the  Studentships,  is 
awarded  one  of  certain  Exhibitions  of  small  value,  to  which 
Students  are  appointed  by  the  Board,  if  such  be  then  vacant,  and 
such  further  Exhibition  as  shall  raise  the  entire  annual  value 
of  his  Exhibition  to  £10.  The  Exhibition  is  tenable  for  three 
years,  provided  the  holder's  Scholarship  lasts  so  long. 

Waiterships. 

Before  and  after  meat,  grace  was  formerly  said  by  certain  of  the 
Scholars  in  turn,  who  were  called  Waiters.  This  obligation  was 
done  away  with  by  the  Act  36  Victoria,  chapter  21. 

Ten  Scholars,  or  other  Students,  are  now  annually  appointed 
to  say  grace  before  and  after  meat  in  the  Commons  Hall,  on  the 
following  conditions : — 

1.  They  shall  each  receive  a  salary  of  £10  per  annum,  to  be  paid 
quarterly,  if  the  duty  has  been  satisfactorily  discharged. 

2.  They  shall  be  annually  selected  by  the  two  Deans,  and  the  names 
of  those  selected  shall  be  submitted  to  the  Board  for  appointment  to  the 
office. 

3.  Kegard  shall  be  had,  in  the  selection,  to  the  general  character  of  the 
Student  for  regularity,  steadiness,  and  general  good  conduct,  as  such 
qualities  are  the  best  security  that  the  duties  of  the  office  will  be  properly 
discharged. 

The  grace  must  be  repeated  memoriter  and  in  Latin,  in  a  form 
prescribed  by  the  Statutes  of  the  College. 

Keeping  of  Terms  by  Scholars. 

The  following  Rules  have  been  passed  by  the  Board,  with  regard 
to  the  attendance  by  Scholars  at  Lectures : — 

I.  Graduates. — All  Scholars  who  have  actually  passed  the 
B.  A.  Degree  Examination  are  exempted  from  suspension  for 
non-attendance  at  Lectures. 


SCUOLAkSHIPS.  155 

il.  Underyraduates. — 1.  Every  Undergraduate  Scholar  shall  be 
required  to  keep  each  Terra,  by  attendance  either  at  Lectures,  or  the 
subsequent  Examination,  on  pain  of  being  conditionally  suspended. 

2.  Full  attendance  on  the  Lectures  of  the  University  Professors, 
such  as  would  prove  that  an  Undergraduate  Scholar  is  engaged  bond 
fide  in  preparation  for  the  Moderatorship  or  Indian  Civil  Service 
Examinations,  or  in  professional  studies,  shall  be  held  sufficient 
to  exempt  him  from  suspension  for  that  Term. 

3.  Any  Undergraduate  Scholar  who  shall  have  been  conditionally 
suspended  under  the  foregoing  rule  shall  be  restored  on  obtaining 
an  Honor  at  a  subsequent  Examination. 

4.  Any  Undergraduate  Scholar  who  shall  remain  conditionally 
suspended  for  three  Terms  shall  absolutely  forfeit  his  salary  for 
the  past  year,  unless  he  shall  produce  to  the  Board  satisfactory 
excuses  for  his  neglect. 

5.  No  student  can  compete  for  a  Scholarship  until  after  his 
name  has  been  entered  on  the  College  books  as  a  Junior  Fresh- 
man, i.e.  he  cannot  compete  as  a  risiny  Junior  Freshman. 
(See   "  Course  in  Arts,"  §  5.) 

6.  Any  Scholar  who  shall  fail  to  keep  the  Terms  and  Exami- 
nations necessary  to  enable  him  to  proceed  with  his  Class  shall 
ijiso  facto  forfeit  his  Scholarship,  and  no  Scholar  can  have  his 
name  transferred  to  a  lower  Class  without  the  express  permis- 
sion of  the  IJoard. 


NON-FOUNDATION    SCHOLAKSHIPS   FOK   WO.MKN. 

As  the  Foundation  Scholarships  in  Trinity  College  are  tenable 
only  by  men,  and  it  was  desirable  that  Scholarships  should  be 
established  for  women  : 

It  was  decreed  by  the  Hoard,  with  the  approval  of  the 
Council  and  the  consent  of  the  Visitors,  in  Michaelmas  Terra, 
1904: 

I.  That  Scholarships  shall  be  established  for  women. 

II.  That,  with  the  approval  of  the  Council,  the  subjects  of 
Examination  for  such  ScFiolarships  shall  be  the  sarae  as  for  the 
Foundation  Scholarships  hereinbefore  raentioned,  and  that  the 
Examinations  for  both  shall  be  held  at  the  same  time  and  place. 

III.  That  the  value  of  such  Scholarships  shall  be  £30  a  year, 
with  exemption  from  ordinary  College  Fees,  save  the  Tuition  Fees 
of  one  guinea  per  quarter  for  which  the  Foundation  Scholars  are 
at  present  liable. 

IV.  That  the  period  of  tenure  of  such  Scholarships,  and  the 
period  during  which  the  Tuition  Fees  shall  continue  to  be  payable, 
shall  be  the  same  as  in  the  case  of  the  Foundation  Scholarships. 

/ 


156 


SCHOLARSHIPS. 


3Imle  of  Election . 


1.  Ou  or  before  the  day  of  election  every  Candidate  for  Scholar- 
ship must  send  to  each  member  of  the  Board  or  to  the  Registrar, 
his  name,  and  the  name  of  the  county  in  which  he  was  born. 
The  form  in  which  this  is  generally  done  is  as  follows : 

Ego,  A.B.  filius,  natusin  comitatu  N.,  sub  ferula educatus, 

Discipulatum  a  te  humillime  peto. 

No  Candidate  for  Scholarship  will  be  regarded  as  eligible  unless 
he  has  paid  the  April  current  half-yearly  fee  of  his  class.  This 
rule  not  to  apply  to  Sizars. 

2.  The  Examination  for  Scholarships  is  held  on  such  days,  not 
being  less  than  four  in  number,  in  the  seven  week  days  preceding 
the  commencement  of  Lectures  in  Trinity  Term,  as  the  Board 
shall  fix  and  promulgate,  at  least  ten  months  beforehand. 

3.  Candidates  for  Scholarships  in  Mathematics  are  examined  in 
all  the  Pure  and  Applied  Mathematics  of  the  Undergraduate  Honor 
Course  for  which  a  Junior  Sophister  Student  would  have  been  liable 
from  his  entrance  up  to  the  Trinity  Examination  of  the  Junior 
Sophister  year  inclusive.  In  the  Examination  equal  weight  is 
assigned  to  Pure  and  to  Applied  Mathematics. 

4.  Candidates  for  Scholarships  in  Experimental  Science  are 
examined  in  the  Honor  Courses  in  Experimental  Science  for  the 
J\inior  and  Senior  Freshman  years,  and  for  the  Hilary  and 
'Jrinity  Honor  Examinations  of  the  Junior  Sophister  year. 

Examination  Papers  are  set  in  (a)  Mathematics,  (6)  Experi- 
mental Physics,  (c)  Chemistry,  and  a  Practical  Examination  is 
held  in  both  Experimental  Physics  and  Chemistry ;  100  marks 
each  are  allotted  to  (a),  (6),  and  (c),  and  50  marks  to  each  of  the 
two  Practical  Examinations. 

The  Course  in  (a)  Mathematics  is  based  on  the  Course  in 
Experimental  Physics  extending  so  far  as  is  necessary  for  the 
proper  study  of  Experimental  Science,  and  including  Elementary 
Analytical  Geometry,  Elementary  Differential  and  Integral  Cal- 
culus, a  knowledge  of  the  simple  harmonic  function,  Mechanics, 
Hydrostatics,  and  Geometrical  Optics. 

5.  Candidates  for  Scholarships  in  Classics  are  examined  in  all 
the  Classics  of  the  Undergraduate  Honor  Course  for  which  a 
Junior  Sophister  Student  would  have  been  liable  from  his  entrance 
up  to  and  including  the  Trinity  Examinationof  the  Junior  Sophister 
year.     The  Course  for  viim  voce  Examination  is  as  follows: — 

Greek  Prose  Authors,  .         .     Plato  :  Gorgias. 

Demosthenes  :  De  Corona. 
Thucydides :  Book  vii. 


SCHOLAKStllPS. 


157 


Greek  Poets, 


Latin  Prose  Authors, 
Latin  Poets, 


Homer  :  Iliad,  Books  xxi.,  xxii.,  xxiii., 

XXIV. 

Homer:   Odyssey,   Books  vi.,  ix.,   xxi., 

XXII. 

Sophocles  :  Ajax,  Antigone,  Pbiloctetes. 
Euripides  :  Medea,  liacchae,  Troades. 

Livy  :  Books  xxi.,  xxii. 
Tacitus  :  Histories,  Books  i.,  ii. 

Virgil:  Aeneid  vii.,  viii.,  ix. 

Horace. 

Tennce :  Adelphi,  Phormio. 

Plautus :  Trinummus,  Captivi. 

Juvenal  :  Satires,  i.,  iii.,  iv.,  vii.,  viii., 

X.,  XIII..   XIV. 

Persius :  Satires,  i,  ii,  iii,  v,  vi. 


They  are  also  examined  in  Greek  and  Latin  Composition,  in 
English  Composition,  in  Greek  and  Roman  History,  and  in  Com- 
parative Pliilology.     The  Course  in  History  is  : — 

Bury,  .         .     History  of  Greece. 

How  and  Leigh,        History  of  Rome. 

Bury,  .         .     Student's  Roman  £mpire,  Chaps.  1-25. 

Together  M'ith  the  lectures  of  the  Professor  of  Ancient  History  and 
Classical  Archaeology  in  Ancient  History  and  Classical  Archaeology 
during  the  two  academic  years  preceding  each  examination. 

The  Course  in  Comparative  Philology  is  : — 

Edmond's  Comparative  Philology,  chaps.  7,  8,  and  9,  together  with 
the  special  lectures  of  the  Professor. 

The  Viva  Voce  Course  is  divided  among  eight  Examiners. 
Greek  and  Latin  Verse  Composition  are  both  compulsory  suhjects. 
The  numbers  assigned  as  marks  to  the  various  subjects  of  Exami- 
nation are  as  follows : — 

Marks. 


4  Papers  of  Passages,      .... 

60 

8  Marks  for  Viva  Voce, 

SO 

4  Greek  and  Latin  Compositions,    . 

60 

English  Essay  on  Classical  subject. 

15 

Critical  Paper, 

30 

Historical  Paper, 

40 

Philology  Paper, 

15 

300 


158 


SCilOLABSfllPS; 


The  subjects  of  Examination  for  Scholarships  in  Classics  at  the 
several  hours  are  arranged  as  follows : — 


FiKST  Daa-, 


Second  Day, 


Third  Day, 


Fourth  Day, 


!  Morning,  .      Greek  Prose  Authors  (with   vivd   voce 
concurrently). 
Afternoon,  .   Greek    Poets    (with     vivd    voce    con- 
^  currently). 

S  Morning,  .  .  Latin   Prose   Authors  (with   vivd  voce 
concurrently). 
Afternoon,   ,  Latin     Poets     (with    vivd    voce    con- 
l  currently). 

/Morning,  .  .  Historical  Paper  (two  hours). 

\  Philology  Paper  (one  hour) . 

<  Afternoon,    .  English  Essay  on  a  Classical  subject 

(one    hour)  ;     Critical    Paper    (two 

hours) . 

'Morning,  .  Greek  Prose  Composition  (one  hour 
and  a  half) ;  Greek  Verse  Composi- 
tion (one  hour  and  a  half). 
Afternoon,  .  Latin  Prose  Composition  (one  hour  and 
a  half) ;  Latin  Verse  Composition 
(one  hour  and  a  half). 


7.  Candidates  for  Scholarships  in  Modern  Languages  are  re- 
quired to  compete  in  two  of  tlie  three  languages,  French,  German, 
Italian.  In  French  they  will  be  examined  in  all  the  works  of 
Corueille,  Racine,  Moliere,  Hugo,  and  Balzac  prescribed  in  the 
Undergraduate  Honor  Course  up  to  and  including  the  Trinity 
Honor  Examination  for  Junior  Sophisters,  and  in  German  they 
will  be  examined  in  all  the  books  so  prescribed,  with  the  exception 
of  Gothic  and  Old  High  German.  In  Italian  they  will  be 
examined  in  all  the  books  so  prescribed,  with  the  exception  of 
Petrarca,  Saunazaro,  and  Torraca. 

An  English  Kssay  relating  to  the  subjects  of  the  Examination 
will  be  required,  and  will  have  considerable  weight  iu  the 
Election. 

Women  candidates  for  Scholarships  in  Modern  -Languages 
must  not  have  passed  the  Degree  Examination. 

8.  The  examination  includes  the  following  subjects  : — 

(«)  Prescribed  books,  as  above  (see  pp.  111-117). 

{b)  Composition  in  the  two  languages  selected. 

{c)  Translation  at  sight  from  the  two  languages  selected. 

(d)  An  English  Essay. 

(e)  A  Vivd  Voce  examination  in  the  two  languages  selected. 


Scholars  UIP8. 


159 


100 
100 


100 


100 
100 


100 


The  following  is  tlie  scheme  of  papers  and  marks  for  this 
examination,  which  will  begin  at  llie  same  time  as  that  for 
Classical  Scholarships ; — 

Marks. 
First  Morning  :   Englisli  Essay,     ....     100 
First  A  fternoon  :  French  and  German  Translation 

(two  papers), 100  +  100 

S(  cond  Morning  :   French  Composition, 

Second    Afternoon  :     French    Prescribed    Books 

(Paper  I), 

Tiiird  Morning  :  French  Prescribed  Buoks  (Paper 

II),  and    Viva  Voce, 100  +  50 

Third    Afternoon  :     German    Prescribed    Books 

(Paper  I),        .  100 

Fourtli  Morning:  German  Composition,         .         •     100 
Fourth    Afternoon  :      German    Prescribed    Books 

(Paper  II),  and  Vivd  Voce,     .         .         .         .100  +  50 
Fifth  Morning  :   Italian  Composition,    . 
Fifth     Afternoon  :     Italian     Prescribed     Books 

CJ'aperl), 

Sixth  Morning  :    Italian  Prescribed  Books  (Paper 

II),  and  Vivd  Voce, 100  +  50 

Sixth  Afternoon  :  Italian  Translation  (2-3.30),      .     100 

Total  for  two  languages  and  English  Essay,  .        .         1000 

9.  Candidates  for  Scholarship  in  Natnral  Science  are  examined 
in  the  Honor  Courses  in  Natural  Science  for  the  Junior  Freshman 
and  Senior  Freshman  Years,  and  for  the  Hilary  and  Trinity 
Honor  Examinations  of  the  Junior  Sophister  year. 

In  each  of  the  three  Divisions  of  Natural  Science,  i.e.  Zoology, 
Botany,  and  Geology,  two  papers  are  set.  Tliere  is,  in  addition, 
a  practical  examination  in  each  Division.  The  papers  in  the 
several  Divisions  and  the  marks  assigned  to  them  are  allocated 
as  follows  ; — 

Zoologi/:     Morphology     100;     Physiology    and    Histology    100; 

Practical    100. 
Botany:    Morphology  100  ;  Physiology  100  ;  Practical  100. 
Geology:    Physical    Geology   100;    Stratigraphicul  Geology  100; 
Practical  100. 

10.  Candidates  for  Scholarships  in  History  and  Political  Science 
are  examined  as  follows :  — 

Six  papers  will  be  set  for  the  Examination,  the  subjects  of 
which  are : — 


I.  General  Modern  History,  416-1404, 
II.  General  Modem  History,  1.94-1815, 

III.  English  and  Irish  History,  449-1815, 

IV.  Constitutional  History, 

V.  Economic  and  Social  History, 
VI.  Essays  upon  general  subjecte  related  to  the 
Course,  .  .  .  . 


Marks. 
150 
200 
150 
200 
150 

150 


1000 


l60  SCttOLAtlSHlPg. 

On  Papers  I.  to  V.,  passages  in  French  aud  German  may  be  sot 
to  test  the  candidate's  capacity  fur  readinjj  Modern  Languages. 

I.  General  Modern  History  (476-149J).— *Previte  Orton : 
Outlines  ot  Mediajval  History.  *Bryce :  Holy  Homan  Empire. 
Curtis  :  Roger  of  Sicily.  Philippe  de  Comines  :  Memoires. 
Lavisse  et  Rambaud  :  Histoire  generale,  vol.  i.,  chaps.  4  and  13  ; 
vol.  ii.,  chap,  15;  vol.  iii.,  chap.  16.  Henderson:  Select  Docu- 
ments of  the  Middle  Ages,  pp.  169-439. 

II.  General  Modern  Hintory  (1494-1815). — *Last  three 
volumes  of  the  "Six  Ages  of  European  History"  (Ed.  A.  H. 
Johnson).  Gardiner :  Thirty  Years'  War.  Johnston  :  History 
of  the  French  Revolution.  Rose  :  Napoleonic  Studies.  Lavisse 
et  Uambaud  :  Histoire  generale,  vol.  iv.,  chaps.  10,  11,  and  12; 
vol.  v.,  chap.  1  ;  vol.  vi.,  chap.  4.  Cambridge  Modern  History  : 
vol.  vii.,  chaps,  '-i  and  4. 

III.  English  and  Irish  History  (449-1815)— *Green :  Short 
History  of  the  English  People  (latest  edition)  *Walpole:  Short 
History  of  Irehind.  *Oman  :  England  before  the  Norman 
Conquest,  pp.  186-245.  Dunlop  :  Henry  VIII. 's  Irish  Policy. 
Innes :  Ten  Tudor  Statesmen.  Gardiner :  History  of  England 
(160:5-1642),  chaps.  9,  10,  18,  75,  76,  81,  and  101.  Political 
History  of  England  (ed.  Hunt)  :  vols.  vii.  and  x.  Burke  : 
Speeches  on  America.  Cambridge  Modern  History :  vol.  vi., 
chap.  14  ;  vol.  ix.,  chap.  22. 

IV.  Constitutional  History. — *White  :  Making  of  the  Knglisli 
Constitution.  *Dale  :  Principles  of  English  Constitutional 
History.  Medley  :  Original  Illustrations  of  English  Consti- 
tutional History.  Stubbs  :  Constitutional  History  of  England, 
vol.  ii.,  chaps.  14,  15,  and  16.  Hallam  :  Constitutional  History 
of  England  ;  Middle  Ages,  chap.  8.  May  :  Constitutional  History 
of  England,  vol.  i.,  chaps.  1,  2,  5,  and  6. 

V.  Economic  and  Social  History. — *Ashley  :  Economic  Organi- 
sation of  England.  *.\leredith  :  Economic  History  of  England. 
JSeebohm:  English  Village  Community  (chups.  1-5  inclusive). 
Unwin  :  Industrial  <  >rganisation.  Rand  :  Selections  illustrating 
Economic  History.  Cambridge  .Modern  History  :  vol.  x.,  chaps,  i'-i 
and  24 ;  vol.  xi.,  chap.  i.  ;  vol.  xii.,  chap.  23. 

N.B. — Those  books  which  are  marked  with  an  asterisk  are 
especially  recommended,  the  rest  may  be  consulted  upon  particular 
points. 


J 


SCHOLAKSHIPS.  161 

11.  Candidates  for  Scholarship  in  Mental  and  Moral  Philosophy 
will  undergo  a  written  Examination  in  the  following  seven 
subjects : — 

1.  Logic. 

2.  Psychology. 

3.  Modern  Pre- Kantian  Philosophy. 

4.  Kant's  Critique  of  Pure  Reason. 

5.  History  of  Philosophy. 

6.  The  Elements  of  Ethics. 

7.  A  special  work  : — 

For  1923,  M'Dougall,  Body  and  Mind. 

On  the  morning  of  the  fourth  day  of  the  Examination  the 
Candidates  will  be  examined  viva  voce.  100  marks  will  be 
allotted  to  each  paper,  and  100  marks  to  the  viva  voce. 

Course  of  Reading  recommended : — 

James  :  Text-book  of  Psychology. 

R.  A.  P.  l^ogers :  Short  history  of  Ethics. 

And  the  Books  recommended  for  the  Freshmen  and  Junior 
Sopliister  rears  of  the  Honor  Courses  in  Mental  and  Moral 
Philosophy. 


(     162    ) 


anb  Jiwal  Jrcsbman  fominatiou. 


STUDENTSHIPS. 

Two  Studentships  of  the  value  of  £100  a  year  for  five  years  are 
awarded  each  Michaelmas  Term,  in  accordance  with  the  following 
regulations  : — 

I.  One  student  is  elected  from  among  the  Senior  Moderators 
in  Mathematics  and  one  from  among  the  Senior  Moderators  in 
Classics. 

II.  (1)  In  addition  to  their  answering  in  the  primary  Courses, 
Mathematics  and  Classics,  the  answering  of  the  Candidates  in  one 
other  Moderatorship  Course  is  taken  into  account. 

(2)  Those  who  take  Mathematics  as  a  primary  Course  may  take 
Classics  as  their  secondary  Course,  and  vice  versa. 

(3)  The  weight  assigned  to  the  Primary  and  Secondary 
Courses  respectively  is  in  the  proportion  of  3  to  2. 

(4)  A  minimum  (of  one-fourth  of  the  total  weight  of  each  Course) 
is  lixed  ;  and  the  merit  of  Candidates  is  measured  by  the  excess 
of  their  answering  above  that  minimum. 

III.  No  Undergraduate  who  has  dropped  a  class  after  the 
Michaelmas  Examination  in  his  Junior  Sophister  year,  or  who 
has  dropped  more  than  one  class  since  Matriculation,  is  eligible 
for  a  Studentship. 

IV.  The  Board  has  power  to  decline  to  elect  to  a  Studentship, 
or  to  award  a  Studentship  of  reduced  value,  in  case  of  insufficient 
merit;  and  also  to  divide  the  emoluments  of  a  Studentship  in 
cases  of  equality  or  closeness  of  answering  between  the  candidates, 

V.  Holders  of  Studentships  are  required  to  lecture  in  the 
College  one  hour  a  day  during  Term,  unless  specially  exempted 
by  the  Board. 

VI.  If  a  person  holding  a  Studentship  is  elected  to  a  Fellow- 
ship of  Trinity  College,  Dublin,  or  of  any  College  in  the  Univer- 
sities of  Oxford  or  Cambridge,  his  Student^hip  is  thereupon 
vacated. 

No  change  will  be  made  in  these  regulations  without  a  year's 
notice. 


MODBKATOESHIP  PBIZES.  163 


MODERATOKSHIP   PHIZES. 

iN  addition  to  the  two  Studentships  which  are  annually  filled 
up,  Prizes  of  value  not  less  than  £50  may  be  awarded  to 
Students  who  shall  have  specially  distinguished  themselves  at 
the  Moderatorship  Examinations,  but,  in  general,  conditions  as 
to  research  or  study  will  be  imposed  upon  those  to  wliom  the 
award  is  made. 


THE    KING    EDWARD    PRIZE. 

A  Prize  of  £10  was  instituted  by  the  Board  in  1903  in  com- 
memoration of  the  visit  of  His  Majesty  King  Edward  VII  to 
Trinity  College  in  that  year. 

It  is  awarded  to  the  best  answerer  among  the  Respondents  at 
the  Degree  Examination  held  in  the  month  of  December,  who 
shall  have  answered  in  the  whole  Course,  and  have  not  been 
given  any  special  concession  or  privilege.  No  student  is  eligible 
who  has  dropped  more  than  one  class  during  liis  Undergraduate 
Course,  or  who  has  dropped  a  class  after  the  Michaelmas 
Examination  of  his  Junior  iSophister  year. 


BROOKE  PRIZES. 

In  1879  Prizes  were  founded  by  the  Misses  Brooke  to  be  given 
annually  to  the  Candidates  for  Moderatorship  who  rank  next  in 
order  to  the  Moderators  who  are  elected  Students  for  Mathematics 
and  for  Classics. 

The   Fund  yields  annually    about  £8!>  ;    and  the  Prizes  are 
payable  in  half-yearly  instalments  in  March  and  September. 


JELLETT  PRIZES  FOR  GENERAL  ANSWERING. 

The  Rev.  John  Hewitt  Jellett,  D.D.,  late  Provost  of  Trinity 
College,  awarded  Prizes  for  General  Answering  from  1884  to 
1887.  In  the  year  1889  the  Rev.  George  Salmon,  D.D., 
Provost  of  Trinity  College,  provided  a  fund  for  the  payment 
of  these  Prizes.  The  Prizes  are  awarded  under  the  following 
Regulations : — 

Two  Prizes  for  General  Answering  are   given  at  the   Final 
Freshman  Examination  held  at  the  end  of  tlie  Trinity  Term  of 


164  SPECIAL  PRIZES. 

the  Senior  Freshman  year.  No  Student  is  eligible  for  either  of 
these  Prizes  who  shall  be  elected  to  a  Senior  Exhibition,  or  who 
is  excluded  by  the  College  liules  from  competing  for  a  Senior 
Exhibition.  Subject  to  these  exceptions,  the  Prizes  are  awarded 
to  the  two  Students  respectively  who  obtain  the  highest  aggregate 
of  marks  at  the  above-mentioned  Examination,  provided  that  this 
aggregate  be  not  less  than  65  per  cent,  of  the  total  amount  of 
marks  obtainable.  The  Fund  px'oduces  annually  about  £8.  This 
is  usually  divided  between  the  two  best  answerers  in  the  ratio  of 
5  to  3,  but,  in  case  of  equality  of  merit,  the  Board  may,  if  they 
think  fit,  award  a  Prize  of  £4  to  each  of  the  two  Students. 


S^mal  '§xm^. 


In  the  case  of  all  Prizes,  the  Board  reserve  the  power  of  diminishing  the 
amount  of  the  Prize,  or  withholding  it  altogether,  if  insufficient  merit 
has  been  shoivn  by  the  Candidates,  and,  in  the  case  of  Prizes  which  are 
payable  out  of  Special  Trust  Funds,  the  amount  will  further  depend  on 
the  dividends  in  hand. 


MADDEN  PRIZE 


PREMIUMS  AT  THE  EXAMINATIONS  FOR  FELLOWSHIPS. 

TuE  Board,  at  every  Fellowship  Examination,  grant  Premiums 
to  such  Candidates  as  appear  to  them  to  deserve  encouragement, 
and  in  such  proportions  as  they  consider  merited  by  the 
answering. 

By  the  will  of  Samuel  Molyneux  Madden,  dated  Ith  August,  1782, 
a  bequest  was  made  to  provide  a  prize  for  the  unsuccessful  candi- 
date for  Fellowship  in  any  year  who  shall  have  been  adjudged 
next  in  merit  to  the  Fellow  tlien  elected,  on  certain  conditions. 
Up  to  28th  April,  1894,  the  property  devised  under  the  will  was 
vested  in  named  individuals,  but  on  that  date  the  Provost, 
Fellows,  and  Scholars  were  appointed  trustees  by  a  decree  of  the 
Master  of  the  Holls.  Successive  schemes  for  the  administration 
of  the  fund  were  approved  by  the  Lord  Chancellor  in  1844,  and 
by  the  Master  of  tlie  Rolls  in  1921  ;  and  the  conditions  under 
which  the  Madden  Prize  is  now  awarded  are  the  following,  all 
the  conditions  formerly  prescribed  being  superseded  ; — 


MADDEN   PRIZE.  165 

1.  A  prize,  not  exceeding  four  hundred  pounds  Irish 
(£369  4s.  8f^.),  shall  be  awarded  at  the  Fellowship  Examina- 
tion to  the  candidate  adjudged  by  the  Board  to  be  next  in 
merit  to  the  candidate  then  elected  Fellow,  provided  that  in  the 
opinion  of  tlie  Board  he  is  "  meritorious." 

2.  It  is  in  the  power  of  the  Board  to  award  only  a  part  of  the 
prize  of  £369  4s.  8^/.,  or  to  divide  it  between  two  or  more  meri- 
torious candidates,  as  they  think  fit. 

3.  If  no  meritorious  candidate,  other  than  the  Fellow  then 
elected,  presents  himself,  the  Hoard  may  apply  the  amount  of  the 
Prize  for  tliat  year  either  («)  to  the  encouragement  af  research  in 
any  department  of  learning  by  students  of  Trinity  College,  or 
(6)  to  the  provision  of  a  Travelling  Scholarsliip  to  a  Graduate,  to 
enable  him  to  pursue  a  course  of  advanced  study  or  research. 

4.  The  surplus  of  the  revenue  of  the  fund,  in  excess  of 
£-}69  4».  8d.,  at  the  discretion  of  the  Board  from  year  to  year, 
may  (a)  be  applied  to  any  purpose  of  promoting  education,  study 
or  research  in  Trinity  College,  or  (i)  be  added  to  capital. 

0.  If  in  any  yearno  Fellowship  Examination  is  held,  the  Hoard 
may  either  [a)  add  the  revenues  of  the  fund  to  capital,  or 
(6)  apply  the  whole  or  any  part  of  the  revenues,  as  prescribed  in 
paragraphs  3  or  4;  provided  that  not  more  than  £369  4s.  8d.  is 
applied  to  the  purposes  of  paragraph  3,  and  that  only  the  excess 
of  the  revenue  over  £369  4s.  8d.  be  applied  as  in  paragraph  4. 

The  total  revenue  of  the  fund  is  now  about  £424. 


PRIZES  IN  SUBJECTS  CONNECTED  WITH  THE 
STUDY  OF  DIVINITY. 

[See  also  under  Divinity  School.] 


WALL  BIBLICAL  SCHOLARSHIPS. 

In  Michaelmas  Term,  1858,  the  Rev.  Charles  William  Wall,  U.D., 
Vice-Provost,  gave  to  the  Provost  and  Senior  Fellows  the  sum  of 
£2000,  for  the  purpose  of  founding  Biblical  Scholarships,  in  accord- 
ance with  certain  conditions  submitted  by  him  to  the  Board,  and 
approved.  Five  Scholarships  were  accordingly  founded  (to  be 
called  "The  Wall  Biblical  Scholarships"),  tenable  each  for  five 
years  from  the  date  of  election,  with  a  salary  of  £20  a  year,  one  to 
be  elected  annually  according  to  such  regulations  as  the  Provost  and 
Senior  Fellows  shall  from  time  to  time  enact,  in  conformity  with 
the  wishes  of  the  Founder,  as  recorded  in  the  Register  of  the  College. 


166  WALL   BIBLICAL   SCHOLARSHIPS. 

The  following  is  the  Course  for  Examination  for  the  year 
1923:— 

A. — Genesis,  39  to  end. 

In  the  Hebrew,  along  with  the  Greek,  Targura   and  Syriac 
(Peshitta)  Versions  of  the  same. 

B. — W.  "Wright's  "Lectures  on  the  Comparative  Grammar  of  the 
Semitic  Langiiages." 

Franz  Buhl's  "  Canon  and  Text  of  the  Old  Testament." 

T.  H.  Weir's  "  Short  History  of  the  Hebrew  Text  of  the  Old 
Testament." 

Swete's  "  Introduction  to  the  Old  Testament  in  Greek,"  Ch.  i,  ii,  in. 

Hastings'  Dictionary  of  the  Bible,  Articles— (1)  The  Septuagint ; 
(2)  Syriac  Versions;  (3)  Targums  ;  (4)  Samaritan  Pentateuch. 

a.  Duval's  "  La  liitterature  Syriaque." 

T.  K.  Abbott's  "  Essays  on  the  Text  of  the  Old  Testament." 

Chwolson's  "The  Quiescentes." 

The  Founder's  Essay,  "Proofs  of  the  Interpolation  of  the  Vowel- 
Letters  in  the  Text  of  the  Hebrew  Bible." 

The  examination  will  include  translation  of  unseen  pnssages,  com- 
position, and  pointing. 

The  Examination  for  the  present  year  will  be  held  in  Trinity 
Term.  The  names  of  Candidates  must  be  on  the  College  Books, 
and  their  standing,  reckoned  from  Entrance,  must  be  below  that 
of  M.A. 

Candidates  must  notify  the  Senior  Lecturer  in  Hilary  Term  on 
or  before  the  day  appointed  in  the  Calendar  (see  Almanac). 

The  Scholarships  are  paid  quarterly  by  the  Bursar. 


THE  ELRINGTON  THEOLOGICAL  PRIZE. 

This  Prize  was  founded  by  private  subscription  in  1837  in  memory 
of  the  late  Right  Eev.  Thomas  Klrington,  D.D.,  Mishop  of 
Leighlin  and  Ferns,  sometime  Provost. 

1.  It  is  awarded  for  the  best  theological  essay  written  by  a 
Graduate  of  not  more  than  eight  years'  standing. 

2.  The  subject  is  announced  two  years  in  advance. 

3.  The  examiners  are  the  Bishop  of  Ferns,  the  Provost,  and 
the  Regius  Professor  of  Divinity,  to  the  last  of  whom  the  essays, 
clearly  and  legibly  written,  with  lictitious  signatures,  are  to  be 
sent  before  the  first  day  of  November  in  each  year. 


ELUINGTON   THEOLOGICAI,   PKIZE.  167 

4.  The  amount  of  the  Prize  (which  may  be  divided  at  the 
discretion  of  the  Examiners)  is  about  £60,  of  which  at  least  half 
must  be  expended  upon  approved  theological  books,  at  the 
University  booksellers. 

5.  If  merit  is  not  shown,  the  Prize  may  he  withheld,  in  whole 
or  in  part. 

6.  No  candidate  can  obtain  the  Prize  more  than  once. 
Subject  for  1922.— St.  Paul's  use  of  the  Old  Testament. 
Subject  for  1923. — Beigson  and  Christianity. 

Subject  for  1924. — The  "Work  of  Irish  Missionaries  on  the  Continent. 


PRIZES  IN  BIBLICAL  GREEK. 

Thesk  are  open  to  all  Students  of  at  least  Junior  Sophister 
standing.  The  regulations  are  given  in  }  vi,  Prizes,  Divinity 
School. 


PRIZES  IN  ECCLESIASTICAL  HISTORY. 

These  are  open  to  all  Students  who  have  attended  the  Professor's 
Lectures  during  the  two  Terms  of  the  actual  year  in  which  they 
pi-esent  themselves  as  Candidates.  The  regulations  are  given  in 
§  vi,  Prizes,  Divinity  School. 


(     168     ) 


PRIZES  IN  MATHEMATICS. 


THE  LLOYD  EXHIBITIONS. 

T»i  1839  two  Exhibitions,  each  to  be  held  for  two  years  were 
J  AtA  w  tnhscriDtion,  in  memory  of  Dr.  Hartholomew  Lloyd, 
fomSe  ProtT'  T^^^^^  value  of  eLh  Exhibition  is  about  £15 
annually. 

1  The  Lloyd  Exhibition  is  awarded  to  that  Student  who  shall  be 
iuLd  bythlBoardto  have  answered  best  at  the  Michaelmas  Prize 
Examination  for  Junior  Sophisters  m  Mathematics. 

2.  No  Student  is  admissible  as  a  Candidate  a  second  time. 

Q    TV,o  Vvaminers  are  three  in  number,  who  are  chosen  by   the 

3    The  E'caminers  are  I     including  Erasmus  Smith's  Professor  of 

Semor  ^'^^^'^1%'^^^X  Profes  or^of  Natural  Philosophy ,  Erasmus 

Mathematics,  the  ^mvem  y  j,        .j^.^tal  Phil,  sophy,  AndreM-s' 

?™f,sor  of  TsSonom;  t^^^^  ^^^  ^^^r"  ''  '^' 

^niverSyP-SoHf' Natural  Philosophy,  and   any  other  persons 

nominated  by  the  Board. 

t^TaC^n-S^o^-fl^^^^^  ^«^^-^^  '' 

no  Candidate  of  sufficient  merit  presents  himself. 

5  The  Lloyd  Exhibition  is  tenable  only  so  long  as  the  holder's  name 
remains  on  the  College  Books. 


BISHOP  LAW'S  MATHEMATICAL  PRIZES. 

Fund  Prizes  are  annually  given. 

n  •         ^f  fon  nnA  £10   are  awarded  to  the  Junior 

(.)  Algebra,  including  Theory  of  Substitutions. 
(J)  Geometry  of  Algebraic  Curves  and  Surfaces. 


PRIZES  IN  UAIHEMA'I'ICS.  169 

(c)  Diflferential  Geometry. 

(d)  Calculus  of  Variations. 
(«)  Quaternions. 

(/)  Tlieory  of  Functions  of  a  Real  Variable,  including  Sets  of  Pointa, 
Lebesgue's  Integrals,  Fourier  Series. 

(ff)  Theory  of  Functions  of  a  Complex  Variable,  including  G}ie  of 
tlie  following  : — Gamma  and  Zeta  Functions,  Bessel  Functions,  Elliptic 
Functions. 

(/()  Integral  Equations, 

(«)  Linear  Differential  Equations. 

2.  Candidates  must  notify  Erasmus  Smith's  Professor  of  Mathe- 
ir.atics  of  their  intention  to  (ompete  on  or  before  Ut  April,  specifying 
the  subjects  in  which  they  propose  to  present  themselves. 

3.  The  Examiners  are  three  in  number,  who  are  chosen  by  the  Senior 
Lecturer  from  the  list  of  persons  named  above  in  the  Regulations  for 
Lloyd  Exhibitions. 

4.  If  merit  is  not  shown,  either  or  both  of  the  Prizes  may  be 
withheld. 

5.  The  sum  of  £10  is  paid,  in  turn,  to  Erasmus  Smith's  Professor  of 
Mathematics,  tlie  University  Professor  of  Natural  Philosophy,  and 
Andrews'  Professor  of  Astronomy,  that  he  may  entertain  the  Examiners 
at  diuner  on  the  day  that  the  Prizes  are  awarded. 


THE   M'CULLAGH    PRIZE. 

In  1854  a  Prize  of  £30  annually  viras  founded  by  subscription  in 
memory  of  James  M'CuUagh,  sometime  Fellow. 

1.  The  M'CuUagh  Prize  is  awarded  to  the  best  answerer  at  an 
Examination  held  in  Hilary  Term  in  a  special  Course  of  Mathematics 
or  Mathematical  Physics,  to  be  prescribed  from  year  to  year  by 
Erasmus  Smith's  Professor  of  Mathematics,  the  University  Professor 
of  Natural  Philosophy,  and  Andrews'  Professor  of  Astronomy. 

2.  The  competition  is  open  to  all  persons,  not  being  Fellows  of 
Trinity  College,  or  Professors  of  the  University,  whose  names  are  on 
the  College  Books  on  the  day  preceding  the  day  of  Examination. 

3.  No  person  can  gain  the  Prize  a  second  time. 

4.  The  Examiners  are  three  in  number,  who  are  chosen  by  the 
Senior  Lecturer  from  the  list  of  persons  named  above  in  the  Regula- 
tions for  the  Lloyd  Exhibitions. 

5.  If  merit  is  not  shown,  the  Prize  may  be  withheld  ;  and  if  merit  is 
shown  by  more  than  one  Candidate,  a  second  Prize  of  £10  may  be 
awarded. 

Subject  for  1923. — Hydrodynamics. 
Subject  for  1924.— Relativity. 

I 


170'  SPECIAL   PRIZES. 


THE  MICHAEL  ROBERTS  PRIZE. 

On  the  13th  June,  1883,  the  sum  of  £200  was  received  from 
Mrs.  Michael  Roberts  to  found  a  Prize  in  Mathematics,  to  be 
called  the  *' Michael  Roberts  Prize."  This  Prize  is  awarded  to 
the  Student  who,  having  passed  the  Final  Freshman  Examination, 
obtains  the  highest  marks  at  the  Mathematical  Prize  Examination 
for  Senior  Freshmen  in  Michaelmas  Term.  The  Fund  yields 
annually  about  £7. 


THE  TOWNSEND  MEMORIAL  PRIZE. 

In  1885  a  Prize,  to  be  called  "  The  Townsend  Memorial  Prize," 
was  founded  by  subscription  in  memory  of  the  Rev.  Richard 
Townsend,  m.a.,  sometime  Senior  Fellow.  It  is  awarded  annually 
to  the  Junior  Freshman  who  obtains  the  highest  aggregate  of 
marks  in  Mathematics  at  the  Michaelmas  Prize  Examination,  and 
at  either  the  Hilary  or  the  Trinity  Honor  Examinations. 

If,  in  the  opinion  of  the  Board,  sufficient  merit  has  not  been 
shown,  the  Prize  may  be  withheld,  and  its  amount  added  to  the 
capital  of  the  Fund. 

The  present  value  of  the  Prize  is  about  £23. 


CHARLES    WILKINS   MEMORIAL  PRIZE. 

In  1879  a  Prize,  to  be  called  the  "Charles  Wilkins  Memorial 
Prize,"  was  founded  by  subscription  in  memory  of  Charles  James 
Wilkins,  Scholar. 

It  is  of  the  value  of  £10,  and  is  awarded  annually  to  the  Woman 
Student  who  has  the  highest  aggregate  of  marks  for  her  answers 
at  the  Mathematical  part  of  the  Examination  for  Junior  Exhibi- 
tions and  at  a  special  Mathematical  Examination  held  in  the  same 
month  in  the  following  subjects  : — 

Binomial,  Exponential,  and  Logarithmic  Series. 
Geometrical  Properties  of  the  Parabola  and  Ellipse. 


(     171     ) 


PIUZES  I^^  CLASSICS. 


BISHOP  BERKELEY'S  GOLD  MEDALS. 

In  1752  a  benefaction  was  received  from  Dr.  George  Berkeley, 
Bishop  of  Cloyne,  sometime  Fellow,  for  the  provision  of  two  Gold 
Medals,  to  be  given  annually,  for  the  encouragement  of  the  study 
of  Greek. 

From  time  to  time  the  conditions  under  which  these  Medals 
are  awarded  have  been  altered,  and  the  present  regulations  are 
as  follows : — 

1.  Two  Berkeley  Medals  (first  and  second)  are  given  to  the  best 
answerers  at  an  Examination  in  the  Greek  Language  and  Literature, 
held  annually  in  Hilary  Term. 

2.  The  Examination  is  open  to  all  Students  under  M.A.  standing. 

3.  No  one  can  be  a  candidate  more  than  three  times,  nor  obtain  a 
Medal  more  than  once. 

4.  The  Course  is  announced  annually  by  the  Regius  Professor  of 
Greek. 

5.  The  Examination  is  conducted  by  the  Regius  Professor  of  Greek, 
the  Professor  of  Latin,  and  a  third  Examiner  appointed  by  the  Board. 

6.  Candidates  are  examined  in  Composition,  in  the  manner  of  the 
author  or  authors  who  are  prescribed. 

Subject  for  1923.— The  Odyssey  of  Homer. 
Subject  for  1924. — Herodotus. 


VICE-CHANCELLOR'S  LATIN   MEDALS. 

On  the  30th  of  January,  1869,  it  was  resolved  by  the  Provost 
and  Senior  Fellows  to  establish  an  annual  Examination  in  Latin, 
similar  to  that  held  for  the  Berkeley  Medals  in  Greek,  and  sub- 
ject to  the  same  Regulations.  Two  Gold  Medals,  called  "The 
Vice-Chancellor's  Latin  Medals,"  are  given  to  the  successful 
Candidates. 

The  Examination  is  held  annually  in  Michaelmas  Term,  on  a 
day  fixed  at  the  end  of  the  preceding  Trinity  Term,  after  due 
notice  has  been  received. 

Subject  for  1922.— Juvenal  and  Persius. 

Subject  for  1923. — Cicero's  Oradones  Verrinae  (including  the 
Livinalio  in  Caeciliurn). 

I  2 


172  SPECIAL   PKIZESi 


VICE-CHANCELLOR'S  PKIZES. 

The  Fund  from  which  these  Prizes  are  given  is  a  capital  sum  the 
interest  upon  which  represents  the  average  amount  of  graduation 
fees  paj-able  in  former  times  to  the  Vice-Chancellor. 

1.  Prizes  are  offered  annually,  open  to  all  Students  on  the  College 
Books  under  M.A.  standing,  for  the  best  Compositions  on  proposed 
subjects  in  English  Prose,  English  Verse,  Greek  or  Latin  Piose,  and 
Greek  or  Latin  Verse. 

2.  No  Prize  is  given  of  more  than  £20  ;  Prizes  of  less  amount,  and 
more  than  one  in  each  kind  of  Composition,  may  be  awarded  on  the 
recommendation  of  the  Examiners. 

3.  A  Student  cannot  obtain  a  Prize  oftener  than  twice  in  succession, 
or  than  three  times  during  his  College  Course. 

4.  The  subjects  for  Compositions  are  announced  before  June  1st; 
and  Compositions,  with  fictitious  signatures,  must  be  sent  to  the  Senior 
Lecturer  before  December  1st,  the  Prizes  being  declared  on  1st  Januaiy 
following. 

5.  The  Examiners  are  the  Regius  Professor  of  Greek,  the  Professor 
of  Latin,  and  the  Professor  of  English  Literature. 

Subjects  for  the  Prizes  to  be  awarded  in  January,  1923. 

Greek  or  Latin  Prose — "  Communism." 
Greek  or  Latin  Verse — "Delphi." 

The  Subjects  in  English  Prose  and  Verse  will  be  found  under 
the  head  "  Prizes  in  English." 


THE  FERRAR  MEMORIAL  PRIZE. 

In  1874  a  Prize,  to  be  called  "  The  Ferrar  Memoral  Prize,"  was 
founded  by  subscription  in  memory  of  the  Kev.  William  Hugh 
Ferrar,  M.A.,  sometime  Fellow. 

The  Prize  is  awarded  to  the  best  answerer  (provided  that 
sufficient  merit  is  shown)  at  a  special  examination  in  a  course  of 
Comparative  Philology,  held  in  Trinity  Term. 

The  competition  for  the  Prize  is  open  to  all  persons  under  M.A. 
standing — not  Fellows  of  the  College  or  Professors  of  the 
University — whose  names  shall  be  on  the  College  Books  on  the  day 
preceding  the  days  of  examination,  ^'o  person  who  has  won  the 
Prize  can  be  admitted  a  second  time  as  a  Candidate.  The  annual 
value  of  the  Prize  is  about  £17. 

The  Course  for  the  Examination  is — 

Edmond's  Comparative  Phihdogy. 

Wright's     Gothic     Grammar,     or,     Pevey's     Sanscrit      Primer 
(pages  1-80),  together  with  the  special  lectures  of  the  Professor. . 


PHIZES  IN   CLASSICS.  173 


THE  TYRRELL  MEMORIAL  MEDAL. 

In  1877  a  Gold  Medal  was  founded  by  subscription  in  memory 
of  William  Gerald  Tyrrell,  B.A,,  sometime  Scholar. 

1.  The  Medal  is  awarded  biennially  for  the  best  translations  of 
passages  into  Greek  Prose,  Latin  Prose,  Greek  Verse,  and  Latin  Verse. 

2.  The  passages  set  are  announced  in  November  each  alternate  year  ; 
and  the  compositions,  with  fictitious  signatures,  must  be  sent  to  the 
Senior  Lecturer  on  or  before  the  Ist  day  of  the  following  February. 

3.  The  competition  is  open  to  all  Students  under  the  standing  of 
M.A.  having  their  names  on  tlie  College  Books. 

4.  The  Examiners  are  the  Regius  Professor  of  Greek  and  the 
Professor  of  Latin. 

The  next  competition  will  be  in  November,  1922. 


THE  WILLIAM  ROBERTS  PRIZE. 

On  the  13th  December,  1884,  the  sum  of  £200  was  received 
from  Mrs.  William  Roberts,  to  found  a  Prize  in  Classics,  to  be 
called  the  "  William  Roberts  Prize."  This  Prize  is  awarded  to 
the  Student  who,  having  passed  the  Final  Freshman  Examina- 
tion, obtains  the  highest  marks  at  the  Classical  Honor  Examination 
of  the  Senior  Freshmen  in  the  Michaelmas  Term.  The  Fund 
yields  annually  about  £6. 


MULLINS  CLASSICAL  EXHIBITION. 

The  late  Inspector-General  Mullins  having  bequeathed  to  the 
College  a  sum  of  £600,  for  the  "foundation  of  an  Exhibition, 
to  be  called  the  Mullins  Classical  Exhibition,  in  such  Greek  and 
Latin  authors,  and  under  such  regulations  as  the  Provost  and 
Senior  Fellows  may  from  time  to  time  determine,"  the  Board 
adopted  the  following  Resolutions  in  the  year  1921  : — 

"  The  Exhibition  is  awarded  in  Michaelmas  Term  to  tlie  Junior 
Sophister  student  who  shall  have  obtiiined  the  highest  aggregate  of 
marks  in  the  nine  Classical  Honor  and  Prize  Examinations  of  the  three 


.174  SPECIAL   PHIZES 

Academic  years  immediately  preceding,  provided  that  those  students 
only  shall  be  taken  into  account  who  have  obtained  Honors  or  Prizes 
at  six  at  least  of  these  Examinations,  and  that  no  award  shall  be  made 
in  any  year  unless  in  the  opinion  of  the  Board  adequate  merit  has  been 
shown. 

"The  Exhibition  shall  be  tenable  for  one  year,  and  payable  in  two 
instalments  (December  and  June).  At  present  the  value  of  the 
Exhibition  is  about  £30." 


THE  MARSHALL  PORTEE  MEMORIAL  PRIZE. 

In  1900  a  Prize  was  founded  by  the  Rt.  Hon.  A.  M.  Porter  in 
memory  of  his  son,  Andrew  Marshall  Porter,  B.A.,  sometime 
Scholar,  who  died  of  wounds  received  in  action  at  Lindley, 
South  Africa. 

1.  The  Prize  is  awarded  each  year  to  the  candidate   for  Classical 
Scholarship  next  in  merit  to  the  last  Scholar  elected. 

2.  In  case  of  equality  of  marks,  preference  is  given  to  the  candidate 
who  shall  have  obtained  the  higher  marks  in  Classical  Composition. 

3.  In  case  of  insufficient  merit,  the  Prize  may  be  withheld  and  the 
interest  on  the  fund  added  to  capital. 

The  Prize  is  pajable  in  June,  and  its  annual  value  is  about  £20. 


PBIZES  IN    MENTAL   ANI)   MORAL   PHILOSOPHr.  175 


PRIZE  IN  MENTAL  AND  MORAL  PHILOSOPHY. 


THE  WBAY  PRIZE. 

A  SUM  of  £500  was  given  in  1848,  by  Mrs.  Catherine  Wray,  widow 
of  the  late  Kev.  Henry  Wray,  D.  D.,  Vice-Provost  and  Senior  Fel- 
low of  Trinity  College,  to  found  a  Prize  for  the  encoiu-agement 
of  Metaphysical  Studies  among  the  Undergraduates  of  the  Uni- 
versity of  Dublin. 

Students  in  the  Senior  Sophister  Class  are  alone  admissible  as 
Candidates.  The  Examination  is  held  in  Hilary  Term,  on  a  day 
arranged  at  the  end  of  the  preceding  Michaelmas  Term,  after  due 
notice  has  been  received.  The  Course  for  Examination  is  as 
follows : — 

1.  The  General  History  of  Philosophy. 

2.  The  following  works: — 

Descartes'  Meditatiotis. 

Spinoza's  Ethics,  Books  i  and  ii. 

Hume's  Enquiry  Concerning  Human  Unierstnnding. 

Kant's  Critique  of  the  Pure  Reason. 

Rogers'  Short  History  of  Ethics. 

3.  A  special  work  to  be  chosen  by  the  Honor  Examiners  and 
the  Professor  of  Moral  Philosophy,  and  submitted  to  the  Council 
not  later  than  May  25th  in  the  year  preceding  the  Examination. 

Special  work  for  1923  : — Macrun,  "  Hegel's  Doctrine  of  Formal 
Logic." 

The  value  of  the  Prize  is  about  £28. 


176  SPECIAL   PRIZKS. 

PRIZES   IN   EXPERIMENTAL   SCIENCE. 


EKENHEAD    SCHOLARSHIP. 

A  ScHOLAESHip,  called  "The  Ekenhead  Scholarship,"  tenable 
for  three  years,  was  founded  in  1879  by  Mrs.  Mary  Dummett,  in 
memory  of  her  brother,  Thomas  Ekenhead,  Esq. 

This  Scholarship,  which  is  open  only  to  natives  of  the  county 
of  Antrim,  will  be  awarded  to  the  best  answerer  (provided  that 
sufficient  merit  be  shown)  at  an  Examination  in  Elementary 
Physics  and  Chemistry,  to  be  held  in  the  Trinity  Term  of  every 
third  year.  Candidates  must  have  their  names  on  the  College 
Books,  and  must  not  have  passed  the  Examination  (Moderatorship 
or  General)  for  the  Degree  of  A.B.  An  Examination  will  be 
held  in  Trinity  Term,  1923,  the  appointed  subjects  of  Examination 
being  as  follows: — 

Elementaky  Coukse  in  Physics. 

Density  and  Seat. 

Comparison  of  weights  (balance). 

Measurement  of  pressure  (barometer,  manometer,  Marriott's  tube). 

Measurement  of  surface  tensions  of  liquids  (capillarity). 

Diffusion  of  liquids  and  gases  (dialysis,  viscosity). 

Measurement  of  densities  (specific  gravity  balance,  specific  gravity 
bottle,  hydrometers). 

Thermometry  (mercurial  thermometers,  Fahrenheit  and  Centigrade  scales) . 

Expansion  of  solids,  liquids,  and  gases  (Roy  and  Ramsden's,  Dulongand 
Petit's,  and  Regnault's  experiments,  compensating  pendulums,  maxi- 
mum density  of  water,  air  thermometers). 

Measurement  of  densities  of  gases  and  vapours  (Regnault's  and  Guy 
Lussac's  methods). 

Measurement  of  specific  heats  (method  of  mixtures,  Dulong  and  Petit's 
law). 

Changes  of  state  (liquefaction,  evaporation,  and  boiling). 

Measiuement  of  tension  of  saturated  vapours  (Regnault's  experiments). 

Measurement  of  latent  heat  (ice  calorimeters,  CaiTe's  freezing  machine). 

Measurement  of  heat  of  combustion. 

Determination  of  mechanical  equivalent  of  heat  (Joule's  experiments). 

Work  done  by  a  body  expanding  (indicator  diagram,  steam-engine). 

£lectriciti/. 

Production  of  electric  currents  by  chemical  action  (WoUaston's,  Daaiell's 

and  Grove's  cells). 
Measurement  of  intensity  of  current  (tangent  galvanometer). 
Laws  of  electrolysis  (Faraday's  experiments,  voltameters,  electrotyping). 

Opiici. 
Laws  of  Reflexion  and  Refraction,  experimentally  considered  ;  Piisms ; 
Spectroscope ;  Lenses. 


PRIZES  IN  EXPERIMENTAL  SCIENCE.  lit 


Chemistry. 

Candidates  are  expected  to  give  evidence  of  experimental  knowledge  in 
the  following  subjects : — 

Modes  of  distinguishing  physical  and  chemical  change ;  Proofs  of  laws 
of  constant  composition ;  Definite  and  multiple  proportions ;  Deter- 
mination of  equivalent  and  atomic  weights ;  Distinctions  of  metals 
and  non-melals ;  Characters  and  modes  of  preparation  of  chief  non- 
*  metals,  and  of  their  acid  and  non-acid  products  ;  Composition  of  air, 
water,  and  coal-gas  ;  The  processes  of  combustion  and  of  respiration 
in  animals  and  plants ;  Detection  of  common  acids  and  metals ; 
Preparation  and  properties  of  the  metals  and  their  chief  compounds; 
Spectra  of  the  principal  metals. 

Candidates  are  also  expected  to  perform  simple  chemical  calculations. 

The  Ekenhead  Scholarship  is  tenable  for  three  years.  The  Fund 
produces  annually  about  £32,  and  is  payable  half-yearly  in 
February  and  October. 


FITZGERALD  MEMORIAL  SCHOLARSHIP  AND  MEDAL. 

In  1902  a  Scholarship,  to  be  called  the  "  FitzGerald  Memorial 
Scholarship,"  was  founded  by  his  friends  in  memory  of  George 
Francis  FitzGerald,  F.R.S.,  Fellow,  and  Erasmus  Smith's 
Professor  of  Natural  and  Experimental  Philosophy. 

1.  The  Scholarship  (in  value 'about  £60)  is  awarded  annually  to  a 
Graduate,  being  a  Moderator  in  Experimental  Science,  who  has 
answered  well  in  Physics  and  who  has  shown  merit  in  his  experimental 
work  in  the  Physical  Laboratory. 

2.  The  FitzGerald  Scholar  is  required  during  his  tenure  to  carry  out 
research  in  the  Physical  Laboratory,  and  take  part  in  the  practical 
instruction  of  students  therein,  under  the  direction  of  Erasmus  Smith's 
Professor  of  Natural  and  Experimental  Philosophy. 

3.  A  Scholar  may  be  re-elected  for  a  second  year,  in  special  circum- 
stances, on  the  recommendation  of  the  said  Professor. 

4.  Out  of  the  same  fund,  a  FitzGerald  Memorial  Medal  is  awarded, 
when  merit  is  shown,  lo  students  carrying  out  research  in  the  Physical 
Laboratory,  on  the  recommendation  of  the  said  Professor. 


I3 


178  SPECIAL  PRIZES. 


PRIZES  IN  HISTORY  AND  POLITICAL  SCIENCE. 


CLUFF  MEMORIAL  PRIZE. 

In  1870  a  Prize  was  founded  by  subscription  in  memory  of  James 
Stanton  ClufF,  ex-Scholar. 

It  is  now  awarded  to  the  best  answerer  at  the  Examination  for 
Prizes  in  Modern  History,  held  in  the  Michaelmas  Term  of  the 
Junior  Sophister  year. 

The  value  of  the  Prize  is  about  £12. 


THE  BLAKE  NATIONAL  HISTORY  SCHOLARSHIP. 

In  1884  a  Scholarship,  to  be  called  "  The  Blake  National  History 
Scholarship,"  was  founded  by  a  bequest  of  Miss  Helen  Blake. 

1.  An  election  is  held  every  fourth  year,  and  the  Scholar  is  elected 
for  four  years,  the  annual  value  of  the  Scholarship  being  about  £92. 

2.  The  Scholarship  is  awarded  to  the  author  of  the  best  unpublished 
Essay  on  a  prescribed  subject  connected  with  the  History  of  Ireland 
which  has  been  announced  three  years  before  the  election. 

3.  The  Competition  is  open  to  all  members  of  Trinity  College  under 
M.A.  standing. 

4.  Scholars  may  retain  their  Scholarships  after  taking  the  M.A. 
Degree  ;  but  they  must  reside  in  the  College,  or  in  its  vicinity,  under 
penalty  of  forfeiture. 

5.  If  insufficient  merit  is  shown,  or  if  a  Scholarship  is  forfeited  or 
becomes  vacant,  the  available  interest  is  invested  to  form  a  separate 
fund  from  which  a  reward  may  be  given  to  unsuccessful  candidates^  or 
the  expenses  of  publication  of  a  specially  meritorious  essay  may  be 
defrayed. 

6.  The  subject  for  1924  is: — The  Dissolution  of  the  Irish  Monas- 
teries under  Henry  VIII.  Candidates  should  trace  briefly  the  history 
of  the  separate  monasteries  existing  at  that  time,  and  add  any  points  of 
interest  bearing  on  the  after-history  of  the  dissolved  houses  up  to  1603, 
but  the  major  portion  of  their  work  should  be  devoted  to  the  possessions 
of  the  monastic  houses  and  the  circumstances  of  their  dissolution.  The 
attention  of  Candidates  is  particularly  drawn  to  the  mass  of  contem- 
porary State  Inquisitions  into  monastic  property  which  are  deposited 
in  the  Public  Record  Office,  Dublin,  and  which  should  form  the  basis 
of  their  inquiries.  Candidates  are  requested  to  observe  that  it  is  not 
a  mere  dissertation  on  a  period  that  is  required,  but  a  narrative  of 
facts.  This  narrative  must  be  derived  throughout  from  original 
sources,  and  every  portion  of  it  must  be  supported  by  reference  to 
printed  or  manuscript  documents.  Candidates  are  invited  to  discuss 
the  value  of  the  authorities  they  use. 

Essays  are  to  be  sent  to  the  Registrar  on  or  before  Ist  November, 
1924. 


^atZES  IN   HISTOkt    AND  POLITICAL   SCIENCE.  1T9 


DUNBAR  INGRAM  MEMORIAL  PRIZE. 

On  December  2,  1896,  J.  K.  Ingram,  LL.D.,  Senior  Fellow  oi 
Trinity  College,  gave  a  sum  of  £250  for  the  foundation  of  a  Prize 
in  Modern  History,  in  memory  of  his  son,  T.  Dunbar  Ingram,  and 
it  was  resolved — 

"  That  a  Prize  be  founded  to  be  called  the  Dunbar  Ingram  Memorial 
Prize :  that  it  be  annually  awarded  to  the  student  who,  having  passed 
the  Final  Freshman  Examination,  shall  obtain  the  highest  sum 
of  marks  at  the  Honor  Examination  in  Modern  History  held  in  the 
Michaelmas  Term  of  the  Senior  Freshman  year  :  that  Candidates  at 
that  examination,  who  desire  to  compete  for  this  Prize,  shall  be  allowed 
to  increase  their  sum  of  marks  by  answering  in  a  special  course  on  some 
historical  period,  changeable  from  time  to  time." 

The  sum  invested  produces  annually  about  £8. 

The  Special  Course  at  present  is  : — 

IRELAND    UNDER   THE    NOUMANS,    1169-1216. 

Expugnatio  Hibemica  of  Giraldus  Cambrensis  (Rolls  Series). 
Orpen  :  Ireland  under  the  Normans,  vols,  i  and  ii. 


PRIZE  IN  POLITICAL  ECONOMY. 

The  Examination  for  this  Prize  will  be  held  each  year  in  Trinity 
Term,  and  will  be  open  to  all  students  under  the  stanaing  of 
M.A. 

No  Candidate  who  has  obtained  the  Prize  will  be  permitted 
to  compete  at  a  subsequent  Examination. 

The  value  of  the  Prize  is  £15. 

In  ease  of  nearly  equal  merit  the  amount  of  the  Prize  may 
be  divided  between  the  Candidates  in  the  proportion  recommenGed 
by  the  Professor. 
'  The  Course  consists  of  two  parts,  viz. : — 

I.  General  Course  (60  marks). 

Candidates  will  be  examined  in — 

(i)  Economic  Theory  and  History  of  Theories. 
(ii)  Economic  History, 
(ill)  The  Elements  of  Statistics. 

II.  Special  Course  (40  marks). 


ISO  SPfiCIAt  tlltZES. 

SpeciallSubject  for  1923, 

"  Markets,  their  Organization  and  Functions." 

The  following  works  may  be  used  for  the  study  of  this 
subject : — 

J.  G.  Smith,  "  Organized  Produce  Markets." 

F.  Lavington,  "  The  English  Capital  Market." 

H.  C.  Emery,"  Speculation  on  the  Stock  and  Produce  Markets  of 
the  United  States." 


WHATELY  MEMORIAL  PBIZE  IN  POLITICAL  ECONOMY. 

In  1871  the  Archbishop  Wliately  Memorial  Committee  handed 
to  tlie  College  a  sum  of  money,  the  interest  on  which  amounts  to 
about  £12  annually,  to  provide  a  Prize  in  Political  Economy. 

The  Prize  is  now  awarded  every  fi-v  e  years  to  the  author  of  the  best 
essay  on  a  specified  economic  subject.  Graduates  of  any  chartered 
University  in  Great  Britain  and  Ireland  are  eligible  as  candidates. 
Essays,  with  fictitious  signatures  attached,  must  be  sent  to  the  Senior 
Lecturer  before  October  Ist.  The  subject  is  announced  at  least  a  year 
in  advance. 

The  next  competition  will  be  in  1927. 


PRIZES  IN  ANCIENT  HISTORY  AND  CLASSICAL 
ARCHEOLOGY. 

Bdok  prizes  to  the  amount  of  £5  in  all  are  distributed  each 
Michaelmas  Term  among  the  students  obtaining  the  highest 
totals  of  marks  at  the  three  Class  Examinations  held  in  January, 
April,  and  October  respectively  ou  the  work  of  the  previous  Terms 
in  Ancient  History  and  Classical  Archaeology. 


PEIZES   IN   ENGLISH.  181 


PHIZES  IN  ENGLISH. 


VICE-CHANCELLOR'S  PRIZES  IN  ENGLISH. 

The  rules  with  respect  to  the  Vice-Chancellor's  Prizes  in  English 
Prose  and  English  Verse  have  been  given  already  under  "Vice- 
Chancellor's  Prizes." 

Subjects  for  the  Prizes  to  he  awarded  in  January,  1928. 

English  Prose — "Principles  and   Practices  of  the  Classicists  in 

English  Literature." 
English  Verse — "Armenia." 


PRIZE  IN  OLD  AND  MIDDLE  ENGLISH. 

In  Trinity  Terra,  1906,  the  Board  established  an  annual  Prize 
of  £10  10s.  to  encourage  the  study  of  Old  and  Middle  English. 
The  following  Course  has  been  approved  : — 

Sweet :  Anglo-Saxon  Reader  (last  edition). 
Beowulf:  (ed.  Wyatt,  Cambridge  University  Press). 
Morris  and  Skeat :  Specimens  of  Early  English,  Part  i. 

Introduction  and  extracts,  6,  9,  13.  19,  20  ;  Part  ii. 

Introduction  and  extracts,  9,  10,  16. 
Sievers  :  Grammar  of  Old  English,  ed.  Cook. 
Wyld  :  Historical  Study  of  the  Mother  Tongue.     London  :  John 

Murray,  1906. 
Camhridge  History  of  English  Literature,  vol.  i. 
(Jnseen  passages  for  translation  may  be  set  at  the  discretion  of  the 
examiners. 


DOCTOR  HENRY  HUTCHINSON  STEWART  LITERARY 
AND  MEDICAL  SCHOLARSHIPS. 

In  1884  a  bequest  of  Henry  Hutchinson  Stewart  was  received  to 
found  Scholarships  in  Literature  and  in  Medicine,  to  be  called 
"  The  Doctor  Henry  Hutchinson  Stewart  Scholarships." 

A  Literary  Scholarship  of  £25  a  year  for  three  years  is 
awarded  annually  (if  merit  be  shown),  in  Michaelmas  Term,  to 
the  Junior  Sophister  who  shall  have  obtained  the  highest  aggre- 
gate of  marks  at  the  three  Honor  Examinations  in  Modern 
Literature  of  the  Junior  Sophister  year,   and  the   two   Prize 


182  stEciAL  puiijtes. 

Examinations  held  in  the  Michaelmas  Terms  of  the  Freshman 
years  in  English,  French,  German,  Italian,  or  Spanish  Literature. 
Jf  a  candidate  has  obtained  Prizes  in  more  than  one  of  these 
subjects  in  his  Freshman  years,  that  subject  in  which  he  obtained 
the  highest  marks  will  alone  be  taken  into  account. 

For  the  Dr.  Henry  Hutchinson  Stewart  Medical  Scholarships, 
see  under  the  head  "  School  of  Physic,  Prizes." 


RICHARD  F.  LITTLEDALE  PRIZE. 

On  January  18,  1892,  Mr.  Harold  Littledale  and  other  relatives 
and  friends  of  the  late  Kev.  Richard  F.  Littledale,  D.D.,  con- 
tributed a  sura  of  £228  14s.  6d.  for  the  founding  of  a  Prize  in 
English  Literature  in  commemoration  of  him,  and  it  was  decided 
that  the  Prize  should  be  awarded  annually  to  the  student  who, 
having  passed  the  Final  Freshman  Examination,  shall  obtain  the 
highest  marks  at  the  Michaelmas  Senior  Freshman  Prize  Exami- 
nation in  English  Literature. 

The  sum  invested  produces  annually  about  £8. 


PRIZES  IN  ORIENTAL  LANGUAGES. 


HEBREW,    CHALDEE,    AND    SYRIAC    PRIZES. 

A  8DM  not  exceeding  £40  is  given  annually  for  Prizes  in  Hebrew, 
Chaldee,  and  Syriac.  For  the  conditions  under  which  these 
Prizes  (open  to  all  Students)  are  given,  see  "  Divinity  School," 
§v.  1. 


PRIZES  IN  ARABIC,  PERSIAN,  HINDUSTANI,  AND 
SANSKRIT. 

Annual  Prizes  of  £10  each  for  proficiency  in  Arabic  and  Sanskrit, 
and  of  £5  each  for  proficiency  in  Persian  and  Hindustani,  are 
awarded  (if  merit  is  shown)  on  the  result  of  Examinations  held 
in  Trinity  Term,  open  to  Students  who  have  studied  under  the 
respective  Professors  for  at  least  three  Terms. 


PEIZES   IN   LANGtTAGKS.  l83 

PRIZES  IN  LANGUAGES. 


PRIZES  IN  IRISH. 

Phizes  to  the  amount  of  £20  are  given  annually  for  proficiency 
in  the  Irish  Language,  on  the  result  of  an  examination  held  in 
Trinity  Term,  on  a  day  to  be  fixed  before  the  end  of  the  preced- 
ing Hilary  Term. 

The  following  Courses  have  been  appointed  : — 

Junior  Class — 

1 .  Elements  of  Irish  Grammar. 

2.  Irish  Composition. 

3.  Irish  Texts,  for  translation  into  English  :  P^'jO'Leary,  Seadna, 

pp.  1  to  53. 

Middle  Class — 

1.  Irish  Grammar. 
Irish  Composition. 

Irish  Text,  for  translation  into  English : 
Brttidhean  Chaorthainit,  ed.  Pearse. 
Eachlra  Tkaidg  mhic  Ceiu,  by  An  Seabliac. 
Senior  Class — 

1.  A  thorough  knowledge  of  Irish  Grammar. 

2.  Irish  Composition. 

3.  Irish  Texts,  for  translation  into  English  : — 

Oidhe  Cloiiine  Uisnigh. 

Sgealaigheaeht  Cheitmn  (Bergin). 

Geoffrey  Keating's  Poems,  ed.  M'Erlean,  i  to  xi,  inciusiTe. 


FERGUSON  MEMORIAL  PRIZE. 

In  1907  a  Prize,  now  of  the  value  of  £'lo,  was  founded  by 
subscription  in  memory  of  Sir  Samuel  Ferguson,  LL.1>.,  and 
Lady  Ferguson,  to  be  called  the  "  Ferguson  Memorial  Prize." 

1.  The  Prize  is  awarded  (if  sufficient  merit  is  shown)  for  the 
best  edition  of  a  text  in  Old  or  Middle  Irish,  hitherto  unpublished, 
and  relating  to  any  part  of  the  history  or  literature  of  Ireland 
prior  to  the  year  1200  a.d.  The  edition  shall  include  a  transla- 
tion, textual  criticism,  explanatory  commentary,  and  a,glT)ssary, 
and  shall  be  completely  prepared  as  for  publication. 

2.  It  is  open  to  all  Undergraduates  and  Graduates  under  the 
standing  of  M. A.  It  is  offered  lor  competition  every  <Ain/ year, 
and  if  it  is  not  awarded  the  interest  is  added  to  the  capital  of  the 
fund. 

Exercises  for  the  competition  of  1923  must  be  sent  to  the  Senior 
Lecturer  before  March  17. 


184  SPECIAL  PRIZES* 


PRIZES  IN  OLD  FRENCH  AND  PROVENCAL. 

PiazES  to  the  total  amount  of  £5  are  awarded  on  the  result  of  an 
examination  in  Old  French  and  Proven9al,  held  in  Trinity  Term, 
and  open  to  all  Students  on  the  books  under  the  standing  of 
Middle  Bachelor. 

The  following  Course  has  been  appointed  :  — 

I.  Extraits  de  la  Chanson  de  Roland  (Hachette). 
Aucassiii  at  Nicolette  (Manchester). 
Le  Mystere  d'Adam  (Manchester). 
Gautier  d'Aupais  (Champion). 

II.  {a)  Mistral :  Mireio,  Cantos  i  to  iv,  inclusive. 

Memorie  Raconte,  chapters  x  to  end. 
Aubanel  :  Lou  Pan  dou  Peuat. 
Estieu :  Lo  Romancero  occitan. 
Perbosc  :   Guilhem  de  Toloza. 

A.  Roviri  i  Virgili :  Lletres  Catalanes,  parts  i  and  ii. 
Folguera :  Las  noves  Valors  de  la  Poesia  catalana. 
(b)  Peire  Vidal  :  Poesies  (Champion). 

Bertran  de  Marseille  :  Vie  de  Sainte  Enemie  (Champion). 
A.  Roviri  i  Virgili :  as  above,  part  iii. 

III.  The  elements  of  the  comparative  philology  of  French  and 
Provencal  (including  Catalan)  and  of  the  dialects  of  Old 
French  and  of  ProvenQal,  old  and  modern,  f  For  particulars, 
apply  to  the  Professor.] 


THE  DOMPIKRRE-CHAUFEPIK  PRIZE. 

In  1912  Mr.  G.  A.  Exham,  Fellow,  founded  a  Prize  in  French 
in  memory  of  Eugenie  de  Dompierre  de  Chaufepie,  of  the  Hague, 
to  be  called  "The  Dompierre-Chaufepie  Prize." 

(1)  Tile  Prize  is  given  in  Trinity  Term  in  connexion  with  the  Senior 
Freshman  Honor  Examination  in  French,  only  the  Essay  and  a  special 
viva  voce  examination  (to  test  the  candidates'  practical  knowledge  of 
French)  to  be  taken  into  account. 

(2)  Candidates  must  have  attended  (any)  three  Terms  of  Honor 
Lectures  in  French  previous  to  the  examination,  and  must  be  recom- 
mended by  the  Honor  Lecturer. 

(3)  The  value  of  the  Prize  is  about  £8. 


MISCELLANEOUS  FKIZES.  86 


MISCELLANEOUS  PRIZES. 


ALICE  OLLHAM  MEMORIAL  PRIZE. 

In  1908  a  Prize  was  founded  by  her  friends  in  memory  of  Alice 
Oldham. 

It  is  awarded  bienninlly  m  Michatlmas  Term  by  a  Committee 
consisting  of  tlie  Senior  Lecturer,  the  Senior  Dean,  nnd  the  Lady 
Registrar,  to  the  Student  whom  they  shall  adjudge  to  be  the 
most  distinguished  of  the  Women  Students  completing  their 
Junior  Sophister  year.  The  prize-winner  must  have  attended 
classes  at  Alexandra  College  for  at  least  one  session. 

The  value  of  the  Prize  is  £10;  and  any  interest  on  the  fund 
in  excess  ot  £10  is  to  be  added  to  capital,  so  that  ultimately  the 
Prize  may  be  awarded  annually. 

The  next  award  will  be  made  in  November,  1922. 


THE  MINCHIN  PRIZE. 

In  Trinity  Term,   1921,   Mrs.  Minchin   presented  £200  to  the 
Board  to  found  a  Prize  in  memory  of  her  late  Inisbaud,  George 
Miiichiii  Minchin,  M.A  ,  F.R.fS  ,  and  expressed  her  wishes  as  to 
the  manner  in  wliich  the  Prize  should  be  awarded. 
The  Board  made  the  following  arrangements  : — 

The  Minchin  Prizeman  shall  be  nominated  to  the  Board  by  a 
Committee  consisting  of  the  Senior  Lecturer,  the  Senior  Dean,  the 
Junior  Dean,  Erasmus  Smith's  Professor  of  Mathematics,  and  Erasmus 
Smith's  Professor  of  Natiiriil  and  Experimental  Philosoiihy,  in  June, 
from  among  the  outgoing  Senior  Freshmiin  Class,  regard  being  had  to 
character  and  general  academic  attainments,  as  well  as  to  scientific 
proficiency. 


C     186     ) 


€^btbitt0nji'  aitb  S]^ecial  Irises  atoarhft  at 
t^utraita. 


JUNIOR  AND  SENIOR  EXHIBITIONS. 

In  Trinity  Terra,  1870,  it  was  resolved  by  the  Board  tliat,  in 
pursuance  of  the  Decree  of  the  Board  and  Visitors,  dated  March  19, 
1870,  certain  Exhibitions  should  be  established  in  the  College, 
subject  to  such  changes  as  the  Provost  and  Senior  Fellows  might 
from  time  to  time  ordain.  The  number  of  these  Exhibitions  was 
increased  in  Trinity  Term,  1875,  and  in  Michaelmas  Term,  1904. 

On  March  8,  1913,  the  Board  discontinued  the  twelve  Exhi- 
bitions hitherto  awarded  on  the  results  of  the  Intermediate 
Kxamination,  and  on  June  7,  1913,  resolved,  that  Exhibitions 
shall  in  future  be  distributed  by  the  Board  at  their  discretion 
when  the  results  of  the  Senior  and  Junior  Exhibition  Examinations 
are  laid  before  them. 

I. JUNIOR  EXHIKrriONS. 

1 .  Twelve  Junior  Exhibitions  of  £20,  and  four  of  £15  a  year,  tenable 
for  two  years,  are  awarded  annually  on  the  results  of  an  Examination 
lield  in  Michaelmas  Term,  provided  sufficient  merit  is  shown. 

2.  No  Candidate  is  admitted  who  has  completed  his  nineteenth  year 
before  the  1st  of  June  immediately  preceding  the  Examination  ;  and 
all  Candidates  must  furnish  to  the  Senior  Lecturer  their  names,  with  a 
baptismal  certificate  or  other  satisfactory  evidence  of  age,  at  least  three 
days  before  the  Examination. 

3.  The  competition  is  open  (a)  to  Students  in  the  rising  Junior 
Freshman  Class  who  have  entered  within  the  year,  and  (i)  to  Candidates 
not  on  the  College  Books  who  furnish  satisfactory  evidence  of  character, 
and  who  pay  a  special  fee  of  £1  seven  days  before  the  Examination. 

4.  The  latter  class  of  Candidates  will  not  be  elected  to  Exhibitions 
unless  the  Senior  Lecturer  is  satisfied  that  they  have  qualified  in  eacli 
of  the  subjects  required  for  Entrance.  Such  Candidates  are  permitted 
to  place  their  names  on  tlie  College  Books  by  payment  of  the  excess  of 
the  Entrance  Fee  over  tlie  Special  Fee  of  J61,  within  one  week  of  the 
election  of  Exhibitioners,  after  which  the  usual  charge  for  tardy  pay- 
ment begins.  If  a  Candidate  is  elected  to  an  Exhibition,  the  December 
payment  may  be  credited  to  him,  at  his  Tutor's  lequest,  as  part  of  his 
Entrance  Fee. 


JDNIOR  EXniBITlONS. 


187 


5.  No  Student  holding  u  Supplemented  Krasniiis  Smith  Exhibition 
is  entitled  to  hold  a  Junior  Exhibition  ;  and  a  Student  who  loses  his 
class  or  does  not  keep  }iis  name  on  the  College  Books  forfeits  his 
Exhibition. 

6.  If  an  Exhibitioner  does  not  make  satisfactory  progress  in  his 
Junior  Freshman  year,  or  if  he  is  guilty  of  any  grave  violation  of 
College  discipline,  his  Exhibition  may  be  forfeited. 

7.  The  Exhibitions  are  paid  half-yearly,  in  December  and  June, 
through  the  Tutors. 

8.  The  Examination  lasts  four  days  (five  if  Experimental  Science  is 
taken),  beginnins;  at  9.30  o'clock,  a.m.,  and  is  in  the  following 
Courses:  — 


Cliissics  (400  marks). 

Latin  Compo-sition  and  Unprescribed  I'assages, 
Greek  Composition  and  Unprescribed  Passages, 
Viva  voce  [\ja.i\n),           .... 
Viva  voce  (Greek), 

Ancient  History  (60  marks). 

Knglish  (180  marks). 

An  English  Essay, 

English  Literature,        ..... 

Or, 
English  History  and  Modern  Geography, 


Marks. 

170 
170 

30 

30 


100 
80 


French  or  German  (180  marks). 
Science  (340  iparks). 


Arithmetic,    ...... 

Algebra,        ...... 

Geometry,     ...... 

Viva  voce  on  the  propositions  of  Euclid, 
JMane  Trigonometry,     .         .         .         . 


60 
90 
60 
40 
90 


Experimental  Science  (150  marks). 

Each  candidate  shall  bring  up  one"  Greek,  and  one"  Latin  book  of 
his  own  selection  for  viva  voce  Examination.  He  must  send  the  Senior 
Lecturer  notice  of  his  selection  at  least  one  week  before  the  Examination. 


*  .\s  regards  tlie  definition  of  one  book,  tlie  Senior  Lecturer  will  accept  an  amount  of 
any  classical  author  equivalent,  in  Greeli,  to  one  book  of  Tliucydides.  or  two  books  of 
Xenopiion.  or  a  Greek  pliiy,  or  tln'ue  books  of  Homer:  and.  in  Latin,  to  a  book  of  Livy 
or  two  books  o(  Caesar,  or  a  speecti  of  Cicero's  not  sliorter  tlian  tlie  pro  J/iiotie,  or  two 
books  of  Virgil. 


188  JUNIOR  EXHIBITIONS. 

The  Course  in  Algebra  and  Trigonometry  is :  — 

Algebra,    Up   to,   and  including,    Surds,   Quadratic  Equations,  and 
questions  involving  two  unknown  quantities. 

Trigonometry,  To  the  end  of  Solution  of  Plane  Triangles. 

The  Course  in  English  consists  of: — 

1.  Trench,  English  Past  and  Present. 

2.  A.   Haniilton-Tliompson's  History   of  Englisli    Literature 

(Murray),  Chaps,  vi.,  vii.,  viii'.,  §  1  and  §  2,  xi.,  xii., 
XV.,  XVII.,  XIX..  omitting  Notes  and  Illustrations,  with 
corresponding  portions  of  Smith's  Specimens  of  English 
Literature  (from  "  Short  Specimens,"  also  published 
as  "Smaller  Specimens"). 

3.  Milton,  Paradise  Lost,  Book  I. 

4.  Shakspere,  Merchant  of  A''enice. 

5.  English  Composition. 

6.  History  of  England  (Green's  Short  History  of  the  English 

People). 

7.  Outlines  of  general  Geography,  M'ith  a  detailed  knowledge 

of  the  British  Empiie  :  Phys-ii^al  Geography  ;  J.  W. 
Gregory,  "Geography,  Structural,  Physical  and  Compa- 
rative," parts  1,  2,  3. 

The  Course  in  Experimental  Science  is : — 

Physics. — Measurement  of  length,  area,  volume,  density,  weight, 
pressure,  and  time. 

Elementary  phenomena  of  Heat,  Light,  and  Sound.  (One  hour  and 
a  half.) 

CAemts<?y.— Physical  and  Chemical  change.  First  laws  of  Chemistry. 
Elements  and  compounds.  Mechanical  mixtures  and  Chemical  com- 
pounds. The  properties  of  the  typical  elements.  Hydrogen,  Oxygen, 
Nitrogen,  and  Carbon.  The  Elementary  Chemistry  of  the  atmosphere. 
(One  hour  and  a  half.) 

[These  Papers  may  either  be  set  during  the  Vivd  Voce  days,  or  on  a 
subsequent  morning.] 

The  Certificate  of  a  year's  work  in  an  approved  Laboratory  will  be 
required. 


8KH10R   EXHIBITIONS.  '  189 

II.  —  SENIOR    EXHIllITIONS    AWARDED    AT    THE    CLOSE    OF    THE    SECOND 
YEAU. 

1.  Twelve  Senior  Exhibitions  of  £20,  and  four  of  £15  a  year, 
tenable  for  two  years,  are  awarded  annually  in  Michaelmas  Term  to 
Students  who  have  passed  the  Final  Freshman  Examination,  provided 
sufficient  mtMit  is  shown. 

2.  All  Senior  Freshmen  intending  to  compete  must  forward  their 
names  to  the  Senior  Lecturer  at  least  seven  days  before  the  beginning 
of  the  Final  Freshman  Examination.  Those  who  are  late  in  sending 
this  notice  must  pay  a  fee  of  £1  before  their  names  can  be  placed  on 
the  list  of  candidates. 

3.  No  Student  who  is  a  Scholar  of  the  House  (Foundation  or  non- 
Foundation),  or  who  holds  a  Supplemented  Erasmus  Smith  Exhibition 
or  a  Kidd  Scliolarsbip,  or  who  has  dropped  a  class  since  his  entrance,  is 
entitled  to  compete  (or  a  Senior  Exhibition  ;  and  a  Student  who  loses 
his  class  or  does  not  keep  his  name  on  the  C'Uege  Books  forfeits  his 
Exhibition. 

4.  Any  grave  violation  of  College  discipline  subjects  the  holder  of  a 
Senior  Exhibition  to  forfeiture. 

5.  The  Exhibitions  are  paid  half-yealy,  in  December  and  June, 
through  the  Tutors. 

6.  After  the  close  of  the  Prize  Examinations  in  Michaelmas  Term,  the 
Senior  Lecturer  adds  to  the  total  of  the  marks  obtained  by  any 
Candidate  for  Senior  Exhibitions  at  the  Final  Freshman  Examination — 

Fifty  per  cent,  of  the  sum  of  the  marks  above  a  certain  minimum 
(which  is  fixed  for  each  subjeit)  obtained  nt  the  Prize  Examina- 
tions in  Michaelmas  Term,  and  the  Honor  Examinations  (if  any) 
in  either  Hilary  or  Trinity  Term,  by  each  student  in  Mathematics, 
Classics,  Mental  and  Moral  Philosophy,  Experimental  Science, 
Natural  Science,  History,  and  Old  and  Middle  Iiish  ;  and  thirty- 
five  per  cent,  of  the  sum  of  the  marks  above  this  minimum  in 
each  case  obtained  at  tlie  Prize  Examinations  in  Michaelmas 
Term,  and  the  Honor  Examinations  in  either  Hilaiy  or  Trinity 
Term,  by  the  student  in  English  Literature,  French,  German, 
Italian,  and  Spanish. 

The  minima  are  fixed  as  follows: — Mathematics,  15  per  cent.  ; 
Chissics,  25  per  cent. ;  Logic,  40  per  cent. ;  History,  40  per  cent. ; 
Experimental  Science,  30  per  cent ;  Natural  Science,  35  per 
cent.  ;  Celtic  Languages,  40  percent.  ;  Knglish  Literature,  40  per 
cent.  ;  French,  40  per  cent.  ;  German,  40  per  cent.  ;  Italian, 
40  per  cent. ;  Spanish,  40  per  cent. 

In  the  case  of  a  Student  obtaining  Honors  in  the  same  department  at 
both  the  Hilary  and  Trinity  Examinations,  the  highest  marks  are 
taken  into  account. 

7.  The  list  of  marks  thus  made  up  is  submitted  to  the  Board  by  the 
Senior  Lecturer,  with  the  names  arranged  in  order  of  merit ;  and  the 
Board  elects  the  sixteen  most  deserving  Candidates  as  Senior  Exhibi- 
tioners, provided  sufficient  merit  has  been  shown. 


190  *  EUASMUS  SMITH  EXHIBITIONS. 


ERASMUS  SMITH  EXHIBITIONS. 

Of  the  Erasmus  Smith  Exhibitions  which  are  tenable  at  Trinity 
College,  there  are  two  classes,  Statutory  Exhibitions  and  Supple- 
mented Exhibitions.  For  the  Statutory  Exhibitions,  which  are 
awarded  witliout  examination,  see  p.  192. 

1.  One  Supplemented  Exhibilion  of  £40  annually,  and  one  of  £25 
annually,  each  tenable  for  five  years,  are  awarded  to  the  best  answerers 
at  the  Junior  Exhibition  Examination  (see  p.  186)  who  have  been 
pupils  for  three  years  at  any  of  the  Erasmus  Smitli  Grammar  Schools 
at  Drogbcda,  Galway,  and  Tipperary  ;  and  one  Supjilemented  Exhibi- 
tion of  £25,  tenable  for  four  years,  is  in  like  manner  awarded  to  the 
best  answerer  at  the  Junior  Exhibition  Examination  who  has  been  a 
pupil  for  three  years  at  the  High  School,  Dublin. 

2.  Candidates  must  be  under  20  years  of  age  on  the  first  day  of  the 
Junior  Exliibition  Examination  ;  and  must  liave  remained  as  pupils  at 
the  school  from  Avhich  they  compete  until  the  October  Entrance  (if 
Pensioners)  or  until  the  Sizarship  Examination  (if  Sizars). 

3.  Candidates  must  furnish  their  names  to  the  Senior  Lecturer 
before  the  end  of  the  first  week  in  October. 

4.  A  candidate  who  obtains  first  place  at  the  Junior  Exhibition 
Examination  has  his  Supplemented  Exhibition  increased  by  £10 
annually. 

5.  No  Supplemented  Exhibition  is  granted  unless  merit  is  shown  ; 
and  no  Exhibition  of  tlie  amount  of  £40  unless  the  candidate  is  among 
the  first  fourteen  at  the  Junior  Exhibition  Examination  or  has  scored 
at  least  45  per  cent,  on  the  average. 

6.  The  holder  of  a  Supplemented  Exhibiton  must  keep  his  name  on 
the  College  Books,  proceed  regularly  with  his  class,  and  obtain  in  each 
academic  year  one  honor  of  the  first  rank  or  tM'O  of  the  second  rank. 
The  gaining  of  his  Exhibition  is  reckoned  as  equivalent  to  a  second 
honor  in  his  Junior  Freshman  year,  and  of  a  Moderatorship  to  a  first 
honor  in  his  Senior  Sophister  year.  The  gaining  of  a  Scholarsliip 
counts  as  a  first  honor  in  any  year.  A  student  on  the  books  of  any 
Professional  School  is  regarded,  for  the  purposes  of  his  Exhibition,  as 
on  the  College  books;  and  a  "Pass  with  Credit,"  certified  by  the 
Registrar  of  the  School,  entitles  him  to  retain  his  Exhibition.* 

7.  Erasmus  Smith  Exhibitioners  are  preferentially  given,  without 
payment  of  rent,  rooms  of  the  kind  allocated  to  poor  students,  when 
such  are  vacant ;  and  if  they  aie  given  rooms  of  a  better  class  they  are 
charged  only  £5  annually  as  rent.  The  term  "  rent"  does  not  include 
charges  for' furniture  and  lighting,  or  "improvement"  charges.  An 
Exhibitioner  who  is  also  a  Scholar  of  the  house  cannot  claim  reduction 
in  rent  both  as  an  Erasmus  Smith  Exhibitioner  and  a.s  a  Scholar. 

For  further  details  as  to  the  tenure  of  these  Exliibitions,  and 
the  mode  of  payment,  application  should  be  made  to  the  Registrar 

■"——"—  J 


PRIZES  AT  KNTBANCE.  191 

THE  JAMES  PATRICK  KIDD  SCHOLARSHIP. 

In  18S7  a  sum  of  £2,000  was  bequeathed  by  Mary  Lang  Kidd 
to  found  a  Scholarship  to  be  called  "The  James  Patrick  Kidd 
Scholiirship." 

1.  The  animal  value  of  the  Scholarship  is  about  £80,  and  is  tenable 
for  four  years. 

2.  When  the  Scholarship  is  vacant  it  is  awarded  to  the  first  in 
merit  of  the  candidates  for  Junior  Exhibitions,  and  is  subject  to  the 
same  conditions  in  regard  to  the  age  and  collegiate  standing  of  com- 
petitors. 

3.  No  Kidd  Scholar  can  hold  a  Junior  Exhibition  or  a  Supplemented 
Erasmus  Smith  Exhibition. 

4.  The  Scholarship  is  forfeited  if  the  holder  incurs  any  heavy  col- 
legiate censure,  if  he  fails  to  proceed  regularly  with  his  class  (without 
leave  from  the  Board),  or  if  he  fails  to  attain  in  any  year  one  honor  of 
the  first  rank  or  two  honors  of  the  second  riink,  or  such  equivalent 
distinctions  as  are  recognized  in  the  Regulations  for  Supplemented 
Enismus  Smith  Exhibitions. 

The  Scholarship  will  be  awarded  in  1925. 


IRISH  SOCIETY  SCHOLARSHIP. 

The  Hon.  tlie  Irish  Society  offers  annually  to  women  Students 
a  Scholarship  of  £60  per  annum,  tenable  for  three  years  in  Trinity 
College,  Dublin,  subject  to  the  following  conditions  : — 

Candidates  must  have  studied  continuously  for  the  two  years  imme- 
diately previous  to  the  competition  at  an  Intermediate  School  in  the 
city  of  Londonderry,  or  in  the  town  of  Coleraine.  The  Scholarships 
will  be  allocated  to  Students  whose  means  are  insufficient  to  pay  the 
full  expenses  of  a  University  Course,  and  preference  will  be  given  to  a 
Student  who  is  preparing  for  the  profession  of  teaching. 

The  Scholarship  is  awarded  on  the  marks  obtained  by  candidates  in 
the  Senior  Grade  of  the  Irish  Intermediate  Examination. 

The  age  of  candidates  must  not  exceed  the  limit  allowed  by  the  Irish 
Intermediate  Board  to  candidates  for  Intermediate  Exhibitions  and 
Prizes. 

Details  of  conditions  of  tenure  can  be  obtained  from  the  Hon. 
Secretary  of  the  Londonderry  Scholarship  Committee,  Victoria 
High  School,  Londonderry. 


BIGGS  MEMORIAL  PKIZK. 

In  1905  the  friends  of  Richard  Biggs,  LL.D.,  founded  a  Prize  to 
be  called  "the  Biggs  Memorial  Prize,"  the  value  of  which  is 
about  £15  annually. 

It  is   awarded   to    the   best    of  those  competitors   for  Junior 
Exhibitions   (provided  sufficient  merit    is    shown)   who  enter 


192  PRIZES  AT    KNTKANCK. 

Trinity  College  and  who  have  been  pupils  for  at  least  one  year 
at  Chesterfield  School,  Birr  (or  such  other  school  at  Birr  as  may 
take  its  place),  at  Galway  Grammar  School,  or  at  Portora  Royal 
School. 

Candidates  must  forward  evidence  of  having  been  pupils  at 
one  of  these  schools  for  the  time  required  to  the  Senior  Lecturer 
before  the  Examination  for  Junior  Exhibitions  begins. 


HASLETT  MEMORIAL  SCHOLARSHIP. 

In  1907  tlie  friends  of  William  Woods  Haslett,  M.A.,  founded  a 
Scholarship  in  his  memory,  the  value  of  which  is  £25. 

It  is  awarded  to  the  best  of  those  competitors  for  Junior 
Exhibitions  (provided  sufficient  nieiit  is  shown)  who  enter 
Trinity  College,  and  who  have  been  for  the  two  preceding  years 
pupils  at  St.  Andrew's  College,  Dublin. 

Candidates  must  forward  evidence  of  having  been  pupils  at 
St.  Andrew's  College  for  the  time  required  to  the  Senior  Lecturer 
before  the  Examination  for  Junior  Exhibitions  begins. 


EXHIBITIONS   TO  WHICH  APPOINTMENTS  ARE  MADE 
WITHOUT  EXAMINATION. 

The  following  Exhibitions  are  awarded  to  Students  by  the  Board 
without  a  special  Examination  ;  they  are  paid  quarterly  through 
the  Tutors,  provided  that  the  holders  (1)  proceed  regularly  with 
their  class,  (2)  have  their  names  on  the  College  Books,  and  (3)  are 
under  Master's  standing: — 

Erasmus  Smith  ExhiUtioiis. — These  Exhibitions  were  founded 
by  the  Governors  of  Erasmus  Smith's  Schools,  and  the  foundation 
was  conhrmed  by  Act  of  Parliament  (10  Geo.  I.,  1723).  Students 
elected  by  the  Board  of  Erasmus  Smith  are  entitled  to  priority  in 
appointment  to  these  Exhibitions ;  and  those  not  so  filled  are  dis- 
posed of  by  the  Board.  The  annual  value  of  a  first-class  Erasmus 
Smith's  Exhibition  is  £7  7s.  S(/.,  and  of  a  second-class  do. 
£5  10s.  9J.  There  are  20  first-class  and  15  second-class  Exhi- 
bitions. 

Dotvnes  Exhibitions.— ¥i\e  Exhibitions  of  £10  annually  are 
available  for  Divinity  Students  of  narrow  means  and  academic 
merit. 

Worrall  Exhibitions. — The  Worrall  Exhibitioners,  in  accord- 
ance with  the  will  of  the  founder,  are  chosen  by  the  Board  from 
poor  scholars,  who  have  entered  as  Sizars,  the  sons  of  clergymen 
in  the  diocese  of  Dublin,  or,  in  default  of  such,  the  sons  of  citizens 
of  the  city  of  Dublin.  The  Fund  produces  annually  about 
£75,  and  the  annual  value  of  each  Exhibition  is  £9  4s.  8rf. 


EXHIBITIONS   AWARD ICD   WITHOUT   KXAMINATION.  193 

When  an  Exhibition  is  declared  to  be  vacant,  the  Tutors  are 
invited  to  state  to  tlie  Board  the  names  of  their  pupils  having  the 
qualitications  required  by  the  founder's  will,  and  such  other 
circumstances  as  may  guide  the  Board  in  their  selection. 

Crowe  Exhihiti(ms. — Seven  Exhibitions  of  £21  annually  are 
available  for  Divinity  Students,  sons  of  clergymen  of  the  Church 
of  Ireland  (preferably  from  the  Diocese  of  Tuam)  intending  to 
devote  themselves  to  the  Ministry  of  the  Church  of  Ireland. 

Span    Exhibitiims One    Exhibition     of    £15    annually    is 

available  for  a  student  of  narrow  means. 

Avary  Exhibitions. — There  are  two  Avary  Exhibitions ;  the 
annual  value  of  each  is  £4  12s.  Ad. ;  the  Exhibitioners  are  nomi- 
nated by  the  Provost  from  among  the  Sizars. 

Clanbrassil,  Stearne,  Parsons,  Yelverton,  Griffith,  and  Briyys 
Exhibitions  are  elected  to  by  the  Board  for  general  collegiate 
merit,  the  preference  being  generally  given  to  Scholars  on  the 
foundation.     The  annual  value  of  each  is  £4  12«.  4(i. 

The  Stearne  Fund  yields  annually  about  £50 ;  the  funds  of  the 
remainder  yield  a  total  income  of  about  £26. 

As  these  Exhibitions  are  payable  out  of  Special  Trust  Funds 
which  are  liable  to  fluctuation,  the  Board  reserve  to  themselves 
the  power  of  discontinuing  the  payment  of  them,  either  wholly 
or  in  part,  whenever  the  requisite  amount  is  not  forthcoming. 

Worth  Exhibitions Tliese  Exhibitions  were  granted,  in  1699, 

by  the  Hon.  "William  Worth,  of  the  city  of  Dublin,  who  granted 
for  the  purpose  a  charge  of  £20  Irish  upon  the  funds  of 
St.  Stephen's  Hospital,  Cork,  commonly  called  the  Blue  Coat 
School,  founded  by  him. 

William  Worth  appointed  that  four  Students  of  Trinity  College, 
Dublin,  with  a  preference  to  natives  of  the  city  and  county  of 
Cork,  should  be  selected  by  tlie  Bishop  of  Cork,  the  Mayor  of  Cork, 
the  heir-at-law  of  William  Worth,  and  the  Provost  of  Trinity 
College,  and  tlie  income  divided  equally  between  them.  In  1890 
the  Educational  Endowments  Commissioners  framed  a  scheme  for 
St.  Stephen's  Hospital,  Cork,  and  directed  that  the  £20  Irish  shall 
be  paid  by  the  Governors  of  the  Hospital  to  the  Senior  Bursar  of 
Trinity  College,  and  gave  the  Provost  and  Senior  Fellows  power  to 
regulate  the  conditions,  number,  amount,  and  tenure  of  the  Exhi- 
bitions. 

The  Board  has  decided  that  the  selection  of  the  Students  shall 
be  made  as  heretofore,  and  that  the  annual  income  of  £20  Irish 
shall  be  divided  into  two  Exhibitions,  the  Students  to  be  elected  for 
not  more  than  two  years,  and  to  be  capable  of  re-election. 


(     194     ) 


^miitwxxa  rjito  teljowt  €xnmmuti0n  to  btsrrbiiu} 
^ixxbtnta. 


ASSISTANCE  GIVEN  BY  THE  TUTORIAL  BODY. 

In  the  course  of  each  half-year  euding  with  the  first  Saturday 
in  June  or  December  each  Tutor  may  grant  exemptions  to  his 
pupils  from  tuition  fees  to  tlie  extent  of  four  guineas  for  every 
complete  hundred  guineas  paid  by  his  pupils  during  the  preceding 
half-year,  provided  that  he  may  always  grant  exemption  up  to 
the  extent  of  four  guineas  as  a  minimum  ;  and  provided  also  that 
in  the  case  of  futnre  Tutors  the  approval  of  the  Board  be  obtained 
for  the  exemptions  thus  given. 


THK  SALMON  FUND. 

In  October,  1894,  and  in  subsequent  years,  Rev.  George 
Salmon,  D.D.,  Provost,  transferred  sums  of  money  to  the  Board 
to  form  a  fund  "  for  helping  poor  students  to  pay  their  College 
fees,  giving  preference  to  sons  of  clergymen,"  which  now  amount 
to  £4932  19s.  1<K  The  fund  is  administered  by  the  Provost. 
Applications  for  assistance  are  made  to  him  through  the  Tutors. 


THE  FREDERICK  PURSER  GRADUATES'  FUND. 

In  Michaelmas  Term,  1910,  the  sum  of  £4000  was  presented  by 
John  Purser  Griffith,  m.inst.  c.e.,  and  Mrs.  Griffith,  to  institute 
a  Fund  in  memory  of  Professor  Frederick  Purser,  m.a.,  f.t.c.d. 
The  object  of  the  Fund  is  to  lend  at  nominal  interest  to  Graduates 
leaving  Trinity  College,  Dublin,  sums  of  money  which  may  assist 
them  to  attain  at  the  outset  of  their  several  careers  more  readily 
than  otherwise  to  permanent  positions.'' 

The  qualifications  which  will  principally  be  taken  into  con- 
sideration in  granting  these  loans  will  be — (1)  limited  means  of 
the  applicant  and  of  his  or  her  parents  or  guardians  ;  (2)  such 
general  distinction  and  character  during  his  or  her  College  course 
as  will  serve  as  a  guarantee  that  the  money  lent  will  be  applied 
to  what  is  likeh  to  prove  of  permanent  benefit  to  the  applicant. 

•  Such  as  say,  to  assist  an  Engineering  Student  who  has  graduated  in  tlie 
Engineering  Scliool  to  pay  tlic  fee  required  before  he  can  be  apprenticed  to  a  Practising 
Engineer.  This  case  is  merely  taken  as  an  example.  Any  Graduate  may  apply 
who  requires  assistance  at  the  outset  of  his  or  her  career. 


THE   FKEDEKICK   VUKSEK   GKADUATEs'   FCTND.  195 

Applications,  accompanied  by  particulars  as  to  the  qualifications 
of  the  applicant  and  as  to  the  object  and  destination  of  the  loan, 
should  be  made  to  the  Trustees  of  the  Fund  through  the  Tutor  ; 
and  the  Tutor  of  each  applicant,  and  some  of  the  Professors  or 
Teachers  of  Trinity  College  with  whom  the  applicant  has  been 
associated  in  his  or  her  studies,  are  to  be  requested  by  him  or  her 
to  send  recommendations  direct  to  the  Trustees.  All  communi- 
cations will  be  regarded  as  strictly  confidential. 

It  is  only  in  exceptional  circumstances  that  any  single  loan  will 
exceed  £100.  Interest  will  be  charged  at  one  per  cent,  per  annum, 
payable  hall-yearly.  A  recipient  of  a  loan  must  enter  into  an  under- 
taking to  keep  the  Trustees  acquainted  M'ith  his  or  her  residence,  to  pay 
the  interest  legularly,  and  when  remunerative  employment  is  obtained 
to  repay  the  principal  by  instalments  within  a  reasonable  time,  that  time 
to  be  fixed  by  the  Trustees  in  each  case  according  to  the*  nature  of  the 
remunerative  employment  which  bus  been  obtained.  If  the  principal 
is  repaid  within  three  years  from  the  time  the  loan  is  made,  the  interest 
paid  will  he  refunded. 

The  Trustees  meet  to  consider  applications  on  the  last  Tuesday 
of  each  month  during  Term,  and  on  the  first  day  of  Michaelmas 
Term.  No  application  will  be  considered  unless  it  shall  have 
reached  the  Trustees  at  least  three  clear  days  before  their  day 
of  meeting.  Communications  to  be  addressed  to  Dr.  L.  C.  Purser, 
35  Trinity  College,  Dublin. 


THE  FREDERICK  PURSER  UNDERGRADUATES'  FUND. 

In  Hilary  Term,  1911,  the  sum  of  £3000  was  given  by  John 
Purser  Griffith,  m.inst.  c.e.,  and  Mrs.  GriflBth,  to  institute  a 
fund  in  memory  of  the  late  Professor  Frederick  Purser,  m.a., 
F.T.C.D.,  to  be  called  "  The  Frederick  Purser  Undergraduates' 
Fund,"  with  tlie  object  of  helping  some  Sopliister  Students  of 
limited  means  who  have  shown  promise  in  their  previous  Course, 
so  as  to  enable  them  to  derive  the  most  benefit  possible  from  the 
teaching  of  the  Sopliister  years,  whether  in  Arts  or  in  the 
Professional  Schools ;  and  to  save  tliem,  as  far  as  may  be,  from 
being  compelled  to  divert  their  energies  into  other  activities  in 
order  to  obtain  necessary  means  of  livelihood. 

The  whole  sura  available  for  distribution  will  be  about  £50  for 
the  first  year  and  £100  for  each  succeeding  year. 

Applications,  accompanied  by  particulars  as  to  the  qualifications 
and  prospects  of  tlie  applicant,  should  be  made  to  the  Trustees  of 
the  Fund  through  the  Tutor  ;  and  the  Tutor  of  each  applicant, 
and  some  of  the  Teachers  in  Trinity  College  with  whom  the 
applicant  has  been  associated  in  his  or  her  studies,  are  to  be 
requested  by  him  or  her  to  send  recommendations  direct  to 
the  Trustees.  All  communications  will  be  regarded  as  strictly 
confidential. 

k2  / 


196  GOLD   MUDALIJSTs'   WAll   FUND. 

The  Trustees  meet  to  consider  applications  on  the  last  Tuesday 
in  October.  No  application  will  be  considered  unless  it  shall 
have  reached  the  Trustees  at  latest  on  the  Friday  before  the  day 
on  which  the  Trustees  meet. 

Communications  to  be  addressed  to  Dr.  L.  C.  Purser,  35  Trinity 
College,  Dublin. 


GOLD  MEDALLISTS'  WAR  FUND. 

Eauly  in  the  year  1918  the  Right  Hon.  Sir  J.  H.  M.  Campbell, 
Bart.,  Vice-Chancellorof  the  University,  acting  on  the  suggestion 
of  the  Rev.  R.  Norwood,  formed  a  Committee  for  the  purpose  of 
inviting  former  Senior  Moderators  and  the  Gold  Medallists  of 
the  College  Societies  to  devote  their  medals  towards  raising  a 
Fund  to  provide  a  memorial  to  the  Trinity  College  men  who  had 
fallen  in  the  war,  the  form  of  the  memorial  to  be  decided  by  the 
Committee  when  the  amount  of  the  Fund  should  be  known.  The 
Board  of  Trinity  College  agreed  to  present  to  each  donor  a  replica 
of  his  medal  in  bronze.  In  accordance  with  suggestions  made  by 
the  donors  of  the  medals,  the  Committee  drew  up  the  following 
regulations,  which  have  been  approved  by  the  Board  of  Trinity 
College : — 

The  Fund  shall  be  invested  in  the  name  of  the  Provost,  Fellows,  and 
Scholars  of  Trinity  College,  and  shall  be  held  by  them  subject  to  the 
following  conditions  :— 

1.  The  Trustees  for  the  administration  of  the  Fund  shall  be  the 
Vice-Chancellor  of  the  University,  the  Lord  Chief  Justice,  the  Provost, 
the  Bursar,  and  the  Junior  Bursar. 

2.  They  shall  devote  the  interest  and  capital  of  the  Fund  (so  far  as 
the  latter  shall  he  necessary)  towards  the  education  and  advancement 
of  such  of  the  children  or  immediate  dependents  of  members  of  the 
University,  whether  graduates  or  undergraduates,  who  have  fallen  in 
the  war  as  the  Trustees  in  their  sole  discretion  may  select. 

3.  If  in  the  opinion  of  the  Trustees  all  proper  claims  under  (2)  have 
been  exhausted,  then  llie  Trustees  shall  devote  the  remainder  of  the 
Fund,  whether  as  to  capital  or  interest,  to  such  purposes  as  may  seejn 
to  them  most  nearly  in  accordance  with  the  original  purpose  set  out  in 
the  preceding  paragraph. 

Tiie  amount  of  the  Fund  handed  to  the  Board  on  25th  June, 
1921,  was  £1465  12s, 

Applicants  should  send  in  their  claims  to  the  Bursar. 


197    ) 


SUMMARY  OF  SCHOLARSHIPS,  EXHIBITIONS,  AND 
PRIZES,  AWARDED  BY  EXAMINATION  IN  THE 
UNIVERSITY    OF    TRINITY   COLLEGE,    DUBLIN. 

At  Entrance:  — 

Every  year  16  Junior  Exhibitions,  12  of  £20,  and  4  of  £15,  a 
year  for  two  years,  and  every  fourth  year  the  Kidd  Scholarship, 
value  about  £80  a  year  for  four  years. 

Additional  Exhibitions  or  Prizis  may  also  be  given  by  the 
Board  at  their  discretion  to  deserving  candidates. 

Twenty-six  Entrance  Prizes,  namely,  a  First  of  £5  and  a 
Second  of  £2  in  each  of  the  following  subjects : — Greek  Verse, 
Latin  Verse,  Greek  Prose,  Latin  Prose,  English  Literature  and 
Composition,  English  History  and  Modern  Geograpliy,  French, 
German,  Hebrew,  Experimental  Science,  Natural  Science,  Modem 
Irish,  Scripture. 

About  10  Sizarships  annually,  in  Mathematics,  Classics, 
French  and  German,  Experimental  Science,  Natural  Science, 
Hebrew,  and  Irish,  awarded  by  examination  in  June,  and 
limited  to  poor  students. 

The  Charles  Wilkins  Memorial  Prize  in  Mathematics,  £10,  for 
Women. 

In  any  year  of  their  Course  Students  may  compete  for: — 

About  16  Foundation  Scholarships  for  men,  awarded  annually 
in  Mathematics,  Chissics,  Mental  and  Moral  Philosophy,  Experi- 
mental Science,  Natural  Science,  History  and  Political  Science, 
Fi-ench, 'German,  Italian.  Successful  candidates  are  styled  Scholars 
of  the  House,  and  are  members  of  the  Corporation  of  Trinity 
College ;  they  receive  a  salary  of  £20  Irish,  have  their  Commons 
free,  their  rooms  at  a  reduced  charge,  pay  only  quarterly  tuition 
fees  of  £1  Is.,  and  their  Scholarships  last  ustially  for  5  years. 

Non-Foundation  Scholarship,  in  the  same  subjects,  for  women, 
value  £30  a  year,  with  exemption  from  ordinary  College  Fees, 
save  Tuition  Fees. 

The  Marshall  Porter  Memorial  Prize,  £20,  is  awarded  annually  to 
the  mostdeserving  unsuccessful  candidate  for  Classical  Scholarship. 

Ttnn  Honors  and  Frizes,  and  Prizes  at  Lectures :  — 

Every  Term  Examinations  are  held,  at  which  Honors  of  tlie  First 
and  Second  Rank  are  awarded  to  Candidates  who  exhibit  sufficient 
merit.  In  Michaelmas  Term,  Prizes  of  £4  and  £2  are  awarded 
to  Candidates  who  obtain  First  and  Second  Honors,  respectively. 
Two  Prizes  of  £1  10«.  each,  for  Composition,  are  awarded  each 
Term,  one  in  each  class,  to  Freshman  students  attending  the 
Honor  Lectures  in  Classics,  similar  Prizes  are  awarded  in 
French  and  in  German,  and  similar  Prizes  are  awarded  for 
Composition  in  English  to  the  students  attending  tlie 
Professor's  Lectures,  one  for  Freshman  students  and  one  for 
Sophisters. 


198  SUMMARY  OF  PRIZES  A.WA.R1)KD  BY  EXAMINATION. 

Prizes  and  Exhibitions  open  for  Competition  :— 

III  the  Junior  Freshman  year :  — 

Term  Prizes  (see  above)  in  Michaelmas  Term  in  :  Mathematics, 
Classics,  Mental  and  Moral  Philosophy,  Experimental  Science, 
Natural  Science,  History,  English  Literature,  French,  German, 
Italian,  Spanish,  Old  and  Middle  Irish. 

Composition  Prizes  every  Term  (see  above),  at  the  Honor 
Lectures  in  Classics,  French,  German,  and  English. 

Catechetical  Prizes,  £2  each,  at  all  the  Lectures  and  Exami- 
nations, to  Students  who  exhibit  sufficient  merit. 

The  Townsend  Memorial  Prize  in  Mathematics,  £23,  awarded 
on  the  results  of  the  Honor  Examinations  in  Mathematics. 

In  the  Senior  Freshman  year:  — 

Term  Prizes  (see  above)  in  Michaelmas  Term  in :  Mjthematics, 
Classics,  Mental  and  Moral  Philosophy,  Experimental  Science, 
Natural  Science,  History,  lilnglish  Literature,  French,  German, 
Italian,  Spanisli,  Old  and  Middle  Irish. 

Prizes  for  Composition  every  Term  (see  above),  at  the  Honor 
Lectures  in  Classics,  French,  German,  and  English. 

Catechetical  Prizes,  £2  each,  at  all  the  Lectures  and  Exami- 
nations, to  Students  who  exhibit  sufficient  merit. 

Sixteen  Senior  Exhibitions,  twelve  of  £20,  and  four  of  £  1 5  a  year 
for  2  years,  awarded  on  the  results  of  the  Final  Freshman  Exami- 
nation and  the  Honor  Examinations  of  the  Senior  Freshman  year. 
Additional   Exhibitions  or  Prizes   may  also  be  given  by  the 
Board  at  their  discretion  to  deserving  Candidates. 

The  Jellett  Prizes,  £5  and  £3,  for  first  and  second  places  at  the 
Final  Freshman  Examination  held  at  the  end  of  Trinity  Term. 

The  Michael  Roberts  Prize,  £7,  in  Mathematics  ;  the 
William  Roberts,  £6  in  Classics;  the  Dunbar  Ingram,  £8, 
in  Modern  History  ;  and  the  Littledale,  £8  in  English 
Literature ;  awarded  at  the  Term  Prize  Examinations  in 
Michaelmas  Term ;  the  Dompierre-Chaufepie  Prize,  £8,  in 
French,  at  the  Trinity  Term  Honor  Examination  in  French  ;  the 
Minchin  Prize,  about  £10,  for  general  academic  attainments 
and  scientific  proficiency. 

In  the  Junior  Sophister  year  :  — 

Term  Prizes  in  Michaelmas  Term  in :  Mathematics,  Classics, 
Mental  and  .Moral  Philosophy,  Experimental  Science,  Natural 
Science,  History  and  Political  Science,  Modern  Literature,  Legal 
and  Political  Science,  Celtic  Languages. 

Catechetical  Prizes,  £2  each,  at  all  the  Examinations  to  Stu- 
dents who  exhibit  sufficient  merit. 

The  Mullins  Classical  Exhibition,  value  about  £30,  awarded 
on  the  results  of  the  nine  Classical  Honor  and  Prize  Examina- 
tions of  the  Freshman  and  Junior  Sopliister  years. 

The  Lloyd  Exhibition  in  Mathematics,'  value  about  £15  a 
year  for  2  years,  awarded  at  the  Term  Prize  Examination  in 
Michaelmas  Term. 


SUMMAUY  OP  PKlZES  AWAKDKD  BY  EXAMINATION.    .        l99 

The  Dr.  Ilemy  Hutchinson  Stewart  Literary  Scholarship, 
value  £'},b  a  year  for  3  years,  awarded  on  the  results  of  the  Term 
Honor  and  Prize  Examination,  in  French,  German,  Itilianj 
Spanish,  and  Knglish  Liieraturo,  in  the  Freshman  and  Junior 
Sophister  years. 

The  Cliiff  Memorial  Prize,  about  £12,  in  Modern  History^ 
awarded  at  the  Term  Prize  Examination  in  Michaelmas  Term* 
In  the  Senior  Sophister  year:  — 

The  "W'ray  Prize,  £28,  in  Mental  and  Moral  Philosophy, 
awarded  at  a  special  Examination  in  Hilary  Term. 

The  Degree  Examination  can  be  passed  by  answering  in  any  of 
the  followiag  Courses: — Mathematics,  Classics,  Mental  and  Moral 
Philosophy,  Experimental  Science,  Natural  Science,  History  and 
Poliliciil  Science,  Modern  Literature,  Legal  and  Political  Science, 
Engineering  Science,  Celtic  Languages,  Oriental  Languages. 
Successful  Candidates  are  styled  Senior  nr  Junior  Moderators, 
and  receive  Gold  or  Silver  Medals.  A  Studentsliip,  not  exceeding 
£100  a  year  for  five  years,  and  a  Brooke  Prize  of  about  £44  10«. 
are  awarded  to  the  first  and  second  answerers,  respectively,  in 
Mathematics,  combined  M'ith  another  Course  ;  and  a  Studentship 
and  Brooke  Prize  of  similar  values  are  awarded  to  the  first 
and  second  answerers,  respectively,  in  Classics,  combined  with 
another  Course. 

Also  Prizes  of  Viilue  not  less  than  £50  may  be  awarded  to 
Moderators  who  have  specially  distinguished  themselves,  but  in 
general  conditions  as  to  research  or  study  will  be  imposed. 

Scholars  who  obtain  Senior  Moderatorships  are  usually  granted 
Exhibitions  of  £10  a  year  for  3  years. 

The  King  Edward  Prize  of  £10  is  awarded  to  the  Respondent 
■who  answers  best  at  the  Degree  Examination  in  December. 

The  FitzGerald  Memorial  Scholarship  and  Medal  in  Experi- 
mental Science,  £60. 

Catechetical  Prizes,  value  £2  each,  are  awarded  at  the  Term 
Examinations  to  Students  who  exhibit  sufficient  merit. 
In  the  Junior  Sophister  and  subsequent  years  to  M.A.  standing  : — 

Prizes  in  Biblical  Greek,  £15. 
In  the  Junior  Bachelor  year:  — 

The  Bishop  Law  Prizes,  value  £20  and  £10,  in  Mathematics, 
in  Michaelmas  Term. 
For  Graduates  of  not  more  than  8  years  standing:  — 

The  Elrington  Theological  Prize,  value  £50,  for  an  Essay  on  a 
Theological  subject. 
For  Graduates:  — 

The  Whately  Memorial  Prize  in  Political  Economy,  every  fifth 
year,  value  about  £60,  awarded  for  an  Essay  on  a  specified 
Economic  subject. 

At  the  Examination  for  Fellowship,  the  first  nuin  out  receives 
tlie  Madden  Prize,  value  not  exceeding  £400  (Irisli),  and  to 
unsuccessful  Candidates  the  Board  usually  grant  Prizes,  varying 
from  £60  to  £20,  in  order  to  encourage  them  in  reading  for 
Fellowship. 


200  SUMMARY  OF  rillZKS  AWARDED  BY  EXAMINATION. 

In  any  year  of  their  College  Course  up  to  M.A.  standing : — 

Students  may  compete  for  the  following  special  Scholarships  or 
Prizes,  which  are  all  awarded  annually,  unless  a  statement  to  the 
contrary  is  made  :  — 

In  Mathematics: — 

The  M'CuUagh  Prizes,  value  £30  and  £20,  on  a  special  course. 

Classics : — 

Bishop  Berkeley's  Gold  Medals  (2),  on  a  special  subject. 

Vice-Chancellor's  Latin  Medals  (2  Gold),  on  a  special  subject. 

Two  Vice-Chancellor's  Prizes,  value  £20  each,  for  Composi- 
tions on  special  subjects. 

Tlie  Ferrar  Memorial  Prize,  £17  for  Comparative  Philology, 
a  special  course  being  set. 

Tyrrell  Memorial  Gold  Medal,  every  second  year,  for  Com- 
position. 

History  and  Political  Science  : — 

Prize  in  Political  Economy,  £15  in  Trinity  Term. 

The  Blake  National  History  Scholarship,  every  fourth  year, 
value  about  £92  a  year  for  four  years,  awarded  for  an  Essay 
on  a  specified  subject. 

Ancient  History  and  Classical  Archaeology,  £5. 

English :  — 

The  Vice- Chancellor's  Prizes,  £20  and  £20,  for  English  Prose 
and  English  Verse. 

Prize  in  Old  and  Middle  English,  £10  10s. 
Languages : — 

Hebrew,  Chaldee,  and  Syriac,  £40  ;  Arabic,  £10  ;  Hindustani, 
£b  ;  Persian,  £5  ;  Sanskrit,  £10  :  all  awarded  by  Examination  to 
Students  attending  the  corresponding  Lectures.  Prizes  in  Iiish, 
£20  ;  Old  French  and  ProvenQal,  £5.  The  Ferguson  Memorial 
Prize  in  Celtic  Literature,  every  third  year,  £25. 

In  Subjects  connected  with  the  Study  of  Divinity : — 

"Wall  Biblical  Scholarship,  value  £20  a  year  for  five  years. 
In  Ecclesiastical  History,  £10  and  £5. 

Prizes  in  the  Professional  Schools:  — 

Frizes  in  the  School  of  Divinity :  — 

Each  Term  two  Prizes  for  Composition,  value  £2  each,  one  for 
the  Senior  Class,  and  one  for  the  Junior.  The  Carson  Biblical 
Prize,  £15.  The  Toplady  Memorial  Prize,  £6  5s.  The  Ryan 
Prize,  £3.  Archbishop  King's  Divinity  Prizes,  £12,  £8. 
Bishop  Forster's  Divinity  Prizes,  £17.  The  Downes'  Divinity 
Premiums:  for  Written  Composition,  £12  and  £8  ;  for  Oratory, 
£6  and  £4  ;  and  for  Reading  the  Liturgy,  £5,  £2 ;  Pastoral 
Theology,  £2.  The  Warren  Church  Formularies  Prize,  £10. 
The  Robert  King  Memorial  Prize  in  Ecclesiastical  History,  £4. 
The  O'Regan  Memorial  Prize,  £5.  The  "Weir  Prize  in  Holy 
Scripture,  £5.  Two  Theological  Exhibitions,  value  £60  and 
£20  a  year,  tenable  for  three  years.     The  Kyle  Irish  Prize,  £12. 


SUMMARY  OF  PRIZES  AWARDED  BT  RXAMIKATION.  201 

A  Bedell  Scholarship  of  £20  a  year  for  four  years,  and  a  Bedell 
Prize  of  £10,  are  awarded  from  time  to  time. 

Frizes  in  the  School  of  Law  : — 

At  the  end  of  Trinity  Term  Prizes  amounting  to  £45  may  be 
awarded  by  the  Professors  to  the  best  answerers  of  the  Students 
attending  their  Lectures. 

Prizes  in  the  School  of  Physic :  — 

A  Begley  Studentship  of  about  £37  a  year  for  four  years, 
awarded  annually. 

The  Kingsmill  Jones  Memorial  Prize  of  about  £15,  awarded 
annually. 

A  Medical  Scholarship  of  £20  a  year  for  two  years,  and  a 
Dr.  Henry  Hutchinson  Stewart  Scholarship  of  £10  a  year  for 
three  years,  in  Chemistry,  Physics,  Botany,  and  Zoology,  open 
to  Students  who  have  not  completed  two  years. 

A  Medical  Scholarship  of  £20  a  year  for  two  years,  and  a 
Dr.  Henry  Hutchinson  Stewart  Scholarship  of  £10  a  year  for 
three  years,  in  Anatomy  and  Institutes  of  Medicine,  open  to 
Students  who  have  not  completed  three  years. 

The  Daniel  John  Cunningham  Medal  and  Prize,  awarded 
at  the  Intermediate  Medical  Examination,  Part  I.,  in  June, 
to  the  student  who  obtains  highest  marks  in  Anatomy,  and 
completes  the  Examination. 

The  John  Mallet  Purser  Medal  in  Physiology  and  Histology, 
awarded  at  the  Intermediate  Medical  Examination  Part  I.  in  June, 
open  to  Students  who  have  not  spent  more  than  three  years  in  the 
School. 

The  Fitzpatrick  Scholarship  of  about  £32  is  awarded  annually 
to  the  Student  who  obtains  the  highest  aggregate  marks  at  the 
five  sections  of  the  Final  Medical  Examination,  provided  that  his 
Medical  Course  shall  have  been  completed  in  the  prescribed  time 
of  five  years. 

A  Medical  Travelling  Prize,  and  a  Surgical  Travelling  Prize, 
each  of  £100,  in  alternate  years,  open  in  Trinity  Term  to  Students 
who  have  passed  the  Final  Examination  in  Medicine,  or  in  Surgery, 
as  the  case  may  be,  within  two  years  from  the  beginning  of  the 
Term.  The  John  Banks  Medal  is  awarded  to  the  winner  of 
the  Medical  Travelling  Prize,  and  the  John  Banks  Prize  of  about 
£15  to  the  second  best  answerer.  The  Edward  Hallaran  Bennett 
Medal  is  awarded  to  the  winner  of  the  Surgical  Travelling  Prize, 
and  the  Edward  Hallaran  Bennett  Prize  to  the  second  best 
answerer. 

The  following  Piizes  are  granted  by  the  Professors :  —Institutes 
of  Medicine,  £G  and  £4  ;  Practice  of  Medicine,  £5 ;  Materia 
Medica,  £5  ;  Medical  Jurisprudence,  £5  ;  Midwifery,  £5. 

In  the  School  of  Engineering  : — 

A  Prize  in  Geology  and  Mineralogy  of  £10  to  third  year's  men, 
and  one  of  £b  to  second  year's  men. 

A  great  number  of  the  above  Prizes,   &c.,  are  paid  out  of 
Special  Trust  Funds,  and  accordingly  are  subject  to  variation, 
so  that  the  amounts  given  must  be  taken  as  approximate  values. 
k3 


(     202     ) 


grofc.'ifiioital  Schools. 

The  Testiinoniuins  in  the  School  of  Divinity,  and  the  Degrees, 
Licenses,  or  Diplomas  in  the  Schools  of  Physic,  Engineering,  and 
A"riculture  can  only  be  obtained  by  attending  prescribed  Courses 
of  Lecfc«ires  during  two  or  more  years,  and  passing  certain 
Kxaminations. 

Students  seeking  credit  for  a  Terra  by  Lectures  must,  at  the 
coraraenceraent  of  such  Terra,  duly  register  with  the  Clerk  of  the 
Books  their  places  of  residence  for  tliat  Term,  and  during  Term 
notify  a  change  of  residence  :  if  this  rule  be  not  observed,  credit 
for  the  Term  cannot  be  allowed. 


DIVIiNITY  SCHOOL. 

§  I.  Geneual  Rules. 

In  order  to  obtain  the  Divinity  Testimonium,  Students  must 
pass  the  Regius  Professor's  Final  Examination,  having  previously 
kept  the  Divinity  Terms  of  two  years  :  during  the  tirst  year 
with  Archbishop'  King's  Professo'r  of  Divinity;  during  the 
second  with  the  Regius  Professor.  Each  year  consists  of  three 
Terms,  viz.  Michaelmas  Term,  beginning  near  the  end  of  October ; 
Hilary  Term,  beginning  near  the  end  of  January  ;  Trinity  Term, 
beo-innin"'  near  the  end  of  April.  The  Lectures  of  each  Term 
las^t  about  eight  weeks.  It  is  regular  to  keep  the  Terms  in  the 
order  just  stated  ;  but  this  is  not  insisted  on,  and  a  Student  may 
enter  the  Divinity  School  at  the  beginning  of  any  Term.  When  a 
Student  has  completed  his  attendance  on  three  Terms'  Lectures, 
and  has  satisfied  the  other  requirements  stated  below,  he  presents 
himself  at  an  Examination  held  by  Archbishop  King's  Professor. 
A  Student  cannot  obtain  credil  for  his  tirst  year,  and  is  not 
permitted  to  commence  attendance  with  the  Regius  Professor, 
until  he  has  passed  this  Examination. 

Students  in  Divinity  are  required  to  attend  the  Services  in  the 
Colleo-e  Chapel  during  Lecture  Term,  and  they  must  satisfy  the 
Keu-ius  Professor  or  Archbishop  King's  Professor  that  they  are 
habitual  communicants  of  the  Church  of  Ireland.  This  rule  does 
not  apply  to  a  Student  who  is  not  a  member  of  the  Church  of 
Ireland,  or  of  a  Church  in  communion  therewith;  but  be  will 
not  receive  the  ordinary  Testimonium  at  the  end  of  the  Second 
Year,  a  special  form  being  substituted  for  it. 


DtTtNltY  SCHOOt.  203 

Students  in  Divinity  who  are  also  Students  in  Arts  are  not 
entitled  to  claim  Piofessional  Privileges  in  any  Term  in  which 
they  substitute  for  Classics  one  of  the  other  Courses  in  Arts. 

No  Student  can  present  himself  for  Entrance  into  the  Divinity 
School  who  has  not  kept  at  least  four  Terms  of  the  Freshman 
Catechetical  Course,  or  passed  an  examination  in  the  whole  Senior 
Fresliman  Catechetical  Course. 

Tlie  Lecturer  in  the  English  I'ihle  delivers  a  two  years' 
Course  of  Lectures  on  Tuesdays  and  Fridays  at  11  o'clock. 
A  Student  may  attend  this  Course  in  whole  or  in  part  before 
he  has  entered  the  Divinity  School,  and  it  is  advisable  in  most 
cases  to  do  so  as  early  as  possible.  It  is  necessary  for  every 
student  to  obtain  credit  for  attendance  on  this  Course  before  he 
can  receive  the  Divinity  Testimonium. 

A  Hostel  in  connexion  with  the  Divinity  School  has  been 
established  by  the  General  Synod  of  the  Church  of  Ireland,  and 
recognized  by  the  Hoard  of  Trinity  College  as  a  registered  place 
of  residence  for  Divinity  Students.  A  prospectus  will  he  furnished 
on  ap[)lication  to  the  Warden,  25,  Mountjoy  Square,  Dublin. 

S  IT".  Admission  to  tiik  Divinity  School. 

Students  who  have  completed  their  Junior  Sophister  Year,  and 
who  have  obtained  satisfactory  marks  in  Greek  and  Latin,  may 
enter  the  Divinity  School ;  but  none  but  those  who  have  passed 
the  Degree  Examination,  or  who  are  Senior  Sophisters,  and 
qualified  to  present  themselves  at  the  Degree  Examination  in  the 
following  December,  are  permitted  to  join  the  Senior  Divinity 
Class.  It  is  possible  for  a  Student  to  obtain  his  Testimonium 
without  paying  any  fees  in  addition  to  those  necessary  for 
•obtaining  his  Degree  of  Rachelor  in  Arts  ;  because  the  names 
of  Graduate  Divinity  Students  completing  their  last  Term  of 
Divinitv  Lectures  of  the  Senior  Year  in  the  June  Quarter  are 
not  struck  oii  the  College  books  until  after  the  Final  Exami- 
nation of  the  Ilegius  Professor  of  Divinity;  but  they  are  not 
thereby  entitled  to  the  payment  of  the  June  quarter  of  any 
Exhibition  or  Prize  they  may  hold. 

Students  of  lower  standing  than  Senior  Sophisters  who  are 
candidates  for  Moderatorship,  and,  in  special  cases,  those  who 
do  not  intend  to  pursue  the  Course  in  Arts,  are  allowed  to 
present  themselves  at  the  Examination  for  Entrance  into  the 
Divinitv  School ;  but  it  is  necessary  for  them  to  obtain  written 
permission  from  Archbishop  King's  Professor.  They  are  required 
to  make  application  for  such  permission  a  month  before  the  com- 
mencement of  the  Lectures  they  propose  to  attend  ;  and  they 
ought  to  state  fully  what  grounds  there  are  for  dealing  with  them 
exceptionally,  and  in  particular  whether  they  have  received  an 
education  in  Arts  elsewhere. 

/ 


204  DIVINITY   SCHOOL. 

Any  man  who  has  served  abroad  in  the  navy  or  army  during  the 
years  1914-1918,  shall,  if  he  receive  a  recommendation  from  a 
bishop,  be  permitted  to  present  himself  at  the  Entrance  Examina- 
tion to  the  Divinity  Scliool  at  any  time  after  passing  the  Entrance 
Examination  to  the  University,  and  if  he  pass  the  Entrance 
Examination  to  the  Divinity  School,  he  sliallbe  allowed  to  proceed 
with  his  Divinity  Course. 

Students  wishing  to  enter  the  Divinity  School  should  give  notice 
of  their  intention  to  Archbishop  King's  Professor  not  less  than 
seven  days  before  the  date  of  the  Entrance  Examination. 

The  examination  for  Entrance  to  the  Divinity  School  embraces 
the  following  courses  : — 

I.  The   Greek   text  of   the   Gospel  according  to  St.  Mark,  with 

questions  on  Greek  Grammar. 
11.  Butler,  Sermons  i.,  ii.,  and  iii.  ;  with  Preface  and  Dissertation 
on  Virtue. 

III.  Mackenzie's  Manual  of  Ethics,  Books  i.  and  ii. 

IV.  'the    Senior    Freshman    Catechetical    Course,    viz.,     Genesis, 

Exodus,  i.-xx.,  incl.,   1  &  2  Samuel,  1  &  2  Kings. 

All  Students  must  pass  in  Courses  II.  and  III. 

All  Students,  whetlier  Graduates  or  Undergraduates,  who  have 
not  obtained  satisfactory  marks  in  Greek  at  the  Final  Freshman 
Examination,  must  pass  in  Course  I. 

Students  who  have  completed  four  Terms  of  the  Freshman 
Catechetical  Course  are  excused  from  Course  IV. 

§  III.  Junior  Divinity  Yeak. 

In  each  Term  Archbishop  King's  Professor  of  Divinity  delivers 
a  Course  of  Prelections,  on  Mondays  and  Thursdays,  at  eleven 
o'clock,  in  the  Divinity  School ;  and  on  the  same  days  his 
Assistants  lecture  at  noon.  One  or  more  of  the  Assistants  may, 
as  need  shall  require,  lecture  at  one  o'clock.  The  subjects  of 
these  Prelections  and  Lectures  are  given  below.  On  Tuesdays 
and  Fridays  the  Lecturer  in  the  English  Bible  delivers  a  Course 
of  Lectures  at  eleven  o'clock  (see  p.  203).  Archbishop  King's 
Professor  is  authorized  to  require  that  Students  whom  he  con- 
siders deficient  in  Greek  should  attend  such  of  the  Tutorial 
Lectures  in  Greek  as  may  be  deemed  suitable.  A  Student  cannot 
obtain  credit  for  having  kept  a  Term,  if  he  shall  have  absented 
himself  more  than  once  from  any  Course  of  Lectures  by  Archbishop 
King's  Professor,  or  by  his  Assistants,  or  by  the  Lecturer  in  the 
Plnglish  Bible  in  such  Term,  unless  in  the  case  of  sickness  or 
some  other  unavoidable  impediment,  when  the  omission  of  a 
number  of  Lectures,  not  exceeding  one-fourth  of  the  whole,  may 
be  allowed  if  approved  by  the  Board. 

Each  Assistant  Lecturer  holds  an  examination  of  his  own  class 
at  the  end  of  each  Term. 


DIVINITY  SCHOOL.  206 

It  is  within  the  discretion  of  Archbishop  Kinj^^'s  Professor  to 
deliver  a  further  course  of  Prelections  on  a  subject  of  his  own 
choice  on  Wednesdays  at  eleven  o'clock,  attendance  at  which  is 
compulsory. 

The  Professor  is  empowered  to  require,  at  his  discretion,  from 
the  Students,  during  each  Term,  written  answers  to  questions  on 
the  subjects  of  his  Prelections. 

On  the  first  Lecture  day  of  each  Term  an  Examination  is  held 
in  a  portion  of  the  Greek  Testament,  at  which  all  Students  in 
the  Class,  of  whatever  standing,  must  present  themselves. 
Students  who  fail  to  pass  a  satisfactory  Examination  in  the 
appointed  Course  of  Greek  on  the  first  day  of  Term  are  required 
to  attend  Tutorial  Lectures  in  Greek  during  Term,  as  provided 
above. 

Examinations  in  Ecclesiastical  History  are  held  on  the  first 
days  of  Lectures  in  Hilary  and  Trinity  Terms.  These  two  pre- 
liminary Examinations  must  be  passed  before  the  Student  is 
allowed  to  present  himself  at  the  Examination  with  which  the 
Divinity  Course  for  tlie  first  year  closes. 

Six  days,  not  ordinary  Lecture  Days,  are  appointed  in  eiich 
Terra  for  English  Composition;  and  credit  for /owr  attendances 
at  least  is  neceesary  for  keeping  the  Term.  A  premium  of  £2 
is  awarded  by  tlie  Board  in  each  Term,  on  the  recommendation 
of  Archbishop  King's  Professor,  to  the  Student  who  shall  bave 
sent  in  the  thi-ee  written  Essay*  of  highest  merit. 

'I'he  following  are  the  Subjects  prescribed  for  the  Lectures  and 
Examinations  of  each  Terra  : — 

Michaelmas  Term. — On  the  first  Lecture  Day  Students  are  examined 

in  the  Greek  Text  of  Acts,  i.-xii.,  incl. 
(Candidates  are  expected  to  be  acquainted  with  the  renderings  of 

the  Revised  Version  of  the  New  Testament.) 
Archbishop  King's  Professor  delivers  a  Course  of  Prelections  on 

The  Revelation  of  Christ,  its  evidence  and  history  ;  and  his 

Assistants  lecture  on  the  Gi'eek  text  of  one  of  the  Synoptic 

Gospels. 

Hilary  Term. — On  the  first  Lecture  Day  Students  are  examined  in 
the  Greek  Text  of  the  Epistles  to  the  Galatians  and  the 
Philippians ;  and  also  in  F.  J.  Foakes  Jackson's  History  of 
the  Christian  Church,  chaps,  iv,  v,  vii,  viii,  x-xiii. 
Archbishop  King's  Professor  lectures  on  The  Doctrine  of  the 
Incarnation,  and  his  Assistants  lecture  on  Maclear's  Intro- 
duction to  the  Creeds. 

Trinity  Term. — On  the  first  Lecture  Day  Students  are  examined 
in  the  Greek  Text  of  Acts,  xiii.-xxviii.,  incl.  ;  and  also  in 
F.  J.  Foakes  Jackson's  History  of  the  Christian  Church, 
chaps,  xiv-xix. 
Archbishop  King's  Professor  lectures  on  The  Authority, 
Inspiration,  and  Criticism  of  the  Bible :  and  hi?  Assistants 
lecture  on  the  Greek  Text  of  the  Epistle  to  the  Romans. 

/ 


206  DIVINITY  sctfaoti 

When  a  Student  has  obtained  credit,  according  to  the  regula- 
tions already  specified,  for  attendance  at  the  Lectures  of  three 
Terras,  he  completes  his  Junior  Year  by  passing  a  final  Examina- 
tion, conducted  by  Archbishop  King's  Professor  and  his  Assistants, 
according  to  the  following  rules: — The  principal  Examination  is 
held  at  the  end  of  Trinity  Terra,  for  Students  who  have  regularly 
eomraenced  attendance  with  Michaelraas  Terra  ;  but  Supplemental 
Examinations  are  held  at  the  end  of  each  Term,  for  the  benefit  of 
Students  terminating  their  Course  at  other  times.  A  Supplemental 
Examination  is  also  held  at  the  beginning  of  Michaelmas  Term, 
before  the  Lectures  of  the  Senior  Class  begin.  In  rejecting  a  Can- 
didate, Archbishop  King's  Professor  determines  whether  he  may 
present  himself  again  at  the  Examination  at  the  end  of  the  next 
following  Terra,  or  whether  he  must  be  longer  kept  back. 

Students  are  required  to  give  notice  to  Archbishop  King's  Pro- 
fessor of  their  intention  to  present  themselves  (it  this  Exuminn- 
tion.  This  notice  must  be  given  one  week  before  the  day  oj 
Examination. 

The  Course  for  the  Examination  is  as  follows  : — 

1.  The  four  Gospels  and  Acts  of  the  Apostles  in  English. 
(Candidates  are  expected  to  be  acquainted  with  the  renderings  of 

the  Revised  Version  of  the  New  Testament.) 

2.  The  four  Gospels  and  the  Epistle  to  the  Romans  in  Greek. 

3.  Paley,  Evidences;  Butler,  Atialogy,  Parti  (omitting  Chap.  1), 

Part  II,  Chaps.  2  and  7  (part  i). 

4.  l\ir\^&tvi(ik,  JDiviue  Library  of  tht  Old  Testament;  Ilaniniond, 

Outlines  of  Textual  Criticism. 

h.  Articles  of  Religion,  I. -viii.  (English  and  Latin  texts);  Maclear, 
Introduction  to  ike  Creeds;  Liddon,  2'he  Divinity  of  o'.tr  Lord, 
Lectures  ii.,  iv.,  v.,  vi.,  vii. 

6.  The  portions  of  F.  J.  Foakes  Jackson's  History  of  the  Christian 

Church  appointed  for  the  Hilary  and  Trinity  Term  Exami- 
nations. 

7.  The  Prelections  of  Archbishop  King's  Professor. 

Failure  to  satisfy  the  Examiners  in  either  1  or  2  will 
disqualify  a  Candidate  from  obtaining  credit  for  this  Examina- 
tion. 

An  additional  Examination  for  Prizes  (attendance  on  whicb 
is  not  compulsory)  is  held  in  Michaelmas  Term.  See  below, 
*'  Prizes." 


I 


DIVINITY  scttoofc  207 

§  IV.  SkNIOK  OIVINITV  YEAkk 

The  Regius  Professor  receives  into  his  Class  those  Students  only 
whose  names  have  been  returned  to  hira  by  Archbishop  King's 
Professor  as  having  satisfied  all  the  requirements  of  the  Junior 
Year,  and  who  liave  passed  tlie  Degree  Examination,  or  are  Senior 
Sophisters,  and  qualified  to  present  themselves  at  the  Degree 
Examination  in  the  following  December,  or  who  do  not  intend  to 
pursue  the  Course  in  Arts,  but  were  permitted  by  Archbishop 
King's  Professor  to  enter  the  Junior  Class.  During  the  second  year, 
the  Students  are  recjuired  to  attend  tlie  Regius  Professor,  and  one 
of  his  Assistants ;  also  the  Lecturer  in  the  English  IMble,  if  they 
have  not  obtained  credit  for  this  course  previously  (see  p.  203). 
In  Michaelmas  and  Hilary  Terms  the  Professor  delivers  Pre- 
lections on  the  Dogmatic  Theology  of  the  Church  in  relation 
to  (^0  the  Church  of  Rome,  (i)  the  Eastern  Church,  (c)  Non- 
episcopal  Protestantism.  In  Trinity  Term  the  Professor  delivers 
Prelections  on  the  Philosophy  of  Religion. 

The  Professor  is  empowered  to  I'equire,  at  his  discretion,  from 
the  Students,  during  each  Term,  written  answers  to  questions  on 
the  subjects  of  his  Prelections. 

The  Regius  Professor  lectures  on  Tuesdays  and  Fridays,  and 
on  Wednesdays  at  his  discretion,  at  10  o'clock.  His  Assistants 
lecture  at  the  same  hour  on  Mondays  and  Thursdays. 

The  rules  as  to  the  numbers  of  Lectures  to  be  attended  are  the 
same  as  in  the  Junior  Year. 

SDBJECTS  OK  THE  ASSISTANTS'  LKCTUKES. 

Michaelmas  Term. — The  Tliirty-nine  Articles,  with  Coromentary, 

as  appointed  for  the  Final  Examination. 
Hilary  7V»-;«.— The  Book  of  Common  Prayer. 
I'rinity  Term. — The  portions  of  the  Greek  Testament  appointed  for 

the  Final  Examination. 

Each  Assistant  Lecturer  holds  an  examination  of  his  own  class 
at  the  end  of  each  Term. 

On  the  first  Lecture  day  of  each  Terra  Students  are  examined  in 
a  portion  of  the  Greek  Testartient.  (Candidates  are  expected  to 
be  acquainted  with  the  renderings  of  the  Revised  Version  of 
the  New  Testament.)  Students  who  fail  to  pass  a  satisfactory 
Examination  in  the  appointed  Course  of  Greek  on  the  first  day 
of  Term  are  required  to  attend  Tutorial  Lectures  in  Greek  as 
in  the  Junior  Divinity  year. 

On  the  first  Lecture  days  of  Hilary  andTrinity  Terms,  an  Exami- 
nation is  held  in  Kcclesiastical  History,  and  Articles  or  Liturgy,  in 
addition  to  the  portions  of  the  Greek  Testament  just  mentioned. 
It  is  necessary  to  pass  these  Term  Examinations  in  order  to 
qualify  for  the  Final  Examination. 

/ 


208  DIVINITY    SCHOOL. 


Subjects  of  the  Term  Examinations. 

Michaelmas  Term. — The  Greek  text  of  tlie  two  Epistles  to  Timothy 
and  the  Epistle  to  Titus. 

Hilary  Term. — The  Greek  text  of  the  First  Epistle  to  the 
Corinthians;  Robertson's  History  of  the  Christian  Church, 
Book  III.,  Book  IV.,  chaps,  i.,  ii.  ;  Bishop  Gibson's  Exposition 
of  Articles  vi.,  xxti.,  xxv.,  xxvu.,  xxviii. 

Trinity  Term. — The  Greek  text  of  the  Epistle  of  St.  James  and  of 
the  two  Epistles  of  St.  Peter. 

Hardwick's  History  of  the  Reformation:  — Introduction :  chap.  i. 
(Germany)  :  chap.  ii.  (Switzerland)  ;  chap,  iv.,  chap,  vi., 
cnap.viii.  (Roman  Communion,  English  Communion)  ;  Bishop 
T.  W.  Drury's  Row  we  got  our  Frayer  Book. 

Six  days,  not  ordinary  Lecture  days,  are  appointed  in  each  Term 
for  English  Composition ;  and  credit  iov  four  attendances  at  least 
is  necessary  for  keeping  the  Terra.  A  premium  of  £2  is  awarded 
by  the  Board  in  each  Term,  on  the  recommendation  of  the  Regius 
Professor,  to  the  Student  who  shall  have  sent  in  the  three  written 
Essays  of  highest  merit. 

The  Final  Examination  is  held  at  the  end  of  Trinity  Term,  for  all 
Students  who  have  attended  and  obtained  credit  for  the  three  pre- 
ceding Terras  of  the  Senior  Divinity  year,  and  have  complied  with 
the  foregoing  regulations.  A  similar  Examination  is  held  at  the 
end  of  the  Michaelmas  and  Hilary  Terms  for  Supplementalists  who 
have  completed  their  attendance  on  Divinity  Lectures  in  those 
Terms  respectivelj-.  A  Supplemental  Examination  is  held  also  at 
the  beginning  of  Michaelmas  Terra,  but  Students  corapeting  at  it 
are  liable  for  the  same  fees  as  they  pay  for  the  Examination  at 
the  end  of  the  Term. 

Students  are  required  to  (jive  notice  to  the  Reyius  Professor  of 
their  intention  to  present  tJi'emselves  at  the  Final  Divinity  Exami- 
nation, litis  notice  must  be  given  one  week  before  the  day  of 
Exainination. 

The  Examination  is  conducted  by  the  Regius  Professor  and  his 
Assistants :  and  the  Professor  of  Ecclesiastical  History  takes  part  in 
the  Examination  in  his  own  department.  Those  Students  who  have 
passed  the  Examination  are  arranged  in  three  classes,  according  to 
their  respective  answering.  Students  who  come  out  in  the  first 
class  receive  a  special  Honorary  Certificate,  in  addition  to  the 
usual  Divinity  Testimonium.  All  Candidates  must  take  up 
either  Hebreio  or  Latin.  They  may  take  up  both.  No  student 
will  be  placed  in  the  First  Class  who  has  not  passed  in  Hebrew. 


DIVINITY   SCHOOL.  209 

A  special  Certificate  shall  be  given  to  such  Students  as  shall 
have  answered  creditably  in  Hebrew  at  the  final  Examination,  and 
have  not  previously  obtained  the  Professor  of  Hebrew's  Certificate. 

The  Course  appointed  for  this  Examination  is  as  follows : — 

1.  Old  Testament. — Genesis-Esther. 

2.  New  Testament. — Romans-Revelation. 

(Candidates  are  expected  to  be  acquainted  with  the  renderings 
of  the  Revised  Version  of  the  New  Testament  in  all  the  books 
the  Greek  of  which  they  have  had  to  prepare  for  examination  in 
the  Divinity  School.) 

3.  Hebrew. — Hebrew  Grammar  ;  and  Genesis,  chaps,  i.  to  iv.,  and 

xii.  to  XT. 

Those  Students  who  have  passed  one  or  more  Examinations 
with  the  Professor  of  Hebrew  shall  not  be  examined  in  this 
Course,  but  shall  receive  such  marks  as  the  Professor  of  Hebrew 
shall  have  awarded  them. 

4.  Latin. — Rufinus,  In  Symboltun  Apostolorum  (ed.  E.  F.  Morison, 

Methuen). 

5.  Ecclesiastical  History. — The  portions  of  Robertson's  History  of  the 

Christian  Church  appointed  for  the  Hilary  Term  Examination, 
and  the  portions  of  Hardwick's  History  of  the  Reformation 
appointed  for  the  Trinity  Term  Examination ;  and  also  Stokes, 
Ireland  and  the  Celtic  Church  (6th  edition).  Lectures  i.-vii. 

6.  Liturgy  and  Church  Government. — The  Book  of  Common  Prayer 

with  Procter  and  Frere's  New  History  of  the  Book  of  Common 
Frayer  (1901). 

7.  Greek. — St.  Paul's  Second  Epistle  to  the  Corinthians,  and  the  Epistle 

to  the  Hebrews. 

8  &  9.    Articles  of  Religion  (with   Bishop  Gibson's  Exposition). — 
(8)  Articles  1. -XVI.     (9)  Articles  xvii.  to  end. 

10.  A  paper  of  questions  on  Old  Testament,  Job-Malachi,  with  special 
attention  to  the  Psalms. 

11.  A  paper  of  questions  on  the  public  Prelectiom\  ol  the  Regius 
Professor. 

Any  Student  who  has  kept  one  or  more  Terms  in  the  Senior 
.  Year,  may  obtain  permission  to  present  himself  at  the  Examina- 
tion at  the  close  of  any  Term  in  which  he  has  attended  Divinity 
Lectures,  in  not  less  than  three  of  the  subjects  above  numbered 
1,  2,  3, 4,  5,  and  6  ;  reserving  the  rest  for  his  Final  Examination. 

Any  Student  so  dividing  the  Final  Examination  must  complete 
it  within  seven  months  from  the  close  of  his  tliird  Term  ;  other- 
wise lie  will  lose  credit  for  the  marks  alreadv  obtained. 


210  DtVlNltT   SCfiOOL. 

When  attendance  npon  the  whole  Divinity  Course  has  beeti 
completed,  the  Divinitj-  Testimonium  is  given  in  the  f'^Uowing 
form  ; 

Testamur  A.  B.  per  biennium  sedulo  interfuisse  Praelectionibus  atqne 
Examinationibus  in  Sacra  Theologia  per  leges  Academicas  reqiiisitis. 

Prof essor  Reg .  in  Sacr.  Theol. 

Professor  in  Saer.  Theol. 

E  Coll.  SS.  Trin.  juxta  Dublin. 

§  V.  Additional  Lectures. 

In  addition  to  the  foregoing  Lectures,  which  are  compulsory 
upon  all  Divinity  Students,  instruction  is  also  given  upon  various 
subjects  in  connexion  with  the  Divinity  School.  These  Courses 
are  as  follow  :  —  I.Hebrew.  2.  Biblical  Greek.  3.  Ecclesiastical 
History.  4.  Irish.  5.  Pastoral  Theology.  6.  Reading  the  Liturgy. 
7.  Church  Music.  The  hours  of  instruction  in  these  depart- 
ments are  so  arranged  as  not  to  interfere  with  those  of  the 
Compulsory  Lectures.  Students  are  thus  enabled  to  complete 
their  attendance  upon  any  or  all  of  these  Courses  during  the 
period  of  their  ordinarj-  Divinity  studies. 

The  Professors  of  Biblical  Greek,  of  Ecclesiastical  History, 
and  of  Pastoral  Theology,  and  the  Wallace  Lecturer,  are 
authorized  to  grant  certiticates  of  attendance  on  their  respective 
Courses  to  Graduates  who  have  obtained  the  Divinity  Testi- 
monium, and  to  them  only. 

1.    HlCBllEW  LKCTURKS. 

1.  All  Students  in  Arts,  of  whatever  standing,  are  permitted  to 
attend  Hebrew  Lectures,  which  are  continued  for  three  years. 

2.  Students  who  have  completed  the  first  year  in  Hebrew  may 
obtain  from  the  Professor  a  Testimonium  to  that  efi'ect. 

3.  To  complete  the  Jirst  year,  the  Student  must  attend  three 
Terms  with  one  of  the  Assistants  to  the  Professor,  the  Course  being 
as  follows: — 

Hebrew   Grammar.       Genesis,  chaps,  i.  to  iv.,   and  xii.  to  xv.  ; 
1  Kings,  xvii.  to  xxii.  and  2  Kings,  i.  to  iii. 

He  must  also  pass  an  Examination  in  the  above  Course,  to 
be  held  at  the  end  of  the  third  Term.  Additional  credit  will  be 
allowed  at  the  Examination  to  Students  wiio  bring  up  also 
2  Kings  iv.  to  ix. 

4.  Students  who  have  completed  two  years  will  be  entitled  to  a 
Testimonium  to  that  effect. 

5.  To  enter  upon  the  second  year,  a  Student  must  have  kept  the 
three  Terms  of  the  Hrst  year,  and  passed  the  Examination. 

6.  To  complete  the  second  year,  the  Student  must  keep  three 
Terms,  by  attendance  on  the  Lectures  of  the  Professor,  and  also  on 


DIVINITY  SCHOOt..  211 

the  Lectures  of  one  of  the  Assistants,  the  Coufse  lectured  on  by  the 
Assistants  being  as  follows  : — 
Psalms  xlii.  to  Ixxii. 
He  must  also  pass  an  Examination  in  this  portion  of  the  Book  of 
Psalms,  to  be  held  at  the  end  of  the  third  Term. 

7 .  To  enter  upon  the  third  year,  the  Student  must  have  kept  the 
two  former  years,  and  passed  theExaminations;  and  to  complete  the 
year,  he  must  attend  the  Professor's  Lectures  for  three  Term-s, 
and  pass  an  Examination  at  the  end  of  the  third  Term,  the  Course 
being  as  follows : — 

Genesis,  xlix.;  Deuteronomy,  xxxiii.  ;  Ji-dges,  v.  ;  Job,  i.  to  xi., 
and  xxxviii.  to  xli.  ;   Esther  and  Daniel. 

8.  Any  Sliident  who  shall  have  passed  a  qualifying  Examina- 
tion to  the  satisfaction  of  the  Professor,  shall  be  permitted  at  once 
to  join  the  Middle  or  Senior  Class  at  Hebrew  Lectures. 

9.  Students  who  have  completed  three  years  will  he  entitled  to 
a  Special  Testimonium  to  that  effect. 

10.  Prizes  are  given  to  the  best  answerers  at  the  Annual  Exami- 
nations. No  Student  may  compete  for  the  Prize  of  any  Class 
who  has  not  kept  the  three  Terms  of  that  Class  immediately 
preceding  the  Examination,  and  no  student  may  obtain  a  Prize 
in  any  Class  twice.  The  names  of  all  Students  who  pass  the 
Examinations  are  placed  in  the  order  of  merit,  and  published  by 
the  Professor. 

11.  Prizes  in  Aramaic  (Chaldee)  atnl  Syriac. — At  the  end  of 
Trinity  Term,  in  each  year.  Premiums  will  bo  given  in  the 
Syriac  and  Chaldee  languages,  at  the  Examination  for  the 
Hebrew  Prizes,  on  the  following  conditions  : — 

1.  Candidates  must  have  passed  the  ordinary  Hebrew  Examination  of 
the  first  year. 

2.  They  must  answer  in  the  following  Course : 

Chaldee  and  Syriac  Grammars. 

St.  Mark's   Gospel,  ix-xvi,  and   St.  Paul's  First  Epistle  to 

Timothy,  in  the  I'eshitta  Version. 
The  Book  of  Daniel,  ii,  iii,  v,  vi. 

12.  Candidates  for  the  Prizes  in  Hebrew  or  Chaldee  and 
Syriac  must,  in  Hilary  Term,  on  or  before  the  day  appointed  in 
the  Calendar  (see  Almanac),  notify  the  Senior  Lecturer. 

2.   BIBLICAL  GKKKK. 

The  Professor  of  Biblical  Greek  delivers  a  Course  of  public  general 
Prelectionsduring  twoof  thetiiree  Academical  Terms  of  each  year. 

He  also  delivers  special  Lectures  on  particular  books  of  the  LXX . 
or  the  New  Testament  to  such  Students  as  may  desire  to  attend 
them.  The  subjects  and  days  of  Lecture  are  announced  at  the 
beginning  of  each  Term. 

The  Examination  for  Prizes  is  held  in  Trinity  Term.  For  the 
regulations  .and  subjects,  see  p.  219. 


212  DIVINITY   SCHOOL. 


3.    ECCLESIASTICAL   HISTOUY. 

The  Professor  of  Ecclesiastical  History  delivers  a  Course  of  public 
general  Prelections  during  two  of  the  three  Academical  Terms  of 
each  year.  The  Course  of  Lectures  is  intended  to  extend  over  two 
years. 

An  Examination  for  Prizes  is  held  in  Trinity  Term.  For 
the  regulations  and  subjects,  see  p.  219. 

4.    IRISH. 

All  Students  can  attend  the  lectures  of  the  Professor  of  Irish. 
For  the  regulations  and  Prizes  see  under  "  Irish." 

5.    PASTORAL  THEOLOGY. 

The  Professor  of  Pastoral  Theology  delivers  a  Course  of  Pre- 
lections each  Term.  The  Lectures  are  delivered  on  Saturdays 
at  9.30  a.m.,  in  the  Regent  House.  A  Student  cannot  obtain 
credit  for  having  kept  a  Term  if  he  shall  have  absented  himself 
more  than  once. 

Certidcates  of  attendance  on  this  Course  can  be  given  only  to 
those  who  have  obtained  the  Divinity  Testimonium. 

The  Professor  holds  an  Examination  at  the  close  of  Trinity 
Terra,  and  a  Prize  of  £2  is  presented  to  the  best  answerer. 

It  is  part  of  his  dutj-  to  assist  in  the  reading  and  criticism  of 
tlie  Sermons  of  Students  in  Divinity. 

6.    READING  THE  LITURGY. 

The  Wallace  Divinity  Lecturer  gives  instructions  once  a  week 
in  voice-production  and  in  reading. 

These  Lectures  are  attended  by  members  of  the  Senior  Divinity 
Class,  and  such  members  of  the  Junior  Class  as  Archbishop 
King's  Professor  shall  direct  to  attend. 

Attendance  is  compulsory  in  ease  of  such  Students  as  the 
Professors  shall  direct  to  join  it. 

In  order  to  obtain  a  Certitieate — which  can  be  given  only  to 
those  who  have  obtained  the  Divinity  Testimonium — Students 
must  attend  Lectures  in  Michaelmas  or  Hilary,  and  Trinity  Terms. 

A  Student  cannot  obtain  credit  for  having  kept  a  Term  if  he 
shall  have  absented  himself  more  than  once.  The  Downes'  Prizes 
for  "  Reading  the  Liturgy"  are  awarded  in  Trinity  Term. 

7.    CHURCU    MUSIC. 

Instruction  is  given  in  Church  Music  on  two  days  in  the  week 
iu  the  College  Chapel  by  the  College  Organist.  Students  getting 
credit  for  tiiree  terms  (of  which  Trinity  Term  must  be  one)  are 
entitled  to  certificates  to  that  effect. 


I 


niviNiir  SCHOOL.  213 

§  VI.  Phizes. 

THKOLOGICAL    EXHIBITIONS. 

For  the  further  promotion  of  Theological  learning,  the  Board 
of  Trinity  College,  with  the  consent  of  the  Visitors,  on  the 
18th  of  December,  185S,  founded  "Theological  Exhibitions," 
in  place  of  the  Prizes  formerly  known  as  the  "Divinity  Professor's 
Premiums."  , 

The  Examination  for  these  Exhibitions  is  held  each  year  at  the 
end  of  Hilary  Term,  on  the  days  stated  in  the  Almanac. 

To  the  best  answerers  at  this  Examination  two  Exhibitions  are 
given,  one  of  £60,  and  one  of  £40  per  annum,  provided  there 
be  sufficient  merit.  Each  of  these  Exhibitions  is  tenable  for  a 
period  not  exceeding  three  years. 

Candidates  for  these  Exhibitions  must  not  be  of  more  than  one 
year's  standing  as  M.A.,  reckoned  from  the  Michaelmas  Examina- 
tion of  the  Senior  Freshman  year;  they  must  have  obtained  the 
Divinity  Testimonium  ;  and  they  must  present  themselves  at  the 
Examination  immediately  subsequent  to  the  Term  in  which  they 
have  completed  their  Divinity  Lectures.  No  person  can  offer 
himself  as  a  Candidate  a  second  time. 

Candidates  for  these  Exhibitions  whose  names  have  gone  off  the 
College  Books,  are  permitted  to  replace  them  on  payment  of  the 
Junior  Bursar's  fee  of  los. 

The  following  is  the  Course  appointed  for  December,  1922, 
and  March  and  June,  1923 : — 


The  Old  Testament — 

[a)  Daniel  (both  Greek  versions,   with  apocryphal  additions)  and 
Esther  in  the  Septimj^int. 

ComineiUaiies  lecomniended  :    Apocryplml  additions :     The 
Apocrypha   of  the   Old  Testament,   vol.   i  (ed.   Charles)  ; 
Daniel :  Driver  (^..-amb.  Bible) ;  Charles  (Ceniiiry  Bible); 
Esther:  I'aton  (Internat.  Crit.  Coiiim.). 
Swete,   Inlrodnction  to  the   Old   Testament  in   Greek'.  Part  I, 
Chaps.  1,  2,  3,  5  ;  Part  II,  Chaps.  4,  5  ;  Part  III,  Chaps. 
2,  4,  5,  6. 
Thackeray,  Grammarofthe  Old  Testament  in  Greek  will  be  found 
useful. 

(h)  The  Historical  and  Prophetical  Books  from  the  Accession  of 
Uzziah  to  tlie  close  of  the  Old  Testament. 
The  following  works  will  he  found  useful :  — 

Foakes  Jackson,  Biblical  History  oftheHebretvs,  chaps.  10-end. 
Sayce,  The  Higher  Criticism  and  the  Monuments,  chaps.  9-end. 
Charles,  Eschatology :  Hebrew,  Jewish,  and  Christian  (1913),  to 

the  2nd  century  B.C.  inclusive. 
Ottley,  R.  L.,  The  Hebrew  Prophets. 


214  DIVINITY   SCHOOL. 

II. 
Hebreiv. — Job,  i.-xi.,  xxxviii.-xli. 
Commentary  recommended — G.  H.  Gray,  Inieiftational  Crii.  Conim. 
A  passage  will  be  set  from  the  English  Bible  for  retranslation  into  Hebrew. 

III. 
The  New  Testament  in  Greek.  Special  Subject — The  Second  Epistle  to  the 

Corinthians . 
Editions  recommended — A.  Plumnier  {Inteniaiional  Critical  Commentary), 

and  J.  H.  Bernard  (Expositor's  Greek  Testament). 
Moifatt,  Introduction  to  the  Literature  of  the  Netv  Testamaut,  Prolego- 
mena (pp.  1-58),  and  pp.  116-130. 
Article  in  Hastings'  Dictionary  of  the  Bible  :  Corinthians,  Second  Epistle 

to  the. 
M'Neile,  St.  Faul,  His  Life,  Letters,  and  Christian  Doctrine,  pp.  1-120; 

265-307. 
Salmon,  Introduction  to  the Kew  Testament.  Lect'.iresiv.,  v.,  vi.,  vii.,x.\. 
Westcott  and  Hort,  The  New  Testament  in  Greek — The  Inirodiiciioii. 

and  so  much  of  the  Appendix  as  relates  lo  the  Second  Epistle  to  the 

Corinthians. 
Kenvon,  Handbook  to   the   Textual   Criticism  of  the   New    Testament 

■(2nd  ed.). 
J.  Armitage  Robinson,  The  Study  of  the  Gospels. 

IV. 
Hooker,  Ecclesiastical  Polity,  Book  5. 

The  Doctrinal  Decrees  of  tiie  Council  of  Treat,  viz.  those  passed  in 
Sessions  3,  4,  6,  6,  13,  H,  21,  22,  23,  24,  25,  omitting  the  DecrecE 
on  Reformation. 
Accessible  in  the   Tauchnitz  edition  of  tlie  Cauones,  Jic.  (Leipzig)  ;  also  in  Deii- 
iiin!;er's  Enchiridion  (Staiil's  euition). 

Hardwick,  History  of  the  Articles. 

Salmon,   Infallibility   of  the  Church,  Lectures   ii.,  iii.,  iv.,  vi.,  xi., 

xii.,  xiii.,  xiv.,  xviii.-xxiii. 
Duchesne,  Christian  Worship  :   its  Oriain  and  Evolution,  omitting  the 

Appendices  (2nd  or  3rd  English  edition). 
Stone,  A  History  of  the  Doctrine  of  the  Eucharist. 
R.  W.  Dale,  The  Atonement. 

V. 

(a)  The  general  fuels  of  Church  History  up  to  700  a.d. 

(b)  Eusebius,  Ecclesiastical  History  imd  The  Martyrs  of  Talestine. 
{c)  Special  course :  Eusebius,  H.  E.,  Books  v.-vii. 

Lawlor,  Eusebiana,  Essays  ii.,  iii.,  vi. 
Benson,  Cyprian. 

Smith    and   Wace,    Dictionary   of  Christian   Biography — Articles 
Tertullianus  and  Origenes.    ' 

VI. 
Latin — Augustine,  Be  Doctrin a  Christiana  (Bruder,  in  Tauchnitz  ed.). 
Greek — Ignatius,  Epistles.     Ed.  Lightfoot.  (Camb.  Univ.  Press). 

Smith  and  Wace,  Dictionary  of  Christian  Biography — Article 
Auguslinus,  Aurelius  ;  Lightfoot,  Apostolic  Fathers,  ed.  2,  Part  ii., 
Vol.  i.  (ed.  1,  Vol.  ii.,  Sect.  1),  pp.  1-49. 


DIVINITY  SCHOOL.  215 

VII. 
[For  Candidates  who  do  not  hold  the  Divinity  Testimonium ;  seep.  11.] 
The     J'^xjimiiuition     for     TlieoloKical     Exhibitions    mIU     be     held 
March  6,  7,  8. 

Tlie  Exaniiniitions  for  B.D.  Degree  will  be  held  December  5,  6,  7,  8  ; 
March  6,  7,  8,  9  ;  June  5,  6,  7,  8. 

The  following  will  be,  on  each  occasion,  tho  order  of  Exarai- 
uation : — 

First  Day,     10  a.m.,  Division  VI.  ;  2  p.m..  Division  II. 

Second  Lay,  10  a.m.,  Division  I. ;      2  p.m.,  Division  III. 

Third  Bay,    10  a.m.,  Division  V.  ;     2  p.m.,  Division  IV. 

Fourth  I'ay,  10  a.m.,  Division  VII. 

In  December,    1923,    the    following   will   be    substituted: — In   i. 

{a)  Job,  i.-xxxi.  in  the  Septuagint ;  [b)  Job,  Pmlms,  Proverbs,  Eccle- 

siiistes.   Song  of  Solomon.  U'tsdom,  Ecclesiaslicm  ;  in  ii.,  Jfenteronpmi/, 

xxxi.-xxxiv.,    Joshua,   i.-x.,    xiv.,    xvii.,    xx.,    xxii.-xxiv.  ;    in   in, 

Ephesiiins,   Philippians,    Colossians.   Philemon;    in    v..    Special  Course, 

iiiisebiiis,   H,  E.,  Books  viii.-x.  ;  Law-lor,  Eusebiaua,  Essays  iii.— vi.  ; 

in  VI.,  Augustine,  Confessions,  i.-vi.  ;  Origan,  Contra  Celsum,  iii,,  iv. — 

in    each    case  Mith    correspoi\din':   changes    in    the   collateral   books. 

Other  chanires  may  also  be  made.     The  whole  Course  for  December, 

1923-June,    1924,  will    be    finally  arranged  and  issued   in  or  before 

Trinity  Term,  1923. 

.UtCHBISHOP    king's    DIVINITY    PUIZES. 

These  Prizes  were  founded  by  tlie  i5oard  in  the  year  1836.  They 
are  called  Arclibishop  King's  Divinity  Prizes,  because  they  are  given 
at  an  annual  Examination  held  by  Archbishop  King's  Divinity 
Professor. 

This  Examination  is  held  in  the  beginning  of  Michaelmas 
Term ;  and  such  Students  only  can  be  Candidates  for  the  Prizes 
as  are  selected  by  the  E.\aminers  at  the  general  Divinity  Exami- 
nation, at  the  end  of  Trinity  or  beginning  of  Michaelmas  Term. 

Tlie  Course  for  the  Examination  is  as  follows : — 

1 .  The  four  Gospels  and  Acts  of  the  Apostles,  in  English. 

2.  The  four  Gosnols,  the  Acts  of  the  Apostles,  and  the  Epistles  to  the 
llomans,  Galatians,  and  Philippians,  in  Greek.  Special  subject :  for 
1922,  The  Epistles  u  tlie  Galatians  and  Philippians;  and  for  1923, 
The  Gospel  according  lo  St.  Luke. 

3.  Butler's  Analogy. 

4.  Paley's  Evidences  and  Hora  Paulina. 

').  Maclear's  Introduction  to  the  Creeds,  and  Swete's  The  Apostles^ 
Greed. 

6.  Sanday  on  Inspiration,  Lectures  i.,  ii.,  iii.,  vi,,  vii,,  viii. 

7.  Liddon  on  The  Divinity  of  our  Lord,  and  Kirkpatrick's  Divine 
Library  of  the  Old  Testament. 

5.  F.  J.  Foakes  Jackson's  History  of  the  Christian  Church,  A.n. 
64-590. 

9.  The  Prelections  of  Archbishop  King's  Professor. 


216  ))IVlNITr   SCHOOL. 

Two  Prizes,  one  of  £12  and  the  other  of  £8,  are  given  to  the  best 
answerers  (if  sufficient  merit  be  shown  by  the  Candidates) :  and 
Certificates  to  such  as  answer  sufficiently. 

The '  Certificate  cannot  be  given  to  any  Student  until  he  has 
completed  his  whole  Divinity  Course,  and  obtained  the  Divinity 
Testimonium. 

KISHOP    FORSTKk's  DIVINITY   FKEMIUMfe. 

In  the  year  1738,  the  sum  of  £200  was  given  to  the  College  by 
the  Right  Rev.  Nicholas  Forster,  D.D.,  Lord  Bishop  of  Raphoe, 
sometime  Senior  Fellow  of  Trinity  College,  Dublin,  on  condition 
that  it  should  be  applied  to  the  purpose  of  encouraging  the  study 
of  Theology,  in  connexion  with  the  Lectures  of  Archbishop  King's 
Professor  of  Divinity.  When  the  office  of  Archbishop  King's 
Professor  was  placed  on  a  new  foundation,  in  the  year  1836,  the 
endowment  of  Bishop  Forster  was  included  in  the  Prizes  then 
instituted  by  the  Board,  for  the  Junior  Divinity  Class.  The  fund, 
along  with  the  unappropriated  balance  of  interest,  produces 
annually  about  £17,  and  this  annual  interest  is  distributed 
in  Premiums  to  the  two  best  answerers  in  the  subjects  of  the 
Lectures  of  Archbishop  King's  Professor,  at  the  Examination  for 
Archbishop  King's  Divinity  Prizes,  if  sufficient  merit  be  shown 
by  the  Candidates. 

CARSON    BIBLICAL    PRIZE. 

In  Michaelmas  Term,  1891,  the  Rev.  Joseph  Carson,  D.D.,  Vice- 
Provost,  gave  to  the  Provost  and  Senior  Fellows  of  Trinity 
College  the  sum  of  £500,  to  found  a  Prize  for  the  purpose  of 
promoting  among  Divinity  Students  an  accurate  knowledge  of  the 
text  of  the  English  Bible.  The  Examination  for  the  Prize  is 
under  the  control  and  management  of  Archbishop  King's  Professor 
of  Divinity,  subject  to  such  rules  and  regulations  as  the  Provost 
and  Senior  Fellows  may  from  time  to  time  prescribe. 

The  Examination  is  held  in  the  Hilary  Term  of  each  year. 
The  Prize  is  open  to  all  Students  in  the  Junior  Divinity  Class, 
and  the  Examination,  which  is  public,  is  conducted  viva  voce. 
No  Student  can  compete  for  the  Prize  a  second  time. 

The  fund  produces  annually  about  £15. 

For  the  purpose  of  the  Examination,  the  subject  is  divided  into 
four  parts,  as  follows  : — 

I.  Pentateuch,  and  Historical  Books. 

II.  Job  to  Malachi. 

III.  Gospels,  and  Acts  of  the  Apostles. 

IV.  Epistles,  and  Revelation. 

In  each  year,  particular  books  of  the  above  Course  will  be  pre- 
scribed for  special  Examination. 

The  hours  of  Examination  are  from  9.30  to  12.30,  and  from 
2  to  o. 


Divijsnr  SCHOOL.  217 

Special  Books  appointed : — 

For  1923 — Old  Testament. — Jeremiah. 

New  Testament. — The  Acts  of  the  Apostles. 

TOPLADr   MEMORIAL   SCRIPTURE   PRIZES. 

Rev.  William  Batley,  M,A.,  presented  £210  to  the  Board  in 
Trinity  Term,  1906,  to  form  an  endowment  for  a  Prize  in 
memory  of  Rev.  Augustus  Montague  Toplady,  Hymn -writer  and 
Theologian. 

The  Prizes  are  given  for  knowledge  of  Holy  Scripture  (as 
distinct  from  general  theological  knowledge). 

No  book  except  the  Bible  (or  Greek  Testament)  may  be  given 
as  a  Prize  in  connexion  with  this  endowment  which  contains,  in 
the  opinion  of  those  appointed  to  control  the  selection  of  the  prize 
books,  direct  theological  teaching. 

The  Prize,  amounting  to  about  £6  os.,  is  awarded  annually  to 
the  Candidate  next  in  merit  to  the  Prizeman  at  the  examination 
for  the  Carson  Biblical  Prize. 

WETR   PKIZK   IN    HOLT   SCKIPTTrEE. 

In  1921  the  College  received  £100,  bequeathed  by  the  Rev. 
Edward  Henry  Weir,  for  the  purpose  of  establishing  a  Prize  in 
the  Divinity  School,  to  be  called  the  Weir  Prize. 

This  Prize  is  awarded  to  the  Student  who  shall  have  shown 
most  merit  in  the  written  examination  in  Holy  Scripture  at  the 
(Jeneral  Examination  of  the  Junior  Class  held  in  Trinity  Term. 

The  Student  who  shall  have  obtained  the  Carson  or  tlie  Toplady 
Prize  shall  not  be  eligible  for  the  Weir  Prize. 

It  shall  be  in  the  power  of  the  Divinity  School  Council,  at  the 
request  of  the  two  Divinity  Professors,  to  vary  the  foregoing 
regulations  governing  the  competition  of  the  Prize  as  circum- 
stances may  require. 

The  annual  value  of  the  Prize  is  about  £5. 

D0WNK8   UIVINITY    PKEMIUM6. 

In  the  year  1797,  these  Premiums  were  established  out  of  a  fund 
bequeathed  to  the  College  for  the  purpose,  by  the  Rev.  Dr.  Downes, 
of  Waterford.  The  fund  produces  annually  about  £39.  The 
regulations  concerning  these  Prizes  (which  are  open  to  all  Students 
in  Divinity  during  the  two  terms  antecedent  to  that  in  which  the 
examinations  are  held)  are  as  follows: — 

1.  Written  Compositioti. — The  Examiners  are  the  Regius 
Professor  of  Divinity,  Archbishop  King's  Professor  of  Divinity, 
and  the  Professor  of  Oratory.  The  subject  is  announced  in  the 
last  week  of  Hilary  Term  by  Archbishop  King's  Professor.  On 
an  appointed  day  in  Trinity  Term  the  Candidates  deliver  dis- 
courses on  the  proposed  subject  without  hesitation,  no  discourse 
to  exceed  one  quarter  of  an  hour  in  delivery.  A  Premium  of 
about  £12  is  adjudged  to  the  best,  and  one  of  about  £8  to  the 

L 


218  DIVINITY   SCHOOL. 

next  best,  or  such  inferior  Premiums  as  they  shall  appear  to 
merit,  regard  being  had  as  well  to  the  manner  of  pronouncing 
such  discourses  as  to  the  matter  of  them.  No  Candidate  can 
compete  oftener  than  three  times. 

2.  Oratory. — Prizes  of  about  £6  and  £4  are  placed  at  the 
disposal  of  the  Professor  of  Pastoral  Theology  each  Trinity  Term, 
to  be  awarded  at  his  discretion  to  those  Students  who  have 
profited  most  by  his  instructions  in  preaching  and  in  the  delivery 
of  sermons.    Ko  Candidate  can  obtain  either  Prize  a  second  time, 

3.  Readifig  the  Liturgy, — Prizes  of  about  £5  and  £2  are  placed 
at  the  disposal  of  the  Wallace  Lecturer  each  Trinity  Term  to  be 
awarded  at  his  discretion  to  those  Students  who  have  proHted 
most  by  his  instructions.  No  Candidate  can  obtain  either  Prizo 
a  second  time. 

The  following  is  an  extract  from  the  will  of  Dr.  Downes, 
respecting  the  disposal  of  unappropriated  Premiums: — 

"And  whereas  it  may  from  time  to  time  so  happen  thatCandidates 
meriting  such  Premiums  may  not  appear,  in  s\ich  case,  the  savings  in 
each  year  shall  go  to  the  augmentation  of  the  fund,  and  be  laid  out, 
from  time  to  time,  in  the  purchase  of  Government  securities,  the 
interest  thereof  to  be  added  to  the  fund  for  the  increase  of  said 
Premiums  in  future." 

Dr.  Downes  also  founded  certain  Exhibitions,  to  be  held  by 
Students  in  Divinity.  The  conditions  on  which  these  Exhibi- 
tions are  awarded  will  be  found  under  the  title  "'  Downes 
Exhibitions." 

CHURCH    FOHMULARIES   PRIZE. 

An  Annual  Prize  of  £10  was  founded  in  the  year  1868,  by  the 
Right  Hon.  Robert  R.  Warren,  late  JNI.P.  for  the  University,  in 
order  to  encourage  the  study  of  the  Creeds  and  Articles  of  the 
Church.  This  Prize  is  given  to  the  best  answerer  in  the  Church 
Formularies  at  the  Final  Divinity  Examination  held  by  the 
Regius  Professor  in  Trinity  Term,  provided  sufficient  general 
merit  be  shown. 

o'regan  memouial  prize. 

An  Annual  Prize  of  £5  is  awarded  to  the  best  answerer  at  the 
Final  Divinity  Examination. 

It  was  founded  in  1918  by  the  son  of  the  Ven.  John  O'Regan, 
Archdeacon  of  Kildare  (Sch.  1841),  to  perpetuate  the  memory  of 
his  father,  who  obtained  full  marks  from  each  of  the  nine  examiners 
at  the  Final  Divinity  Kxamination  in  184ti. 

A  memoir  of  Archdeacon  O'Regan,  by  his  son,  is  also  presented 
to  the  winner. 

RYAN  prize. 

In  1812.  a  debenture  of  £100  was  granted  to  Trinity  College  by 
Edward  Ryan,  Esq.,  for  the  purpose  of  founding  a  Prize. 


DIVINITT   SCHOOL.  219 

At  the  end  of  Trinity  Term  this  Prize  is  awarded  by  Archbishop 
King's  Professor  to  that  member  of  the  Junior  Divinity  Class 
(being  under  M.A.  standing)  who  shall  have  been  most  diligent 
in  attendance  at  Composition  Lectures.  The  quality  of  the  Essays 
written  during  the  year  will  he  taken  into  consideration. 

The  Fund  invested  produces  annually  about  £3.  The  Prize 
is  payable  in  November  by  the  Bursar. 

PRIZKS   IN   BIBLICAL   GREEK. 

These  Prizes  were  founded  by  the  Board  in  the  year  1840.  A  sum 
of  £15  is  placed  at  the  disposal  of  the  Professor  of  Biblical  Greek, 
to  be  given  in  Prizes  to  the  best  answerers  at  an  Annual  Exami- 
nation, which  is  held  in  Trinity  Term,  on  a  day  to  be  fixed  by 
the  Professor.  Candidates  must  be  at  least  of  Junior  Sophister 
standing,  and  no  candidate  can  olitain  a  Prize  more  than  once. 
Course  for  1923.— Daniel  and  Esther. 

Revelation. 

Swete:    Introduction  to  the  Old   Testament  in 
Greek,  chaps.  1  to  3. 

The  Lectures  of  the  Professor. 

PHIZES   IN    ECCLESIASTICAL   HISTOUY. 

These  Prizes  were  founded  by  the  Board  in  the  year  1851.  They 
consist  of  two  Premiums,  one  of  £10,  the  other  of  £5,  given  at  an 
Annual  Examination,  held  by  the  Professor  of  Ecclesiastical 
History.  The  Examination  is  held  in  Trinity  Term,  on  a  day 
to  be  fixed  by  the  Professor,  and  is  open  to  such  Students  as 
shall  have  attended  the  Professor's  Lectures  during  two  Terms 
of  the  actual  year  in  which  they  present  themselves  as  Candi- 
dates.    No  candidate  can  obtain  a  Prize  more  than  once. 

Course  for  1922. 
Robertson's  History  of  the  Christian  Church,  a.d.  64-fi90. 
Eusebius'  Ecclesiastical  History. 
The  Professor's  Lectures. 

ROHEUT   KINO    MEMORIAL    PRIZE    IN    ECCLESIASTICAL    HISTORY. 

On  June  28,  1902,  the  friends  of  the  late  Kev.  Robert  King, 
B.A.  (Sch.,  1835),  })resented  the  sum  of  £112  to  the  Board  for 
the  purpose  of  founding  a  Prize  in  memory  of  him.  The  follow- 
ing conditions  were  suggested  by  the  subscribers,  and  agreed  to 
by  the  Board  :  — 

1.  That  the  money  be  invested,  and  the  interest  be  awarded  as  a  Prize 
to  the  best  answerer  in  Ecclesiastical  History  at  the  Final  Divinity 
Examination  held  in  Trinity  Term,  provided  sufficient  merit  is  shown. 

2.  That  the  Prize  be  known  as  the  "  Robert  King  Memorial  Prize  in 
Ecclesiastical  History.'* 

;5.  That,  if  in  any  year  sufficient  merit  is  not  shown,  the  interest  for 
that  year  be  added  to  the  capital. 
The  fund  invested  produces  annually  about  £4. 

l2  . 


220  DIVINITY    SCHOOL. 

BEDELL   SCHOLAKSHIPg. 

The  Committee  of  the  Irish  Society,  with  the  sanction  of  the 
Provost  and  Senior  Fellows  of  Trinity  College,  founded  in  1845 
two  Scholarships  in  the  University,  denominated  "The  Bedell 
Scholarships,"  and  placed  them  under  the  superintendence  of 
Trustees,  named  by  the  founders. 

The  Scholarships  are  designed  for  such  Students  only  as  give 
reasonable  hope  that  they  will  be  competent  on  their  ordination  to 
preach  in  the  Irish  Language.  One  Scholar  is  elected  whenever  a 
vacancy  takes  place. 

The  regulations  are  as  follow : — 

1.  The  value  of  each  Scholarship  shall  be  £20  per  annum,  payable  half 
yearly,  in  the  last  weeks  of  October  and  April. 

2.  An  Examination  of  Candidates  shall  be  held  annually,  as  soon  after 
the  Trinity  Term  Examination  as  possible,  on  a  date  to  be  fixed  by  the 
Trustees,  in  conjunction  with  the  Professor  of  Irish. 

3.  The  Scholarships  shall  be  open  to  Students  of  any  standing  in  the 
University,  unless  they  be  Irish  Sizars  ;  and  shall  be  tenable  by  them 
for  four  years,  if  they  shall  keep  their  names  so  long  on  the  College 
Books,  and  have  not  been  admitted  to  Holy  Orders. 

4.  They  shallbe  required  to  reside  in  or  near  Dublin,  andtoattend  the 
Lectures  of  the  Professor  of  Irish  (if  notspecially  exempted  by  the  Trus- 
tees of  this  fund),  and  to  attend  also  Divinity  Lectures,  when  of  sufficient 
standing. 

5.  They  shall  be  required  to  pass  an  Annual  Examination,  at  the  com 
mencement  of  Michaelmas  Term,  in  the  Irish  Language.  The  subjects 
of  this  Examination  to  be  fixed  by  the  Trustees,  in  conjunction  with  the 
Professor  of  Irish. 

6.  On  the  day  of  payment  in  April,  the  Scholars  shall  produce  to  the 
Trustees,  or  their  Secretary,  a  certificate  from  the  Professor  of  Irish,  t  hat 
they  have  satisfactorily  passed  the  above-mentioned  Annual  Examination 
in  Irish;  they  shall  also  obtainfrom  their  College  Tutors, and  atthesame 
time  present  to  the  Trustees,  or  their  Secretary,  a  certificateof  the  judg- 
ments and  Honors,  if  any,  which  were  given  to  them  at  the  Term,  Cate-ji 
chetical,  and  Divinity  Examinations  during  the  previous  year.  Ij 

7.  On  failure  of  any  of  these  conditions,  the  payment  then  due  shallbe 
withheld;  and  on  a  second  failure,  the  Scholarship  shall  become  void. 

8.  The  names  of  the  Candidates,  and  their  qualifications,  shall  be  re- 
turned, after  the  Examination,  to  the  Trustees,  in  whom  the  election 
shall  be  vested. 


At  the  Examination  for  the  Bedell  Scholarship ,  the  best  answere 
of  the  unsuccessful  Candidates,  if  recommended  by  the  Professor  of 
Irish,  obtains  a  prize  of  £10. 


> 


II 


DIVlNITr   SCHOOL. 


221 


The  following  subjects  have  been  appointed  for  the  Examina- 
tion for  the  Bedell  Scholarship: — 

1.  Irish  Grammar. 

2.  Translation  of  the  Gospels  from  Irish  into  English,  and  vice  vend- 

i.  The  Lord's  Prayer,  Creed,  and  Ten  Commandments,  in  Irish,  by 
heart :  the  Creed  proved  from  Holy  Scripture. 

4.  The  Thirty-nine  Articles  proved  from  Holy  Scripture. 

5.  Composition. 

ANNUAL    EXAMINATIONS. 


First  Tear. 
Translation  of  Pentateuch. 
Irish    Prayer    Book,  Morning 

Prayer. 
Church  Catechism  in  Irish  by 

heart  with  Scripture  Proofs. 
Irish  Composition. 

Second  Year. 

Translation  of  Epistles. 

Irish  Prayer  Book,  Evening 
Service  and   Litany. 

Irish  Composition. 

Declamation  in  Irish  (Extem- 
pore). 


Third  Year. 

1.  Historical  Books  of  Irish  Bible. 

2.  Irish  Prayer  Book.  Occasional 
Prayers,  &c.,  Holy  Com- 
munion, and  Baiitismal  Office. 

3.  Irish  Composition. 

4.  Declamation  in  Irish. 

Fourth  Year. 

1.  Reniaitiing  Booksof  Irish  Bible. 

2.  Irish  Prayer  Book,  Marriage 
and  Burial  Offices  and  Paalms. 

3.  Irish  Composition. 

4.  Declamation  in  Irish. 


KYLE  IRISH  PKIZE. 

A  Prize  for  the  encoiirageraentof  the  Study  of  the  Irish  Language 
was  founded  in  the  University  in  1852,  in  commemoration  of  the 
Sight  Rev.  Samuel  Kyle,  Bishop  of  Cork,  Cloyne,  and  Ross,  and 
formerly  Provost  of  Trinity  College.  The  following  are  the  Reso- 
lutions entered  into  by  the  Trustees  of  the  Fund,  and  agreed  to  by 
the  Provost  and  Senior  Fellows: — 

1.  That  the  Funds  collected  shall  be  invested  in  Government  securi- 
ties, or  Bank  Stock,  in  the  joint  names  of  the  Provost  and  Senior  Fellows 
of  Trinity  College,  the  Professor  of  Irish,  and  the  Dean  and  .Archdeacon 
of  Cork,  all  for  the  time  being. 

2.  That  the  Endowment  shall  consist  of  one  year's  interest  of  the 
principal  sum  so  invested. 

3.  The  Kyle  Irish  Prize  is  to  be  competed  for  by  Candidates  in 
priority  as  follows: — (1)  Diocese  of  Cork,  Cloyne,  and  Eoss,  (2)  Limerick, 
Ardfert,  and  Aghadoe :  (3)  Killaloe,  Kilfenora,  Clonfert,  and  Kilniat- 
duagh  :  (4)  Tuam,  Killala,  and  Achonry  :  (5)  Raphoe.  Failing  deserv- 
ing Can(iidates  from  these  Dioceses,  Candidates  are  to  be  accepted  from 
any  other  part  of  Ireland. 

4.  The  Kyle  Prize  to  be  attainable  only  by  Divinity  Students,  at  an 
annual  Examination  in  the  Irish  Language,  held  during  their  Divinity 
Course. 


/ 


222  DIVINITY  SCHOOL. 

5.  The  Divinity  Student  so  obtaining  the  Prize  may  again  become  a 
Candidate  for  it  in  the  next  succeeding  year,  but  not  oftener,  nor  can 
he  hold  it  fi)r  more  than  two  years. 

6.  The  Candidates  for  Examination  shall  be  examined  in  the  Irish 
Grammar,  the  Four  Gospels,  the  Acts  of  the  Apostles,  the  Epistle  to 
the  Romans,  1st  and  2nd  Timothy,  the  Epistle  to  the  Hebrews,  and 
Composition. 

7.  In  the  event  of  there  being,  in  any  year,  no  Candidate  for  the  Prize, 
or  want  of  sufficient  merit,  the  interest  of  the  sum  so  invested  in  the 
Funds  shall  be  added  to  the  principal  sum. 

The  amount  of  the  Prize  is  about  £12. 

THK    WILLIAM    BROOKE    EXHIBITION. 

[Greek  'Testament.) 
A  sum  of  money  having  been  subscribed  in  memory  of  the 
late  Right  Hon.  William  Brooke,  the  following  resolutions 
were  adopted  at  meetings  of  the  "William  Brooke  Memorial 
Committee,"  held  on  the  1st  and  8th  of  November,  1881,  and 
on  the  27th  of  February,  1882  :— 

"That  an  Exhibition  for  Students  attending  Divinity  Lectures,  pre- 
paratory to  taking  Orders  in  the  Church  of  Ireland,  shall  be  founded  as 
a  Memorial  of  the  late  Right  Honourable  William  Brooke." 

"  That  acquaintance  -with  the  Greek  Testament  shall  be  the  qualifica- 
tion for  such  Exhibition,  regard  being  also  had  to  personal  character, 
and  insufficiency  of  private  means." 

The  following  liegulations  were  also  adopted: — 

1.  The  sum  of  £500,  and  such  other  sums  as  may  be  contributed  for 
the  purpose,  shall  be  held  by  the  Representative  Body  of  the  Church  of 
Ireland  for  the  use  of  the  "  William  Brooke  Exhibition." 

2.  The  interest  of  this  Fund  shall  be  paid  every  year  to  an  Exhibi- 
tioner elected  by  a  Board,  consisting  of  the  Archbishop  of  Dublin,  the 
Regius  Professor  of  Divinity,  and  the  Professor  of  Biblical  Greek,  all 
for  the  time  being  ;  two  of  whom  shall  form  a  quorum. 

3.  Candidates  for  this  Exhibition  shall  satisfy  the  Board  as  to  their 
good  character,  their  intention  to  enter  the  Ministry  of  the  Chun  h  of 
Ireland,  and  the  insufficiency  of  their  means  to  pay  the  expenses  of  a 
theological  education. 

4.  In  electing  a  Candidate  so  qualified,  regard  shall  be  had  to  his 
answering  in  the  Greek  Testament  at  the  final  Examination  of  the 
Junior  Divinity  Class,  or  at  such  other  Examination  as  shall  be  ap- 
pointed by  the  Board,  who  shall  also  have  power  to  withhold  the  Exhi- 
bition if  they  shall  not  be  satisfied  with  the  qualifications  or  answering 
of  the  Candidates. 

5.  The  Candidate  so  elected  shall  hold  the  Exhibition  for  one  year  on 
condition  of  his  proceeding  regularly  with  the  Divinity  Course  during 
that  year. 


DIVINITT  SCHOOL.  223 

6.  In  the  event  of  the  interest  for  any  year  not  having  been  wholly 
expended  during  that  year,  the  Board  shall  place  the  unexpended  por- 
tion to  the  credit  of  the  capital  of  the  Fund. 

7.  It  shall  be  lawful  for  the  General  Synod  of  the  Church  of  Ireland 
by  Act  duly  passed,  and  also  for  the  Board  by  Resolution,  to  vary  the 
Regulations  of  the  said  Exhibition,  as  may  from  time  to  time  appear 
expedient,  in  any  manner  consistent  with  the  Resolutions  adopted  by 
the  Committee  at  their  meetings  aforesaid :  provided  that  any  Resolu- 
tions passed  by  the  Board  for  this  purpose  shall  be  presented  to  the 
General  Synod  at  its  first  meeting  after  the  passing  of  siich  Resolution. 

The  following  Exhibitions  are  awarded  without  a  Special 
Examination : — 


BUTCHEk     EXHIKITION6. 

A  sum  of  money  having  been  subscribed  in  memory  of  the 
Most  Rev.  Samuel  Butcher,  n.D.,  late  Bishop  of  Meath,  the 
following  plan  for  the  application  of  the  Fund  was  agreed  to 
at  a  Meeting  of  the  '•  Butcher  Memorial  Committee,"  held  on 
24th  April.  1877,  the  Provost  in  the  Chair,  and  adopted  bv  the 
Generil  Synod,  Aiiril  26th,  1877  :  — 

The  interest  on  the  money  in  the  hands  of  the  Representative  Body 
to  the  credit  of  the  above  Fund  (when  it  shall  have  reached  the  sum  of 
£2500),  and  of  such  further  sums  as  may  be  paid  in  to  its  credit  as 
subscriptions,  or  unallocated  interest  (as  hereinafter  referred  to),  to  be 
applied  in  providing  Exhibitions  in  connexion  with  the  Divinity  School 
of  the  Church  of  Ireland,  to  be  called  the  "Butcher  Exhibitions," 
under  the  following  rules:  — 

Ist.  That  the  Exhibitions  be  awarded  by  a  Board,  consisting  of  the 
Archbishop  of  Dublin,  for  the  time  being;  the  Bishop  of  Meath,  for  the 
time  being ;  and  the  Regius  Professor  of  Divinity,  for  the  time  being  ; 
or  (in  tlie  event  of  there  being  no  Regius  Professor  of  Divinity)  the 
Professor  wiio  may  discharge  the  duties  now  discharged  by  him  :  two  of 
whom  shall  form  a  quorum. 

2nd.  That  the  Exhibitions  be  conferred  on  meritorious  Divinity 
Students  who  purpose  entering  the  ministry  of  the  Church  of  Ireland, 
and  who  in  consequence  of  their  limited  means  may  require  assistance  in 
conipieting  their  theological  education,  regard  at  the  same  time  being  had 
to  their  attainments  and  their  general  fitness  for  the  ministry  of  the  Church. 

3rd.  That  these  Exhibitions  be  conferred  on  Students  who  shall  have 
completed  their  Junior  Divinity  year,  and  be  tenable  during  their  Senior 
year,  on  condition  of  their  duly  proceeding  with  their  Divinity  Course. 

4th.  That  the  Board  determine  the  number  and  amount  of  the  several 
Exhibitions,  provided  that  the  amount  of  any  one  shall  not  be  more  than 
£oO  or  less  than  £25. 

•5th.  That  in  the  event  of  there  not  being  a  sufficient  number  of  de- 
serving and  qualified  Candidates,  or  the  entire  interest  on  the  Fund 


224  DIVINITY   SCHOOI. 

within  any  year  not  being  expended,  from  any  other  cause,  the  Board 
be  empowered  to  place  the  unapplied  portion  of  the  annual  interest  to 
the  credit  of  the  capital  of  the  Fund. 

6th.  That  the  Exhibitions  be  paid  quarterly,  on  1st  Oct.,  1st  Jan., 
1st  April,  and  1st  July,  in  each  year,  by  an  cirder  on  the  Representative 
Body,  signed  by  the  Regius  or  other  Professor  of  Divinity  on  the  Board. 

7th.  That  it  be  in  the  power  of  the  General  Synod,  on  the  application 
of  the  Board,  to  vary  the  foregoing  regulations  as  circumstances  may 
require. 

Sth.  That  in  the  case  of  unavoidable  absence,  any  member  of  the 
Board  be  empowered  to  appoint,  by  writing,  a  substitute  to  act  for  him. 

UAUNT    ME.M01iIAL    EXHIBITIONS. 

A  sum  of  money  having  been  subscribed  in  memory  of  the  late 
Very  Rev.  Achilles  Daunt,  Dean  of  Cork,  the  following  plan  for 
the  application  of  the  fund  was  adopted  at  a  Meeting  of  the  Daunt 
Memorial  Committee,  held  June  26,  1879,  the  Bishop  of  Cashel  in 
the  Chair,  and  approved  by  the  General  Synod  of  the  Church  of 
Ireland,  April  27,  1880  :— 

1.  That  the  Exhibitions  be  awarded  by  a  Board,  consisting  of  the 

Archbishop  of  Dublin,  for  the  time  being  ;  the  Regius  Profes- 
sor of  Divinity,  for  the  time  being,  or  (in  the  event  of  there 
being  no  Regius  Professor  of  Divinity)  the  Professor  who  may 
discharge  the  duties  now  discharged  by  him  in  connexion  with 
the  Divinity  School;  and  the  Incumbent  of  St.  Matthias's 
Church,  for  the  time  being  ;  two  of  whom  shall  form  a  quorum. 

2.  That  the  Exhibitions  be  conferred  on  meritorious  Divinity  Stu- 

dents who  purpose  entering  the  ministry  of  the  Church  of  Ire- 
land, and  who,  in  consequence  of  their  limited  means,  may 
require  assistance  in  completing  their  theological  education, 
regard  at  the  same  time  being  had  to  their  attainments  and 
their  general  fitness  for  the  ministry  of  the  Church. 

3.  That  these  Exhibitions  be  conferred  on  students  who  shall  have 

commenced  their  Junior  Divinity  year,  and  be  tenable  during 
the  Junior  year,  on  condition  of  their  duly  proceeding  with 
their  Divinity  Course. 

4.  That  the  Board  determine  the  number  and  amounts  of  the  several 

Exhibitions,  provided  that  the  amount  of  any  one  shall  not  be 
more  than  £40  or  less  than  £20. 

5.  That  in  the  event  of  there  not  being  a  suiBcient  number  of  de- 

serving and  qualified  candidates,  or  the  entire  interest  on  the 
fund  within  any  year  not  being  expended  from  any  other  cause, 
the  Board  be  empowered  to  place  the  unapriied  portion  of  th*; 
annual  interest  to  the  credit  of  the  capital  of  the  fund. 

6.  That  the  Exhibitions  be   paid  quarterly,   on  1st  October,   1st 

January,  1st  April,  and  1st  July  in  each  year,  by  an  order  on 
the  Representative  Body,  signed  by  the  Regius  or  other  Pro- 
fessor of  Divinity  on  the  Board. 


DIVINITY   SCHOOL.  225 

7.  That  it  be  in  the  power  of  the  General  Synod,  on  the  application 

of  the  Board,  to  vary  the  foregoing  regulations  as  circunistancef 
may  require. 

8.  That  in  the  case  of  unavoidable   absence,  any  member  of  the 

Board  be  empowered  to  appoint,  by  writing,  a  substitute  to 
act  for  him. 

The  Regius  Professor  of  Divinity  receives  applications  for  the 
Daunt  and  Butcher  Exhibitions  in  the  first  week  of  Divinity 
Lectures  of  Michaelmas  Term. 


SALMON    EXHIBITION. 

This  Exhibition,  of  the  value  of  £20,  being  the  interest  on  a 
sum  of  £500  left  in  the  hands  of  the  Representative  Church  Body 
by  the  late  Rev.  George  Salmon,  D.D.,  sometime  Regius  Professor 
of  Divinitj-,  and  afterwards  Provost  of  Trinity  College,  to  be 
applied  "as  the  interests  of  the  Divinity  School  may  require," 
is  awarded  annually  in  Michaelmas  Term  on  the  same  conditions 
as  the  Daunt  Memorial  Exhibitions.  The  "  Salmon  Exhibition  " 
is  awarded  by  a  Board  consisting  of  the  Archbishop  of  Dublin, 
the  Provost  of  Trinity  College  (if  a  Member  of  the  Church  of 
Ireland,  or,  failing  hira,  the  Senior  of  the  Fellows  who  is  a 
Member  of  that  Church),  the  Regius  Professor  of  Divinity,  and 
Archbishop  King's  Professor  of  Divinity,  the  Archbishop  of  Dublin 
having  a  easting  vote  in  case  of  an  equality  of  votes. 

CAK80N    MEMOKIAL    EXHIBITION. 

In  Michaelmas  Terra,  1898,  a  sum  of  £180  Bank  of  Ireland 
Stock,  equivalent  to  about  £700  cash,  was  given  by  Miss  Frances 
Anna  Carson  to  found  an  Exhibition  in  the  Divinity  School,  in 
memory  of  her  father,  the  late  Rev.  Joseph  Carson,  D.D,,  Vice- 
Provost  of  Trinitv  College.  The  sum  yields  annuallv  about 
£20. 

The  following  Regulations  were  suggested  by  the  donor,  and 
have  been  adopted  by  the  Provost  and  Senior  Fellows : — 

1.  The  Exhibition  shall  be  called  the  Carson  Memorial  Exhibition. 

1.  It  shall  be  awarded  annually  by  a  Board  consisting  of  the  Provost, 
the  Regius  Professor  of  Divinity,  and  Archbishop  King's  Professor. 

3.  This  Board  shall,  in  Michaelmas  Term,  elect  as  Exhibitioner  a 
Student  who,  in  that  Term,  shall  have  entered  the  Senior  Divinity  Class 
and  shall  declare  his  intention  of  offering  himself  for  the  ministry  of  the 
Church  of  Ireland  or  some  Church  in  communion  therewith. 

4.  In  electing,  the  Board  shall  have  regard  to  the  character,  ability, 
attainments,  and  general  promise  of  fitness  for  the  sacred  office,  of  such 
Student,  as  well  as  to  his  need  of  pecuniary  assistance. 

l3 


226  DIVINITY   SCHOOL. 

■5.  The  Exhibitioner  is  entitled  to  receive  in  December  the  dividend 
of  the  preceding  August,  on  his  producing  a  certificate  from  the  Eegius 
Professor,  that  he  has  satisfied  the  requirements  of  the  School  to  the 
end  of  Michaelmas  Term :  and  the  February  dividend  in  June,  on  pro- 
duction of  a  similar  certificate  for  Trinity  Term. 

6.  The  Exhibitioner  shall  be  required,  on  election,  to  promise  that  he 
will  not  receive  Holy  Orders  until  he  shall  have  obtained  the  Divinity 
Testimonium. 

WALLACE    EXHIBITION. 

In  Trinity  Term,  1899,  the  Rev.  William  Wallace,  D.D.,  Litt.D., 
gave  to  the  College  a  sura  of  £500  to  found  an  Exhibition  in  the 
Divinity  School. 

The  following  Regulations  have  been  adopted  by  the  Provost 
and  Senior  Fellows  : — 

1.  The  Exhibition  shall  be  called  the  Wallace  Exhibition. 

2.  It  shall  be  awarded  annually  by  a  Board  consisting  of  the  Prcyosi:, 
the  Regius  Professor  of  Divinity,  and  Archbishop  King's  Professor 
provided  always,  that  if  the  Provost  for  the  time  being  be  not  a  member 
of  the  Church  of  Ireland,  the  Senior  of  the  Fellows  wlio  is  such  shall 
take  his  place  on  the  electing  Board,  it  being  the  intention  of  the  Donor 
that  the  Board  shall  always  consist  of  Members  of  the  Church  of  Ireland. 

3.  The  remaining  Regulations  shall  correspond  with  those  in  force 
for  the  Carson  Memorial  Exhibition. 

The  Fund  given  bv  Dr.  Wallace  produces  annuallv  about 
£13. 

BKLSHAW    SCHOLARSHIPS. 

In  the  year  1911  Mr.  Robert  Redman  Belshaw  founded  four 
Scholarships  to  be  awarded,  one  each  year,  if  suitable  candidates 
present  themselves.  A  Candidate  must  be  a  Student  in  the 
Divinity  School  and  a  Student  in  Arts  of  Trinity  College,  Dublin. 
He  must  also  have  offered  himself  to,  and  have  been  accepted 
by,  the  Church  Missionary  Society  as  a  tit  person  to  he  trained 
to  become  a  Missionary  of  the  Gospel  in  Foreign  Parts.  The 
Scholarships  are  to  be  called,  The  Belshaw,  The  Beddy,  The  John 
Jacob,  and  The  Christian  Jacob,  respectively.  Each  Scholarship 
is  of  the  annual  value  of  £40,  and  is  held  for  two  or  three  years 
as  the  Trustees  may  direct.  The  Scholarship  is  awarded  to  the 
best  answerer  amongst  the  suitable  Candidates  at  an  examination 
to  be  held  notoftener  than  once  a  year.  Candidates  should  send 
their  names  and  lists  of  qualifications  to  Archbishop  King's  Pro- 
fessor of  Divinity  as  soon  as  possible  after  the  beginning  of  the 
Academic  Year  in  October.  Women  intending  to  be  Missionaries, 
and  provisionally  accepted  as  such,  are  eligible  for  these  Scholar- 
ships provided  tliey  shall  have  passed  at  least  one  division  of  the 
Examination  for  the  Diploma  for  Women  in  Religious  Knowledge. 


I' 


tyiYimiY  SCHOOL.  S!27 

ARRANGEMENTS  FOR  1922-2;i. 

I. — Lectures. 

Begrin  End 

Mi<;HAKr-MAs  TiMiM,  1922:  — 

Seuior  Class,    .         Fri.,      Oct.  20,  .  Tiies.,  Dec.  12. 

Junior     ,,       .         Thurs.,  Oct.  19,  .  Mon.,  Dec.  11. 

Hebrew,  .         Tues.,    Nov.  7,  .  Thurs.,  Dec.  14. 

PastoiiilTlieology,  Sat.,      Oct.  28,  .  Sat.,  Dec.     2. 

HiLAuv  Tkkm, 1923 : — 

Senior  Class,    .         Fri.,      Jun.  19,  .  'I'ues.,  Mar.  13. 

Junior     ,,        .         Mon.,    Jan.  22,  .  Tliurs.,  Mar.  15. 

Hebrew,  .         Thurs.,  Feb.    1,  .  Thurs.,  Mar.  15. 

Tastoral  Theology,  Sat.,      Jan.  27,  .  Sat.,  Mar.     3. 

Trinity  Tkicm,  1923:— 

Senior  Glass,    .         Fri.,      April  20,  .  Tues.,  June  12. 

Junior    ,,        .         Tliurs.,  Aiiril  19,  .  Tliurs.,  June  14. 

Hebrew,  .         Tues.,    May    8,  .  Thurs.,  June  14. 

Pastoral  Theology,  Sat.,      April  28,  .  Sat.,  June    2. 

M  i(!H  AKi.MAS  Tkkm,  1923  : — 

Seuior  Glass,    .         Fri.,       Oct.  19.  .  Tues.,  Dec.   11. 

Junior    ,,        .         Thurs.,  Oct.  18,  .  Mon.,  Dec.  10. 

Hebrew.  .         Tuea.,    Nov.  6,  .  Thurs.,  Dec.  13. 

rastoral  Theology,  Sat.,       Oct.  27,  .  Siit.,  Dec.     1. 


II. — Ordinary  Examinations. 

MiciiAKi.MAS  Tkkm,  1922  : — 

(S««ior  CVrt**  (1st  Supplemental),  .         .  Tues.,  Oct.  17. 

,,          ,,     (2nd           ,,            ),  .         .  Wed.,  Dec.  13. 

Junior    ,,     (1st            ,,            ),  .         .  Mon.,  Oct.  16. 

,,         ,,     (2nd           ,,           ),  .         .  Tues.,  Dec.  12. 

llii.Auv  Tkum,  1923  : — 

5e«io»' C/«s»  (Supplemental),  .        .  Wed.,  Mar.  14. 

Junior    „                 ,,  •         •  Fi'i->  Mar.  16. 

TiuNiTv  TuRM,  1923  :— 

Senior  Class  (Final),  .         .  Wed.,  June  13. 

Junior    ,,     (General),  .         .  Fri.,  June  15. 

MiOHAKi.MAs  Tkkm,  1923  :  — 

<S«)/Joj- C/rt«s  (1st  Supplemental),  .         .  Tues.,  Oct.   16. 

„       ,,      (2nd             „          ),  .         .  Wed.,  Dec.  12. 

Junior    ,,     (1st  Supplemental),  .         .  Mon.,  Oct.  15. 

„         ,,      (2iid              „          ),  .          .  Tues.,  Dec.  11. 


^28  biviNiTY  scnooi. 

III. — Entrance  Exaiuiuations. 

Michaelmas  Teum,  1922,  Wed.,  October  18. 

HiLAiiY  Teum,  1923,        .  Sat.,    January  20. 

Trinity  Teum,  1923,       .  Wed.,  April  18. 

MicHAi;i-MAs  TiJUM,  L923,  Wed.,  October  17. 

IV. — Exhibition  and  Prize  Examinations. 

Michaelmas  Teum,  1922,     Archbishop     King's     Prizes    and    Bishop 
Forster's  Premiums,  Wed.,  Oct.  18. 

IIiLAUY  Term,  1923,        .     Carson  and  Toplady  Prizes,  Tues.,  Feb.  20. 
Tlieological  Exhibitions,  Tiies.,  Wed.,  and 
Thurs.,  March  6,  7,  8. 

TuiNiTY  Teum,  1923,       .  *Biblical  Greek  Prizes. 

*Ecclesiastical  History  Prizes. 
Weir  Prize,  Fri.,  June  15. 
Dr.  Downes'  Premiums: — Written  Essay, 
Wed.,    May  9  ;    Extempore    Speaking, 
Wed.,   May   16;  Reading  the  Liturgy, 
Wed.,  May  23,  Wed.,  May  30. 
tWall  Biblical  Scholarship, 
t Hebrew  Premiums. 

Michaelmas  Tkum,  1923,     Archbishop    King's    Prizes    and     Bisliop 
Forsters  Premiums,  Wed.,  Oct.   17. 


»  Date  fixed  by  the  Professor. 

t  Not  conflned'to  Divinity  Students.    Notice  must  be  given  to  the  Senior  Lecturer. 
See  under  "  Notice." 


(     229    ) 


LAW  SCHOOL. 

The  Law  School  of  the  University  of  Dublin  is  uuder  the  control 
of  the  Provost  and  Senior  Fellows  of  Trinity  College,  who,  however, 
act  in  concurrence  with  the  Benchers  of  the  King's  Inns. 

The  Lectures  delivered  in  the  Law  School  of  the  University, 
taken  along  with  those  delivered  at  the  King's  Inns,  constitute  a 
complete  Course  of  instruction  in  Theoretical,  Scientific,  and 
Practical  Law. 

Students  joining  the  Law  School  are  requested  to  enter  their 
names  with  the  Registrar  of  the  School  at  the  beginning  of 
Michaelmas  Term.  Certificates  for  attendance  at  Lectures 
(Ordinary  or  Honor),  or  for  passing  examinations,  and  recog- 
nition of  professional  privileges,  will  be  granted  to  Kegistered 
Students  only.  Solicitors'  Apprentices  who  are  not  Students  of 
Trinity  College  are  required  to  pay  a  fee  of  £'i  '6s.  to  the  Junior 
liursar  on  registration. 

The  staff  of  the  Law  School  consists  of  the  following: — 

The  Regius  Professor  of  Laws. 
The  Regius  Professor  of  Feudal  and  English  Lum-. 
The  Lecturer  in  Civil  Law  and  General  Jurisprudence. 
The  Reid  Professor  of  Constitutional  and  Criminal  Law. 
The  Reader  in  Indian  Law. 


REGULATIONS. 

Regius  Professor  of  Laws. 

The  Regius  Professor  of  Laws  lectures  on  Jurisprudence  and 
InterualioHal  Law  on  Tuesdays  and  Fridays  at  10  o'clock,  a.m., 
and  is  bound  to  deliver  not  less  than  twelve  Lectures  in  each 
of  the  three  College  Terms. 

The  Suljects  of  the  Lectures  are  as  follows : — 

Michaelmas  Tekm. 

The  elements  of  Analytical  Jurisprudence. 

Hilary  Tkrm. 

The  nature,  source,  and  development  of  International  Law.     The 
rights  and  duties  of  States  in  time  of  peace. 

Trinity  Term. 

International     Disputes.      The     Law    of    War.      The    Law    of 
Neutrality. 


230  Law  school. 

Reifiiis  Professor  oj  Feudal  and  Eiu/lish  Late, 

The  Regius  Professor  of  Feudal  and  English  Law  lectures  (oii 
Wednesdays  and  Saturdays  at  9  o'clock,  a.m.)  on  The  Law 
of  Property,  and  is  bound  to  deliver  not  less  than  twelve 
Lectures  in  each  of  the  three  College  Terras. 

The  Subjects  of  the  Lectures  are  as  follows : — 

Michaelmas  Tkiim.  The  origin  and  development  of  the  law  of  Real 
Property.  Tenure  and  Estates.  Freehold  and  Leasehold  Interests, 
Uses  and  Trusts. 

HiLAUY  Term.  Future  Interests.  Co- Ownership.  Mortgages.  The 
Transfer  of  Ownership  inter  vivos  and  on  death. 

Trinity  Term.  Involuntary  Alienation.  Incorporeal  Hereditaments 
(including  Easements).  The  Irish  Land  Acts  and  Land  Purchase 
Acts. 

[The  following  text-books  may  be  referred  to  as  dealing  with  tlie 
matters  discussed  in  the  Lectures :  "Williams,  Real  Property  ; 
Strahan  and  Baxter,  General  View  of  the  Law  of  Property;  Goodeve, 
Modern  Law  of  Real  Property.] 

Hhe  Lecturer  in  Civil  Law  and  General  Jurisprudence. 

The  Lecturer  in  Civil  Law  and  General  Jurisprudence  lectures 
in  each  of  the  three  College  Terms  on  Tuesdays  and  Fridays  at 
9  o'clock,  a.m. 

The  Subject  is  Roman  Law,  and  the  Books  used  will  be  :  — 

The  Institutes  of  Justinian  (Moyle's  Edition). 
•  Leage,  Roman  Private  Law. 


Reid  Professor  of  Cotistitutiotial  and  Criminal  Law. 

The  lleid  Professor  lectures  during  the  year  on  the  following 
subjects: — 

Michaelmas  Term.     Constitutional  Law  and  History. 
Hilary  Term.     Criminal  Law  and  Procedure. 
Trinity  Term.     The  Law  of  Evidence. 

The  Held  Professor  lectures  on  Mondays  and  Thursdays  at 
9  o'clock,  a.m.,  and  twelve  Lectures  at  least  are  delivered  in  each 
Term.  Tlie  Lectures  on  Penal  Legislation  are  open  to  the  public. 
A  fee  of  One  Guinea  a  Term  is  payable  by  other  Students  (not 
being  Students  of  Trinity  College  or  of  the  King's  Inns  or 
Solicitors'  apprentices)  who  attend  the  second  and  third  Courses 
of  Lectures. 


t,Aw  scAoot.  231 

Reader  in  Indian   Law. 

The  Reader  in  Indian  Law  lectures  selected  Candidates  for  the 
Indian  Civil  Service. 

The  Ordinary  Law  Lectures  are  open  to  Students  and  to  the 
Public,  save  as  above  mentioned,  without  payment,  and  no  Fee  is 
required  from  Students  of  the  King's  Inns  beyond  that  already 
paid  by  them  on  admission  into  that  Society. 

Honor  Lectures. 

Hojior  Lectures  are  delivered  on  the  Law  subjects  of  the 
Honor,  Prize,  and  Moderatorship  Courses  by  the  Professors  of  the 
Law  School  :  see  under  Legal  and  Political  Sciknck  for 
Courseb. 

Thes«  Lectures  are  as  follows : — 

JUNIOR  S0PHI8TKKS. 

Michaelmas  Term. 

*  Jurisprudence.  |  Constitutional  History 

'Roman  Law.  j 

Hilary  Term. 
•Roman  Law.  j        *Constitutional  Law. 

•International  Law.  | 

Trinity  Term. 
*Roman  Law.  I  Law  of  Evidence. 

♦International  Law.  | 

Lectures  marked  thus  *  are  intended  to  supplement  the  ordinary 
Lectures  on  the  given  subject. 

SKNIOK   SOPHISTERS. 
Michaelmas  Term. 
Historical  Jurisprudence.  I  Law  of  Contract. 

Equity.  | 

Hilary  Term. 
Equity.  |  Law  of  Torts. 

Trinity  Term. 
Private  International  Law.  I  Legal  History. 

Equity.  | 

Lectures  on  Economics,  Political  Science,  and  Economic 
History  are  also  available  for  Junior  and  Senior  Sophisters. 

It  is  the  duty  of  each  Professor  to  attend  the  Examination  in 
person  while  the  Students  are  engaged  upon  his  Paper.  In  case  he 
is  unable  so  to  attend,  he  is  bound  to  give  notice  thereof  to  the 
Registrar  of  the  Law  School.  On  receiving  such  notice,  the 
Registrar  is  required  to  provide  a  substitute  from  among  the 
Fellows  and  Professors,  whose  duty  it  is  to  keep  the  Hall  during 
such  Examination. 


232  LAW   SCHOOL. 

The  Professors  are  bound  at  the  end  of  Michaelmas  and  Hilary 
Terras  to  furnish  to  the  Senior  Lecturer  a  List  of  all  Students 
having  their  names  on  the  College  Books,  and  of  all  King's  Inns 
Students  or  Solicitors'  Apprentices  who  have  credit  for  the  Term. 
At  the  end  of  Trinity  Term  they  are  bound  to  furnish  to  the 
Senior  Lecturer  a  List  of  all  Students  liaving  their  names  on  the 
College  Books,  and  of  all  King's  Inns  Students  or  Solicitors' 
Apprentices  who  have  credit  for  the  Term,  as  well  as  of  tliose 
who  have  obtained  Academic  credit  for  the  year. 

KEEPING    OF   TEKMS. 

A  Term  is  kept  by  attendance  at  three-fourths  of  the  Lectures, 
and  by  passing  the  Examination  held  at  the  end  of  the  Term. 

A  General  Examination  is  held  by  each  Professor  in  Trinity 
Term  at  the  end  of  the  Academic  year. 

To  obtain  Academic  credit  for  the  year  with  any  Professor, 
Students  must  keep  three  consecutive  Terms,  commencing  with 
Michaelmas  Term,  and  pass  the  General  Examination  held  at  the 
close  of  Trinity  Term. 

Any  Student  who  fails  to  pass  a  Term  Examination  may,  with 
the  permission  of  the  Examiner,  present  himself  at  a  Supple- 
mental Kxaminatiou  to  be  held  in  the  following  Term. 

For  any  Supplemental  Examination  a  fee  of  £1  Is.  must  be  paid 
to  the  Junior  Bursar  before  the  Examination. 

To  obtain  the  certificate  required  by  the  Benchers,  the  answering 
at  a  Term  Examination  must  not  fall  below  30  per  cent,  with  any 
Examiner,  and  at  a  General  Examination  an  average  of  40  per 
cent,  with  two  Examiners  is  required,  and  the  answering  must 
not  fall  below  35  ner  cent,  with  either 

LAW   PUKMIUMS. 

At  the  end  of  Trinity  Term  Prizes  amounting  to  £45  may 
be  awarded  by  the  Professors  at  their  discretion  to  the  best 
answerers  among  the  Students  whose  names  are  on  the  College 
Booko,  and  who  have  obtained  Academic  credit  for  the  year. 
The  merits  of  the  Candidates  will  be  determined  by  the 
aggregate  of  marks  obtained  by  them  at  the  three  Examinations 
which  follow,  respectively,  the  Michaelmas,  Hilary,  and  Trinity 
Courses  of  Lectures. 

DUTIES  OP  THE  REGISTKAE  OK  THE  LAW  SCHOOL. 

It  shall  be  the  duty  of  the  Registrar  of  the  Law  School  to  copy 
the  Lists  furnished  by  the  Professors  to  the  Senior  Lecturer  into 
separate  Books,  to  be  provided  for  that  purpose. 


LAW    SCHOOL. 


233 


It  shall  be  the  duty  of  the  lle5,Mstrar  of  the  Law  School  to  give 
to  all  Students,  including  those  of  the  King's  Inns,  such  certificates 
of  attendance  as  they  may  be  entitled  to  and  may  require. 

The  Registrar  of  the  Law  School  shall  be  authorised  to  issue 
Certificates  of  Attendance  on  the  lectures  of  the  Professors  of  the 
Law  School  by  Solicitors'  Apprentices  who  are  not  Students  of 
Trinity  College,  on  condition  that  for  each  year  of  such  attendance, 
a  fee  o'f  £3  6s.  shall  be  paid  to  the  Junior  Bursar,  Trinity  College, 
by  every  such  apprentice  who  requires  a  Certificate. 

Rkgulations  of  the  University  tvith  reijard  to  Deijrees  in  Late. 

The  Regius  Professor  of  Laws  is  Moderator  in  all  disputations 
for  Degrees  in  Law,  and  presents  the  Candidates  for  those  Degrees 
at  the  Commencements. 

The  Degrees  are  Bachelor  and  Doctor  in  iitroque  Jure, 

1.  Bachelor  in  Laws  {LL.B.). 

A  Bachelor  in  Latvs  must  have  taken  the  Degree  of  Bachelor 
in  Arts  or  the  Degree  of  Master  in  Arts  of  the  University  of 
Dublin  (unless  he  seek  the  degree  ad  eundeni  as  an  LL.B.  of 
Cambridge,  or  a  B.C.L.  of  Oxford ;  see  page  16).  He  must  also 
have  passed  the  following  Examinations: — 

1.  The  Intermediate  Examination  in  Law. 

2.  The  Final  Examination  for  the  Degree  of  LL.B. 

Text-books  given  in  brackets  are  intended  to  indicate  approximately 
the  general  knowledge  reqiiired  of  Candidates  under  each  bead. 

2.    The  Intermediate  Exaiiiinaiiou  in  Lau\ 

Candidates  may  present  themselves  at  this  Examination  if 
tliey  have  kept  one  term  bi/  examination  in  the  Junior  Sophister 
year. 

The  subjects  of  examination  and  the  mai^ks  assigned  to  each 
subject  shall  be  as  follows: — 

1.  Jurisprudence — 100  marks. 

[Holland,  Elements  of  Jurisprudence. 
Markby,  Elements  of  Law. 
Maine,  Ancient  Law  (edited  Pollock).] 

2.  International  Law — 100  marks. 

[Lawren<e,  Principles  of  International  Law. 
Hall,  International  Law. 

Pitt  Cobbett,  Leading  Cases  in  International  Law.] 
3    Roman  Law — 1.50  marks. 

["The  Institutes  "  of  Justinian,  edited  by  J.  B.  Movie. 
Leage,  Roman  Private  Law.] 
4.  Constitutional  Law  and  History — 150  marks. 

[Dicey,    Introduction    to    the    Study    of  the    Law    of    the 

Constitution  (latest  Edition). 
Anson,  Law  and  Custom  of  the  Constitution. 
Thomas,  Leading  Cases  in  Constiiiuional  Ijaw.] 


234  LAW  SCHOOL.  I 

ii.    llie  Final  Extnuinaiion  for  the  Veipee  of  LL.B. 

Candidates  who  have  passed  the  Intermediate  Examination  in 
Law  may  present  themselves  at  this  examination,  provided  that 
they  are  in  a  position  to  present  tliemselves  for  the  examination  for 
tlie  Degree  of  B.A.,  or  have  already  passed  the  Examination  for 
the  Degree  of  B.A. 

The  subjects  of  examination  and  the  marks  assigned  to  each 
subject  shall  be  as  follows  : — 

1.  The  Law  of  Property  (Real  and  Personal) — 250  marks. 

[Strahan,  General  View  of  the  Law  of  Property. 
Williams,  Law  of  Ileal  Property. 
Goodeve,  Law  of  Real  Property.] 

2.  The  Law  of  Obligations— 200  marks. 

[Anson,  Principles  of  the  English  Law  of  Contract. 
Pollock,  The  Law  of  Torts.] 

3.  Equity — 150  marks. 

[Strahan  and  Kenrick,  Digest  of  Equity  ; 
H.  A.  Smith,  Principles  of  Equity.] 

4.  Criminal  Law — 75  marks. 

[Kenny,  Outlines  of  Criminal  Law.] 

0.  The  Law  of  Evidence — 75  marks. 

[Stephen,  Digest  of  the  Law  of  Evidence.] 

Candidates  who  have  crodit  for  attendance  on  the  Lectures  of 
the  Keader  in  Dutch-Roman  Law,  or  who  have  obtained  special 
permission,  may  substitute  for  1.  "The  Law  of  Property  (Real 
and  Personal)"  the  following  subject : — 

L  {a)  Roman- Dutch  Law,         .         .         250  marks. 

[Van  der  Linden,  Institutes  of  tlie  Law  of  Holland; 
Grotius,  Introduction  to  Dutch  Jurisprudence; 
Van  der  Kessel.  Theses  Seleetae  : 
Van  Leeuwen,  Cormnentaries  on  Roman-Dutch  Law.] 

Such  Candidates  may,  further,  substitute  for  o.  "Equity"   the 
following  subject : — 

3.  [a]  Roman  and  Pionian-Dutch  Law,  Special  Course,     150  marks. 

JustiTiian.  Digest,  Lib.  46,  Titles  1,  2. 
Voet,  Ad  Pandectas,  Lib.  46,  Titles  1,  2. 

Candidates  selected  for  the  Civil  Service  of  India,  or  engaged 
in  that  service,  or  persons  who  have  credit  for  attendance  on  the 
lectures  of  the  Reader  in  Indian  Law,  or  who  have  obtained  special 


LAW    SCHOOL.  235 

permission,  may  subsfitute  for — 1.  "  The  Law  of  Property  (Ileal 
and  Personal)"  the  following  subject: — 

1.  («)  Hindu  and  Muhammadan  LaM',         250  marks. 

[Mayne,  Hindu  Law  and  Usage  : 
Sir  E,.  K.  Wilson,  Digest  of  Anglo-Mnhammadan  Law.] 

Such  Candidates  may,  further,  substitute  for — 4.  "Criminal  Law" 
the  following  subject : — 

4.  (a)  Indian  Criminal  Law  and  Procedure,     7o  marks. 

[Indian  Penal  Code ; 
The  Code  of  Criminal  Procedure.] 

And  for — o.  "  The  Law  of  Evidence  "  the  following  subject :  — 

5.  (rt)  The  Indian  Evidence  Act,  75  marks. 


Candidates  for  either  the  Intermediate  Examination  or  the 
Final  Examination  are  required  to  give  fourteen  days'  notice 
to  the  Kegistrar  of  the  Law  School,  and  to  pay  to  the  Senior 
Proctor  at  the  same  time  an  examination  fee  of  £2  2s.  Fees  so 
paid  will  be  allowed,  up  to  the  amount  of  £6  6«.,  in  part  pay- 
ment for  the  Degree  fee  of  £11  los. 

Graduates  of  Oxford  or  Cambridge  must  pay  the  fees  necessary 
for  the  Degree  ad  ewuiem  which  they  propose  to  take  previous  to 
presenting  themselves  at  the  Examination  for  the  Degree  of 
LL.B.or  LL.l). 


XL — Doctor  in  Laws  [LL.l).). 

A  Doctor  in  Laws  must  he  a  B.A.  of  three  years'  standing  in 
either  Dublin,  Oxford,  or  Cambritlge  ;  and  must  liave  taken  the 
LL.B.  degree  either  by  examination  ur  ad  cundem  as  an  LL.B.  of 
Cambridge,  or  as  a  B.C.L.  of  Oxford  (see  p.  16).  Fee,  £11  los. 
Furthermore,  the  exaiuination  for  the  degree  of  LL.B.  in  Dublin, 
or  Cambridge,  or  that  for  the  B.C.L.  in  Oxford,  must  have  been 
passed  at  least  one  year  previously  ;  though  in  special  cases  the 
Board  mav  relax  this  rule.  The  fee  for  the  Degree  of  LL.D.  is 
£22. 

Candidates  may  qualify  themselves  to  obtain  the  Degree  in  one 
of  three  ways — 

(1).  By  passing  an  Exatiiinalion. 


236  LAW    SCHOOL. 

(2).  By  presenting  an  unpublished  Thesis  on  a  subject  connected  M'ith 
legal  or  political  studies,  of  merit  sufficient,  in  the  judgment  of  the 
Examiners,  to  entitle  the  candidate  to  the  Degree.  The  Examiners  have 
power,  if  they  consider  it  necessary,  to  examine  the  candidate  on  the 
subject-matter  of  his  Thesis,  as  well  as  on  subjects  connected  therewith. 

A  candidate  who  adopts  this  method  is  required  to  notify  to  the 
Registrar  of  the  Law  School,  for  the  consideration  of  the  Professors,  not 
later  tlum  six  months  before  Commencements,  the  subject  on  which  he 
proposes  to  submit  a  Thesis.  He  will  then  l)e  informed  wliether  in  the 
opinion  of  the  Professors  t})e  subject  proposed  is  suitable.  Three 
printed  or  type-written  copies  of  the  Thesis  must  be  sent  to  the  Registrar 
of  tfteLaw  School  at  least  two  months  before  the  day  of  Commencements, 
and  at  the  same  time  the  candidate  must  lodge  with  the  Bursar  the  sum 
of  £.5,  to  be  paid  to  an  Extern  Examiner  appointed  by  the  Board,  who, 
together  with  such  one  of  the  Law  Professors  as  the  Board  sliall  appoint 
for  that  purpose,  shall  report  to  the  Board  on  the  merits  of  the  Thesis. 
Should  the  Degree  be  granted,  the  sum  so  paid  will  be  allowed  in  part 
payment  to  the  Senior  Proctor  of  the  Degree  Fee  of  £22. 

(3).  By  submitting  original  published  work  of  merit  sufficient,  in  the 
judgment  of  the  Law  Professors,  to  entitle  the  candidate  to  the  Degree. 
The  Professors  have  power,  if  they  consider  it  necessary,  to  question 
the  Author  personally  on  his  work,  as  well  as  on  cognate  subjects.  Such 
candidates  should  communicate  with  the  Registrar  of  the  Law  School  at 
least  three  months  before  the  day  of  Commencements. 

Tlie  work  of  candidates  for  t)ie  Degree  of  LL.D.,  other  than  those 
who  take  the  Degree  by  examination,  must  show  evidence  of  independent 
inquiry,  and  must  either  contain  sume  substantial  addition  to  knowledge, 
or  present  a  fresh  interpretation  of  materials  already  used. 

The  Subjects  of  Examination,  and  the  marks  allotted  to  each, 
are  as  follows  :  — 


1.  Roman  Law. — 100  marks. 

{ft)  Candidates  will  be  examined  in  the  Principles  and  History 
of  Roman  Law. 

{b)  A  special  paper  will  be  set  on  a  prescribed  Title  of  the 
Digest,  ilntil  further  notice,  the  prescribed  Title  of 
the  Digest  will  be ;  Book  XIX,  Title  2  (Locali 
Conducti). 

2.  English  Law — General  Paper. — 100  marks. 

A  general  paper  will  be  set,  intended  to  test  the  Candidate's 
knowledge  of  the  several  brunches  of  English  Law  com- 
prised in  the  Course  for  the  LL.B.  Examination. 

3.  English  Law. — 100  marks. 

(«)  The  Law  of  Trusts  (omitting  the  Law  of  Charitable  Trusts). 
(b)  Actionable  Misrepresentation  and  Fraud. 


LAW  SCHOOL.  237 

4.  Jurisprudence,  Theoretical  and  Historical.— 100  marks. 

rHolland,  Elements  of  Jurisprudence. 
Maikby,  Elements  of  Law. 
Holmes,  The  Common  Law. 
Maine,  Early  History  of  Institutions.] 

5.  International  Law  (including  Private  International  Law).— 100 

marks. 

(a)  The  Treatment  of  Commerce  in  War. 
{b)  The  Law  of  Foreign  Corrorationa. 

C.  Theory  of  Legislation. — 100  marks. 

[Bentham,  Theory  of  Legislation. 
Sidirwick.  Elements  of  Politics,  chaps,  iii.-xiii 
M'Kectinie,  State  and  Individual,  Part  2. 
Dicey,  Law  and  Public  Opinion  in  England.] 

7.  Legal  History. — 100  marks, 

[Digby,  History  of  the  Law  of  Real  Property. 

Holdsworth,  History  of  English  Law,  vol.  i. 

Pollock  and  Maitland,    History  of   English  Law.     Book   i., 

Book  II.,  chaps,  i.,  iv.,  ix. 
Jenks,  History  of  English  Law.] 

8.  Public  Administration. — 100  marks. 

[Goodnow,  Comparaiive  Administrative  Lav*. 

P.  Ashley,  Local  and  Central  Government. 

Wright  and  Hobhouse,  Local  Government  and  Taxation.] 

2fos.  (1),  (2),  and  (3)  are  compulsory :  but  every  Gaudidate  must  in 
addition  answer  in  two  of  the  five  remaining  subjects. 

Candidates  must  send  to  tlie  Registrar  of  the  Law  School  notice 
of  the  subjects  which  they  select  one  month  before  the  examination, 
and  must,  at  the  same  time,  pay  to  the  Senior  Proctor  the  fee  of  £4, 
charged  for  each  entry  for  the  examination.  These  fees  are  allowed, 
up  to  the  amount  of  £8,  in  part  payment  to  the  Senior  Proctor  of  the 
Degree  Fee  of  £22. 

Text-books  given  in  brackets  are  intended  to  indicate  approximately 
the  general  knowledge  required  of  candidates  under  each  head. 

At  the  Examination  for  the  Degrees  of  LL.D.  and  LL.B.,  and 
the  Intermediate  Examination  in  Law,  Candidates  who  have 
obtained  50  per  cent,  of  the  aggregate  marks,  and  who  have 
satished  the  Examiners  in  the  several  subjects  of  examination, 
are  arranged  in  two  classes.  The  usual  standard  for  first 
Class  is  65  per  cent,  for  LL.D.  and  LL.B.  Examinations,  and 
tiO  per  cent,  for  the  Intermediate  Examination  in  Law.    In  each 


238  LAW    SCHOOL. 

class  the  names  are  arranged  in  order  of  merit.  Those  of  the 
remaining  candidates  for  the  Intermediate  Examination  in  Law 
or  the  Final  Examination  for  the  Degree  of  LL.B.  who  have 
obtained  40  per  cent,  of  the  aggregate  marks  and  not  less  than 
30  per  cent,  in  each  subject  are  allowed  the  examination,  and 
arranged  in  alphabetical  order  as  unclassed  candidates. 


Students  desiring  information  with  regard  to  the  Regulations 
of  King's  Inns,  or  the  London  Inns,  should  apply  in  the  former 
case  to  the  Under  Treasurer,  King's  Inns,  Dublin,  and  in  the 
latter  case  to  the  Clerk  of  the  Council  of  Legal  Education, 
Lincoln's  Inn,  London. 


DAYS   OF   EXAMINATION   AND   COMMENCEMKNXS. 

Examinations  for  the  Degrees  of  LL.B.  and  LL.I).  and  the 
Intermediate  Examination  in  Law  will  commence  on  Tuesday, 
December  5,  1922,  and  Tuesday,  June  5,  Tuesday,  December  4, 
1923. 

Term  Examinations  will  be  held  as  follows  : — 

/  Constilutional  Law,  Thursday,  November  23. 
Michaelmas  Term,  \  Feudaland  English  Law,  Wednesday,  Nov.  22. 

1922.  j  Civil  Law,  Friday,  November  2i. 

I  Jurisprudence,  Monday,  November  27. 

/  Criminal  Law,  Thursday,  February  22. 
TT.r  »vv  Tw«M  \  ^^^^^  ^^^'  Monday,  February  26. 

1923  {  Feudal  and  English  Law,  Saturday,  February 

V  International  Law,  Tuesday,  February  27. 

/  Constitutional  and  Criminal  LaM',  Thursday, 
,,.  i      May  31. 

Trinity  lERM,  )  ^ivil  Law,  Friday,  June  1. 

'■^^  I  Feudal  and  English  Law, Wednesday,  May  30. 

V  International  Law,  Saturday,  June  2. 

/  Constitutional  Law,  Thursday,  November  22. 
Michaelmas  Tekm,  \  Feudal  and  English  Law,  Wednesday,  Nov. 21. 

1923.  )  Civil  Law,  Friday,  November  23. 

'  Jurisprudence,  Monday,  November  26. 


Degrees    will    be    conferred    on    December    20,    1922,    and 
February  13,  April  20,  June  23,  and  December  20,  1923. 


J 


REGULATIONS 


SCHOOL     OF     PHYSIC, 


New  Regulations  are  introduced  only  after  due  notice,  but 
when  introduced  they  are  binding  xipon  all  Students  of  the 
Medical  School. 


The  School  of  Phvsic  in  the  Universitv  of  Dublin  consistb  of  the 
following  Staff  for  1922-23:— 

Regius  Professor  of  Physic. — John  Mallet  Purser,  M.D..  Sc.D. 

Repius  Professor  of  Surgery Sir  William  Taylor,  K.B.E.,  C.B.,  M.D. 

Universitv  Professor  of  Anatomy  and  Chirurgery. — Andrew  Francis 

Dixon,  M.B.,  Sc.D. 
University  Professor  of  Chemistry. — Sydney  Young,  Sc.D.,  F.R.S. 
University  Professor  of  Botany. — Henry  H.  Dixon,  Sc.D.,  F.R.S. 
Erasmus  Smith's  Professor  of  Natural  Philosophy. — William  E.  Thrift, 

M.A.,  F.T.C.D. 
Professor  of  Surgery. — Tliomas  Eagleson  Gordon,  M.B. 
University  Anatomist. — Cecil  M'Laren  West,  M.B.,  M.C. 
Professor  of  Zoology  and  Comvarative  Anatomy. — J .  Bronte  Gatenby, 

D.Sc,  D.Phil. 
Professor  of  Bacteriology. — Adrian  Stokes,  M.D. 
King's  Prof essor  of  Practice  of  Medicine. — Sir  James  Craig,  M.D. 
King's  Professor  of  Materia  Medica  and  Pharmacy. — Thomas  G.  Moor- 
head,  M.D. 
King's    Professor    of  Institutes    of   Medicine    \_Physiology'\. — Harold 

Pringle,  M.D. 
King's  Professor  of  Midwifery. — T.  Henry  Wilson,  M.A. 
Lecturer  in  Medical  Jurisprudence  and  Hygiene. — Henry  T.  Bewley, 

M.D. 
Lecturer  in  Pai!Ao%y— Alexander  C.  O'Sullivan,  M.D.,  S.F.T.C.D. 
Honorary  Professor  of  Laryngology  and    Otology. — Sir  Robert  Henry 

Woods,  M.B.,  M.Ch. 
Honorary  Professor  of  Dermatology. — Wallace  Beatty,  M.D. 
Lecturer  in  Organic  Chemistry. — Professor  Emil  A.  Werner,  M.A.,  Sc.D. 
Lecturer  in  Applied  Anatomy. — A.  A.  M'Connell,  M.B. 
Lecturers  in  jjental  Surgery  and  Pathology. — A.  W.  W.  Baker,  M.D., 

M.Dent.  Sc. ;  [Vacant.] 
Lecturer  in  Dental  Mechanics. — Joseph  Cockhurr,  L.D.S. 
Lecturer  in  Orthodontia. — E.  Sheldon  Friel,  M.  Dent.  Sc. 
L'ecturer  in  Ancesthetics . — T.  Percy  C.  Kirkpatrick,  M.D. 
Examiner  in  Clinical  Surgery. — Sir  Cuthbert  S.  Wallace,  K.C.M.G.,C.B. 
Examiner  in  Ophthalmic  Surgery. — Professor  L.  Werner,  M.B. 
Examiner  in  Midwifery. — Louis  L.  Cassidy,  M.B. 
Examiners  in  Medicine. — Professor  J.  A.  Lindsay,  M.D. ;  W.  Boxwell, 

M.D. 


240  SCHOOL  OF  PHYSIC. 

Examiner  in  Vital  Statistics. — N.  M'l.  Falkiner,  M.D. 

Examiner  in  Sanitary  Engineering. — P.  C.  Cowan,  Sc.D. 

Examtner  in  Mental  Diseases — J.  O'C.  Donelan,  L.R  C.P.  &  S.I. 

Examiner  in  Pathology. — Professor  W.  St.  Clair  Symniers,  M.B. 

Examiner  in  Anatomy. — Professor  J.  K.  Jainieson,  M.B. 

Examiner  in  Institutes  of  Medicine. — Professor  P.  T.  Hemng,  M.D. 

Examiner  iti  Medical  Jurisprudence  and  Hygiene. — E,.  J.  Eowlette 
M.D.  ' 

Examiner  in  Materia  Medica  and  T/ierapeiitics.  —  'N.  M'l.  Falkiner,  M.D. 

Examiner  in  Dental  Surgery  and  Pathology. — George  P.  Moore,  M.D. 

Director  of  Museum  of  Zoology  and  Comparative  Anatomy.— J,  Bronte 
Gateoby,  D.Sc,  D.Phil. 

Ourator  of  PathoUgical  Museum. — Thomas  E.  Gordon,  M.B. 

Curator  of  Materia  Medica  Museum. — T.  G.  Moorhead,  M.D. 

Chief  Demonstrator  in  Anatomy. — Cecil  McLaren  "West,  M.B.,  M.C. 

Assistant  to  Professor  of  Chemistry. — W.  C.  Eamsden,  F.C.S. 

Assistant  to  Professor  of  Institutes  of  Medicine. — William  E..  Fearon, 
Sc.D.,  F.T.C.D. 

Assistant  to  Lecturer  in  Pathology. — J.  T.  "Wigham,  M.D. 

Demonstrator  in  Rontgen  Photography . — T.  G.  Hardman,  M.D. 

Assistant  to  Professor  of  Botany. — Nigel  G.  Ball,  M.A.,  with  Demon- 
strators. 

Assistant  to  Professor  of  Surgery. — William  Pearson,  M.D. 


Registrar  of  the  School  of  Physic— A..  C.  O'Sullivan,  M.D.,  S. F.T.C.D, 

Assistant  Registrar. — George  L.  Allen. 

Registbae's  Office. 

The  Office  will  be  open  during  the  Medical  year  from  10  a.m. 
to  1  P.M.,  and  from  2  to  4  p.m.  daily,  except  on  Saturdays. 
The  Office  is  closed  during  the  Christmas  and  Easter  Vacations, 
and  for  the  Summer  Vacation  about  12th  July. 

MATKICULATIOK. 

Students  cannot  be  permitted  to  enter  for  or  attend  any  of 
the  Courses  of  Instruction  in  the  School  of  Physic  until  they 
have  Matriculated  by  paying  the  Matiiculation  Fee  of  Five 
Shillings.  It  is  not  necessary  for  Students  to  have  their  names  on 
the  College  Books,  or  to  attend  any  of  the  Academical  duties  of 
the  University,  unconnected  with  the  School  of  Physic,  unless 
they  desire  to  obtain  the  Degrees  or  Licenses  in  Medicine,  Surgery 
and  Midwifery,  or  a  Degree  in  Dental  Science  of  the  University 
of  Dublin. 

Students  may  matriculate  at  the  commencement  of  either  the 
Winter  or  the'  Summer  Session.  The  Winter  Session  com- 
mences on  October  2nd,  1922,  and  the  Summer  Session  on  April 
9th,  1923. 


SCHOOL   OF   PHYSIC.  241 


WOMEN   STPDENTS. 

Women  Students  are  admitted  to  the  Degrees  and  Diplomas  in 
Medicine,  Surgery,  and  Midwifery,  on  the  same  conditions  as 
men,  except  that  they  are  not  permitted  to  study  Anatomy  or 
Physiology  or  to  attend  Hospital  until  they  have  readied  the  age 
of  18  years.  A  special  Anatomical  Department,  with  dissecting- 
room  and  reading-room,  is  provided  for  their  accommodation. 


WINTER   SESSION,  1922-1923. 

The  Winter  Session  commences  on  the  2ud  October  by  the 
opening  of  the  Dissecting-rooms,  and  terminates  on  the  10th 
March.     Lectures  commence  on  th^  9th  October. 

Students  in  each  year,  iiicludiny  the  Jinal  years,  are  required 
to  enter  their  names  and  addresses  at  the  Office  of  the  Registrar 
of  the  School  of  Physic  at  the  heyinniny  of  the  Winter  Session. 
Students  who  fail  to  observe  this  rule,  and  jiermit  their  names  to  yo 
off  the  books  of  the  Medical  School,  are  required  to  pay  a  re-entry 
fee  of  Jive  shillings, 

LECTURES  AND   PltACTlCAL    1N8TR0CTI0N. 

Mechanics. — Lectures  for  Freshman  First  Year  Medical 
Students  (see  page  247). 

Physics. — Prof essor  Thrift,  at  1  o'clock,  on  Mondays,  Wednes- 
days, and  Fridays. 

Chemistry. — Professor  Young,  at  1  o'clock,  on  Tuesdays  and 
Thursdays,  and  at  9.30  o'clock  on  Saturdays. 

Practical  Chemistry. — Professor  Young,  at  10.30  o'clock,  on 
Saturdays. 

Organic  Chemistry  (Second  Year  Students). — Professor  Werner, 
at  1 1  o'clock,  on  Mondays  and  Fridays  during  October,  November, 
and  December. 

Chemistry  for  Dijilotna  in  Public  Health,  see  special  prospectus. 

Systematic  Ariatomy. — Professor  A.  F.  Dixon,  at  9  o'clock, 
on  Mondays,  Wednesdays,  and  Fridays. 

Descrij)tive  Anatomy  (1st  year). — Professor  A.  F.  Dixon,  at 
9  o'clock  on  Tuesdays  and  Thursdays. 

Descriptive  Anatomy  (2nd  year). — Professor  A.  F.  Dixon,  at 
12  o'clock  on  Tuesdays,  Wednesdays,  and  Thursdays. 

Physiology  (Junior  Class). — Professor  Pringle  and  Dr.  W.  R. 
Fearon,  at  11  o'clock  on  Tuesdays,  Wednesdays,  and  Thursdays. 

Physiology  (Senior  Class). — Professor  Pringle,  at  12  o'clock, 
on  Mondays  and  Fridays. 


242  SCHOOL   OF   PHYSIC. 

Surgery Professor  Gordon,  at  12  o'clock,  on  Tuesdays  and 

Thursdays. 

A  Course  of  lectures  on  Surgery,  for  fifth  j  ear  students,  will  be 
given  on  Saturdays  at  12  noon  by  the  Professor  of  Surgery  and 
other  lecturers.     No  fee  will  be  charged  for  this  Course. 

Applied  Anatomy. — Professor  A.  F.  Dixon  and  Mr.  A.  A. 
McConnell,  at  2  o'clock,  on  Mondays,  Wednesdays,  and  Fridays. 

Practice  of  Medicine, — Professor  Sir  James  Craig,  at  12o'clock, 
on  Mondays,  Wednesdays,  and  Fridays. 

Midwifery, — Professor  Wilson,  at  1  o'clock,  on  Mondays, 
Wednesdays,  and    Fridays. 

Pathology, — Dr.  O'SuUivan,  at  2  o'clock  on  Tuesdays  and 
Thursdays,  and  at  1 1  o'clock  on  Saturdays. 

Bacteriology  and  Pathology  for  JJiploma  in  Public  Health, 
see  special  prospectus. 

Practical  Physiology  (Division  I.). — Professor  Pringle  and 
Assistants,  2  to  4  o'clock,  on  Mondays  and  P'ridays. 

Practical  Physiology  (Division  II.). — Professor  Pringle  and 
Assistants,  2  to  4  o'clock,  on  Tuesdays  and  Thursdays. 

Dissections, — Six  months  are  required,  from  October  to  March 
inclusive. 

Christmas  Vacation  commences  on  16th  December,  and 
terminates  on  6th  January.  Lectures  rc-comraence  on  9tli 
January. 

DEPAKTMKNT   OF    ANATOMY. 

During  the  Winter  Sessio7i, — Students  in  their  first  year  attend 
liCctures  in  Anatomy  at  9  o'clock  daily  :  Students  in  their  second 
year  attend  Lectures  on  Tuesdays,  Wednesdays,  and  Thursdays, 
at  12  o'clock  ;  and  Students  in  their  third  year  attend  Lectures  on 
Mondays,  Wednesdays,  and  Fridays,  at  2  o'clock.  The  Lectures 
of  the  third  year  are  on  Applied  Anatomy,  and  are  undertaken 
mainly  by  Mr.  A.  A.  McConnell. 

The  Dissecting-room  is  subject  to  the  following  liules,  ordered 
by  the  Board:  — 

I.  The  Official  Hours  for  Dissections  are  from  10  a.  m.  to  .5  p.m., 
during  which  time  assistance  and  instruction  are  afforded  to  Students 
dissecting. 

XL  Students  are  allowed  to  dissect  before  10  a..m..  if  they  please, 
and,  to  facilitate  such  Dissections,  the  Gate  leading  into  the  College 
Park  shall  be  opened  at  7  o'clock,  a.m.,  except  during  December  and 
January,  when  it  shall  be  opened  at  8  o'clock.  (Demonstrator-s 
attend  from  10  a.m.  to  5  p.m.) 

in.  The  Professor  of  Anatomy  shall  attend  at  the  Anatomical  School 
during  two  hours  each  day,  including  the  hour  of  Lecture. 

IV.  One  or  more  off  the  Demonstrators  shall  attend  during  OflBr.isl 
Hours  for  Dissections. 


J 


SCHOOL   OF   PHISIC.  243 

During  the  Summer  Session  the  Dissecting-room  will  be  open 
from  8  o'clock,  a.m.,  to  5  o'clook,  p.m.  Demonstrations  on  Topo- 
graphical Anatomy  will  be  given  twice  daily. 

A  Special  Class  in  Embryology  is  held  for  Students  who  are 
preparing  for  Moderatorship. 

DEPARTMENT  OF  CHEMISTKT. 

The  Class  attending  the  Professor's  Winter  Lectures  work  in 
the  Chemical  Laboratory  on  each  Saturday  morning  at  10  o'clock. 

The  practical  work  includes  the  Preparation  of  Gases  and 
other  Inorganic  Substances  and  Qualitative  Analysis. 

Students  are  provided  with  full  sets  of  Apparatus  and  Tests. 

Students  requiring  Laboratory  Practice  in  special  branches  of 
Chemistry  are  admitted  for  either  one,  three,  six,  or  nine  months. 
For  further  information  application  should  be  made  to  the 
Professor  of  Chemistry. 

DEPABTMENT    OK   PHY8I0L0GV. 

Two  Courses  of  Lectures  are  required ;  one  in  the  second,  the 
other  in  the  third,  Winter  Session. 

Practical  Physiology. — Students  of  the  second  year  are  required 
to  attend  Laboratory  Courses  of  Instruction  in  Experimental 
Physiology,  and  in  Physiological  Chemistry,  consisting  of  at  least 
twenty  lessons  of  two  hours'  duration.  The  combined  fee  for 
these  Courses  is  £2  2s.    Re- attendance  on  either  section,  £1  1«. 

Research  Work. — To  encourage  the  prosecution  of  original 
investigation  into  I'hysiological  Subjects  having  a  practical 
bearing  on  Clinical  Medicine,  Graduates  in  Medicine  will  be 
given  every  facility  by  the  Professor,  and  will  be  charged  no  fee 
beyond  what  may  be  required  to  cover  cost  of  materials. 

DEPARTMENT   OF  PATHOLOGY    AND    BACTEKIOLOGT. 

Two  Courses  of  Lectures  are  given.  In  the  Winter  Session  the 
Lectures  on  Pathology  and  practical  work  on  the  subjects  of  the 
Lectures  take  place  in  combination,  one  hour  being  given  to  the 
Lecture  and  one  iiour  to  practical  work. 

In  the  summer  a  Course  in  Bacteriology  is  given,  including 
short  Lectures  and  practical  work. 

Students  are  supplied  with  all  necessaries. 

Two  Courses  in  advanced  Bacteriology  are  given  in  the  year, 
intended  specially  for  Candidates  for  the  Diploma  in  Public 
Health.  Graduates  in  Medicine  who  are  not  taking  out  the 
Diploma  are  admitted  to  these  Courses.  Graduates  in  Medicine 
who  are  desirous  of  engaging  in  research  in  Pathology  and 
Bacteriology  are  given  all  facilities,  and  are  supplied  with  such 
material  as  they  require  and  is  available. 

M  2 


244  SCHOOL   OF    PHYSIC. 


SUMMER  SESSION,  1923. 

The  Summer  Session  commences  on  the  9th  April,  and  ter- 
minates on  the  23rd  June. 


LECXFKES    AND    PEAOTICAL  INSTKUCTIOK. 

Laboratory  Instruction  in  Chemistry. — Professor  Young. 

This  Course  comprises  Quantitative  Chemical  Analysis  and 
the  identification  of  typical  organic  compounds.  Students 
work  in  the  Laboratory  from  2  to  4  o'clock  on  Tuesdays 
and  Thursdays.  Each  Student  is  provided  with  full  sets  of 
Apparatus  and  Tests. 

Chemistry  for  Diploma  in  Public  Health,  see  special  prospectus. 
Laboratory  Instruction  in  Histology. — Professor  Piingle. 
This  Course  is  given  in   the   Physiological  Laboratory,   on 
Mondays,  Wednesdays,  and   Fridays,  from  2  to  4  o'clock.     A 
Lecture  is  also  given  in  the  Theatre,  on  one  day  in  each  week, 
after  which  Illustrative  Preparations  are  shown.     Students  have 
their  own  places  in  the  Laboratory,  each  provided  with  a  Micro- 
scope, and  a  full  set  of  Apparatus  and  Reagents.    The  Laboratory 
is  open  to  Members  of  the  Class  daily,  from  10  to  5  o'clock. 
Demonstratio7is  in  Operative  Surgery. — Professor  Gordon. 
The  Course  of  Operations  will  be  given  during  the  months  of 
April  and  May,  at  8.30  o'clock,  a.m.,  on  Mondays,  Wednesdays, 
and  Fridays,  and  at  11  o'clock,  a.m.,  on  Tuesdays,  Thursdays, 
and  Saturdays. 

Bacteriology. — From  2  to  4  o'clock,  on  Mondays,  Tuesdays, 
and  Thursdays. 

The  Course  will  be  given  in  the  Pathological  Laboratory. 
Students  will  have  places  allotted  to  them,  with  Microscopes  and 
the  necessary  Apparatus.  The  Laboratory  will  be  open  to  Members 
of  the  Class  from  10  to  1  o'clock  daily. 

Pathology  and  Bacteriology  for  Diploma  in  Public  Health, 
see  special  prospectus. 

^o^awy. —Professor  H.  H.  Dixon,  Lectures  and  Practical  work, 
9  to  11  o'clock  on  Tuesdays,  Thursdays,  and  Saturdays,  in  the 
School  of  Botany.  Students  are  provided  with  microscopes,  re- 
agents, and  specimens,  but  are  required  to  bring  their  own 
dissecting  instruments. 

Zoology  Lectures. — Professor  Gatenby,  at  10  o'clock  on 
Mondays,  Wednesdays,  and  Fridays. 

Practical  Zoology. — Professor  Gatenby. 

In  the  Zoological  Laboratory.  The  Class  will  work  from  2  to 
4.30  o'clock  on  Mondays  and  Fridays.   Students  will  be  provided 


SCHOOL  OF  PHTSIC.  246 

with  Microscopes,  Reagents,  and  Specimens,  but  must  bring  their 
own  Dissecting  Instruments. 

Materia  Medica Professor  T.  G.  Moorhead,  at  12  o'clock  on 

Mondays.  Tuesdays,  Wednesdays,   and  Thursdays. 

Medical  Jurisprudence  and  Ilyijiene. — Dr.  Bewlej',  at  1  o'clock 
on  Mondays,  Wednesdays,  Thursdays,  and  Fridays. 

Dental  Anaioviy. —Vrokssor  A.  F.  Dixon  and  Mr.  E.  S.  Friel. 
Lectures  and  Practical  Work,  9  to  11  o'clock  on  Tuesdays  and 
Thursdays. 

Anatomy. — An  optional  Course  of  Dissections  and  Demonstra- 
tions is  given  during  the  Summer  Session,  for  which  a  fee  of 
£2  2s.  is  charged. 

Physiology. — A  Special  Voluntary  Course  of  Advanced  Chemical 
Physiologj'  is  given  during  the  Summer  Session.     Fee,  £2  2«. 

PRACTICAL  PIIAKMACy. 

A  Course  of  Demonstrations  in  Practical  Pharmacy  is  given  by 
the  Professor  of  Materia  Medica  in  the  Museum  of  Materia  Medica 
during  the  Summer  Session.  Each  Student  works  at  a  separate 
compartment,  and  is  provided  with  the  necessary  Apparatus  and 
Reagents.     The  Course  is  open  to  Extern  Students. 

RADIOLOGY. 

An'optional  Course  of  Demonstrations  in  the  Diagnostics  and 
Therapy  of  the  Rontgen  Ray  will  be  given  in  the  Hilary  Term . 
The  Course  will  include  practical  work  with  patients.  Certi- 
ficates will  be  issued  to  students  who  attend  diligently.  Fee  for 
the  Course,  £5  os. 


DEGRICES,  LICENSES,  AND  DIPLOMAS. 

The  Qualifications  in  Medicine,  Surgery,  Midwifery,  Dental 
Science,  and  Public  Health  granted  by  the  University  are  as 
follow: —     • 


The  Degrees  are: — 

1.  Bachelor  in  Medicine  (M.B.). 

1.  Bachelor  in  Surgery  (B.Ch.). 

3.  Bachelor  in  Obstetric  Science 
(B.A.O.). 

4.  Doctor  in  Medicine  (M.D.). 
o.   Master  in  Surgery  (M.Ch.). 

Tlie  Licenses  and  Diplomas  are:  — 

1.  License  in  Medicine. 

2.  License  in  Surgery. 

3.  License  in  Obstetric  Science. 


Master  in  Obstetric  Science 
(M.A.O  ). 

Bachelor   in   Dental  Science 
(B.Dent.Sc). 

Master    in    Dental    Science 
(M.Dent.Sc). 


4.  Diploma  in  Gynaecology  and 
Obstetrics. 

5.  Dinloma  in  Public  Health.* 


Formerly  Qualification  in  State  iStedicine. 


246  SCHOOL   OF    PHYSIC. 

KKGULATIONS  FOR  OBTAINING  MKDICAL  DEGKKEiS. 
Before  obtaiuing  the  Degrees  of  Bachelor  in  Medicine,  Surgerj', 
and  Midwifery  candidates  must  have  completed  the  course"  lor  the 
Arts  Degree  (B.A.)  of  the  University,  and  have  devoted  at  least 
five  years  to  medical  study.  The  Arts  and  Medical  Courses  may 
be  taken  se{)arately  or  concurrently.  The  privileges  in  Arts 
granted  to  Medical  Students  are  stated  on  pages  265-26S. 

Entrance  to  the  Medical  School. 

In  order  to  join  the  Medical  School  and  prepare  for  the  Medical 
Degrees  of  the  University,  a  student  must  pass  the  Entrance 
Examination  to  Trinity  College  and  a  Special  Preliminary  Exam- 
ination in  Arts,  or  some  examination  recognized  as  equivalent. 

The  Course  for  the  Entrance  Examination  is  given  on  page  31. 

The  Course  for  the  Special  Preliminary  Examination  in  Arts 
is  the  same  as  that  for  the  Junior  Freshman  Hilary  Examination, 
see  page  49. 

For  dates  of  Examinations  see  page  27!'. 

The  Entrance  and  Special  Preliminary  Examinations  may  be 
taken  consecutively. 

If  credit  for  the  above  Examinations  has  been  obtained,  or  any 
Term  Examination  passed,  the  Medical  Course  may  be  commenced 
at  the  beginning  of  October  or  in  April. 

A  similar  privilege  is  granted  to  students  who  obtain  marks 
showing  sufficient  merit  at  the  Examination  for  Junior  Exhibitions. 

A  Special  Entrance  Examination  to  Trinity  College  and  a 
Special  Preliminary  Examination  in  Arts  are  held  in  October 
and  in  March  in  each  year.  Students  who  pass  these  examina- 
tions may  begin  their  Medical  or  Dental  Course  in  October  or 
April.     Tiie  dates  for  1922-23  are  given  on  page  279 

In  the  case  of  students  who  take  their  Medical  and  Arts  Courses 
concurrently  the  Arts  lectures  are  delivered  during  the  Summer 
Session  of  each  of  the  first  four  years  of  the  combined  Medical 
and  Arts  Course.  The  total  Arts  fees,  including  the  Degree  fee, 
amount  to  £101.  The  Arts  Regulations  for  Medical  Students 
will  be  found  on  pages  265-268. 

A  Student  who  enters  after  1st  January,  1923,  cannot  be 
registered  as  a  Medical  Student  with  the  General  Medical 
Council  until  he  has  passed  an  Examination  in  Physics  and 
Chemistry  recognized  by  the  University  of  Dublin. 

Medical  Course. 
For  Students  who  enter  before  1st  January,  1923.* 

Students  who  produce  evidence  of  having  passed  the  Special 
Preliminary  Examination  in  Arts,  or  its  equivalent  (see  above), 
may  enter  their  names  and  addresses  at  the  office  of  the  Medical 


•  For  Students  who  enter  after  ist  January,  1923,  the  curriculum  may  be  mod 
fied.    Details  will  be  published  in  due  course. 


J 


SCHOOL  OF   I'HYSIC.  247 

Scliool,  pay  the  Matriculatiou  Fee  of  os.,  and  proceed  with  the 
foUowinj^  Courses  and  Examinations: — 
First  Year.— 

First  Winter''^ — 

Chemistry  Lectures  and  Laboratory, 
Physics  and  Mechanics  Lectures,  . . 
Practical  Physics,     . . 
Systematic  Anatomy  Lectures, 
Descriptive  Anatomy  Lectures, 
Dissections,  , . 
♦ 

£14   14     0 
Preliminary  Scientific  Examination  in  Experimental  Physics. 

First  Summer — 

Botany,  Lectures  and  Practical,  ..  £1  11  6 
Zoology,  Lectures  and  Practical,  . .  2  2  0 
Practical  Chemistry,  i-  ..  ..  2     2     0 

£5  15  6 
In  connexion  with  the  course  in  Physics  a  course  of  Lectures  in 
3Iec}utnics,  of  a  Physical  rather  than  of  a  3Iuthenuttical  character, 
is  delivered  between  the  \Oth  of  October  and  the  iih  of  November. 
Students  should  take  cure  to  obtain  credit  fur  attendance  on  these 
Lectures,  Failure  to  do  so  will  prevent  their  obtaining  credit  for 
Lectures  iti  Physics,  und  entering  for  the  Preliminary  Scientific 
Examination  in  that  subject. 

Completion  of  Preliminary  Scientific  Examination  in  [a]  Botany, 
Zoology,  and  (A)  Chemistry. 

All  the  subjects  may  be  passed  at  the  same  time,  or  they  may 
be  passed  in  two  groups  («)  and  (6). 

Before  presenting  themselves  for  Examination,  Students 
must  have  attended  the  recognized  Courses  of  Instruction  in  the 
subjects  of  the  Examination. 

N.B. —  Tlie  Courses  of  the  Second  Year  cannot  be  commenced 
until  the  student  has  passed  at  least  two  of  i he  Jour  subjects  of  the 
Preliminari/  Scientijic  Medical  Examination. 

Second  Year.— 

Second  Winter — 

Anatomy  Lectures,   . .  . .         . .      £3     3     0 

Physiology  and  Organic  Chemistry 

Lectures,   . . 
Practical  Physiology, 
Dissections,   . . 
Hospital  Elementary  Instruclion,"= 

£26     5     0 


3 

3 

0 

2 

2 

0 

5 

5 

0 

12 

12 

0 

'  In  tlie  Table  of  Fees  here  given  the  reductions  specified  (p.  266)  have  already  been 
miue. 

"Students  who  join  the  School  in  a  Summer  Session  must  consult  the  Professor  of 
Clwmistry  before  onterinc  for  this  Course. 

«  Hosuical  attendance  cannot  be  commenced  until  the  student  niis  obtained  credit 
forsi.x  months'  dissections,  and  completed  the  i'reliniinarv  .Scientific  Examination. 


2^ft  SCHOOL  OP  PHrsic. 

Second  Summer — 

Histology,  ..         ..         ..  ..         £-5     5     0 

Intermediate  Medical  Examination,  Part  I. 

The  subjects  are — (1)  Anatomy,  and  (2)  Histology,  Physiology 
(omitting  the  Physiology  of  the  Sense-Organs,  and  of  the  Central 
Nervous  System),  and  Organic  Chemistry. 

Before  presenting  themselves  for  this  Examination,  Students 
must  have  attended  the  School  Courses  of  Instruction  prescribed 
for  the  First  and  Second  years  of  Medical  study,  and  must  have 
completed  the  Preliminary  Scienlijic  Exainination  m  liotany, 
Zoology,    Chemistry,  and  Physics. 

The  Examination  will  consist  of  a  paper,  a  practical,  and  an 
oral  in  each  subject,  except  Organic  Chemistry,  in  which  there  is 
no  oral  or  practical  examination. 

N.B, —  The  courses  of  the  Third  Year  cunnot  he  commenced 
until  the  Preliminary  Scientific  Examinalion  has  been  completed. 

Third  Year.— 

Third  Winter— 

Applied  Anatomy  Lectures,'' 
Physiology  Lectures, 
Pathology,  Lectures  and  Practical, '^ 
Hospital  Practice,     . . 


Intermediate  Medical  Examination,  Fart  II. 

The  subjects  are — Applied  Anatomy  and  Applied  Physiology 
(including  the  Physiology  of  the  Nervous  System  and  of  the 
Sense-Organs). 

Before  presenting  themselves  for  this  Examination  Students 
must  have  attended  the  prescribed  Courses  of  study,  and  have 
completed  Intermediate  Medical  Examination,  Part  I. 

The  Examination  will  consist  of  a  paper  and  an  oral  in  each 
subject. 

Third  Summer — 

Materia  Medica  and  Therapeutics,''       . .  £3  3  0 

Medical  Jurisprudence  and  Hygiene,**  3  3  0 

Bacteriology,  Lectures  and  Practical,''  5  5  0 

£11  11     0 

*  Students  who  have  credit  for  two  years'  dissectious  in  Trinity  College  will  be 
allowed  to  dissect  in  their  third  or  subsequent  year  on  payment  of  £o  is.  for  the 
Winter  Session. 

*  These  Courses  may  be  taken  by  those  Students  only  who  liave  completed 
the  Intermediate  Medical  Examination,  Part  1. 


£3 

3 

0 

3 

3 

0 

5 

5 

0 

12 

12 

0 

£24 

3 

0 

£3 

3 

0 

3 

3 

0 

2 

2 

0 

12 

12 

0 

£21 

0 

0 

£2 

12 

6 

SCHOOL   OP   PHYSIC.  249 

N.B. — The  Courses  of  the  Fourth  Year  cannot  be  covnnenced 
until  the  Intermediate  Medical  Examitiaiion,  Part  I.,  has  been 
completed. 

Fourth  Year.— 

Fourth  Winter — 

Practice  of  Medicine, 
Midwifery,     .. 

Surgery,         

Hospital  Practice,    . . 

Fourth  Summer — 

Operative  Surgery,    . . 

Final  Medical  Ezamination,-  Part  I. 

The  subjects  are — Pathology  and  Bacteriologj',  Materia  Medica 
and  Therapeutics,  Medical  Jurisprudence  and  Hygiene. 

Before  they  are  admitted  to  the  lixaraination,  Students  must 
have  attended  the  prescribed  Courses  of  study  and  passed 
the  Intermediate  Medical  Examination,  Part  II. 

Vaccination  (Fee,  £1  Is.)  should  be  taken  out  in  the  fourth 
year. 

Fifth  Year- 
Practical  Midwifery,  £10  10  0 

Mental  Disease,    . .  . .         , .         . .  3     3  0 

Ophthalmic  Surgery,  . .          . .          . .  3     3  0 

£16  16     0 
Final  Medical  Ezamination,  Fart  II. 

The  subjects  are — («)  Medicine,  Clinical  Medicine,  and  Mental 
Disease  ;  [b)  Surgery,  Clinical  Surgery,  Surgical  Operations,  and 
Ophthalmic  Surgery;    (c)  Midwifery  and  Gynaecology. 

Before  they  are  admitted  to  any  part  of  this  Examination 
Students  must  have  passed  the  Final  Medioal  Examination, 
Part  I. 

Students  may  enter  for  Examination  in  (c)  in  their  Fifth  Year 
if  they  have  obtained  credit  for  twenty-one  months'  hospital 
attendance. 

They  may  enter  for  Examination  in  either  of  the  other  groups, 
but  not  both,  when  they  have  obtained  credit  for  twenty-four 
raontlis'  hospital  attendance. 

The  remaining  group  cannot  be  passed  until  the  end  of  the 
Fifth  Year,  and  when  credit  has  been  obtained  for  twenty-seven 
months'  hospital  attendance.  Before  preserving  themselves  for 
any  of  these  groups,  Students  must  have  attended  all  the  pre- 
scribed Courses  of  Instruction  in  the  subjects  in  which  they 
present  themselves  for  Examination. 

M  3 


£73  10 

0 

00  13 

0 

17     0 

0 

250  SCHOOL  OF  PHYSIC. 

Degrees. 

Candidates  wlio  have  completed  the  prescribed  Courses  of  studv 
and  passed  all  the  Examinations,  will  be  entitled,  if  Graduate's 
in  Arts,  to  have  conferred  on  them  the  Degrees  of  M. B.,  B.Ch., 
B.A.O.,  on  payment  to  the  Senior  Proctor  of  the  Degree  Fees 
amounting  to  £17.  They  will  also  obtain  from  the  Senior  Proctor 
a  Diploma  entitling  them  to  be  entered  on  the  Register  of  Medical 
Practitioners  under  the  Medical  Act,  1S86. 

TOTAL   EXPENSES   OF   FOUEGOING   COURSES. 
I.  Lectures,     . . 
II.  Hospitals,  .. 
III.  Degrees  (M.B.,  B.Ch.,  B.A.O.), 

Total,         £146     3     0 

License  in  Medicine,  Surgery,  and  Obstetric  Science. 

Candidates  for  the  License  in  Medicine,  Surgery,  and 
Obstetric  Science  must  have  completed  two  years  in  Arts,  and 
live  years  in  Medical  Studies. 

The  dates,  regulations,  and  subjects  of  Examination  are  the 
same  as  for  the  Degrees. 

The  Fee  for  the  License  is  £11. 

Licentiates  on  completing  the  Course  in  Arts,  and  proceeding 
to  the  Degree  of  H.A.,  may  be  admitted  to  the  Degree  of  Bachelor 
on  paying  £6,  the  difference  between  the  Degree  Fees  and  the 
Fee  for  the  License. 

The  Fee  for  the  License  is  payable  to  the  Setiior  Proctor. 

ENTRIES  FOR  COURSES  AND  PAYMENT   OF  FEES. 

Winter  Session. 

Entries  for  the  classes  of  the  Winter  Session,  1922-1923,  will 
be  taken  on  and  after  18th  September,  and  will  close  on  30th 
September.  Seats  in  the  Lecture  Theatres  will  be  allotted  in  the 
order  in  which  entries  are  received.  Jintries  will  be  taken  on  the 
prescribed  entry  form  only,  and  when  received  by  post  will  take 
precedence  from  their  delivery  at  tlie  Registrar's  Office.  Fees 
are  not  to  be  sent  with  entry  forms.  Students  not  resident  in 
Dublin  should  obtain  entry  forms  before  proceeding  on  vacation, 
and  should,  at  that  time,  obtain  such  information  as  they  require 
on  the  subject  of  classes  and  entry. 

Fees  should  be  paid  from  9th  to  14th  October  inclusive,  after 
which  a  Tardy  Fee  of  2fi,  6d.  for  each  working  day  in  arrear  will 
be  charged  up  to  a  maximum  of  six  days.  Students  whose  fees 
are  not  paid  by  21st  October  will  not  be  given  credit  for  the 
classes.  Cheques  should  be  drawn  for  the  actual  amount  due, 
and  made  payable  to  "  the  Registrar  of  the  School  of  Physic." 
Hospital  fees  should  not  be  included. 


SCHOOL  OP  PHYSld.  25i 

Summer  Session, 

tlntries  for  the  classes  of  the  Summer  Session,  1923,  will  be 
taken  on  and  after  19th  March,  and  will  close  on  31st  March. 
Tlie  rules  for  entry  are  the  same  as  for  the  Winter  Session. 

Fees  should  be  paid  from  9th  to  14th  April  inclusive,  after 
which  a  Tardy  Fee  of  2s.  6ti.  for  each  working  day  in  arrear  will 
be  charged  up  to  a  maximum  of  six  days.  Students  whose  fees 
are  not  paid  b)'  21st  April  will  not  be  given  credit  for  the  classes. 
Cheques  should  be  drawn  for  the  actual  amount  due,  and  made 
payable  to  "  the  liegistrar  of  the  School  of  Physic." 

KEGULATIONS  CONCERNiNGr   EXAMINATIONS. 

All  entries  for  Examinations  must  be  made  14  clear  days  before 
those  upon  which  tlie  various  Examinations  begin. 

The  following  regulations  hold  with  regard  to  the  number, 
times,  and  conduct  of  Examinations,  scale  of  marking,  &c. : — 

1.  The  Preliminary  Scientific  Examination  is  held  three  times 
in  each  year. 

Equal  marks  are  given  to  each  subject  and  to  each  group  of. 
subjects. 

2.  The  Intermediate  Examination  is  held  three  times  in  each 
year. 

Equal  marks  are  awarded  to  Anatomy,  and  to  Physiology, 
including  Histology  and  Or;;anic  Ciiemistry,  in  Part  I.,  and  to 
Applied  Anatomy  and  Applied  Physiology  in  Part  11.,  of  the 
Examination. 

S.  Part  I.  of  the  Final  Examination  is  held  three  times  in  each 
year. 

Scale  of  marking  is  as  follows  : — 


Pathology, 

. 

60 

Materia  Medic 

a  and  Theianeuties,  ...         25 

Medical  Jurisprudence  and  Hygiene,        .         .         25 

4.  Part  II.  of  the 

Final  Examination  is   held  three  times 

in 

each  year. 

Scale  of  marking  is 

as  follows: — 

Medicine — 

SUKOEKY — 

Paper, 

•24 

Paper, 
Oral, 

21 
15 

Oral, 

16 

Operations, 

14 

Clinical, 

40 

Clinical,      . 

50 

Ophthalmic  Surgery,  . 

10 

Mental  Disease,  . 

10 

MiDwiFEKY  &  Gynecology — 

Clinical,     . 

40 

Paper, 

40 

Orals, 

2C 

The  Examination  in  Mental  Disease  takes  the  form  of  an 
oral,  and  is  held  at  a  Mental  Hospital:  candidates  are  required 
to  till  up  a  form  of  certificate  (such  as  is  used  for  the  committal 


'25^ 


SCHOOL   OV   PHYSIC. 


of  a  lunatic  to  a  public  Mental  Hospital)   from  their  personal 
examination  of  a  patient. 

5.  Examiners  are  empowered,  in  assessing  marks,  to  take  into 
account  the  duly  attested  records  of  the  work  done  by  the  candi- 
dates throughout  tlie  course  of  study  in  the  subject  of  the 
examination. 

6.  The  Court  of  Examiners  have  the  power  of  compelling 
candidates  whose  answering  has  been  deficient  in  any  subject, 
to  attend  a  recognized  Course  of  Instruction  in  that  subject  before 
presenting  themselves  for  re-examination. 

7.  When  entering  for  the  Final  l<]xamination  in  Medicine 
Students  must  lodge  at  the  office  notes  of  six  medical  cases  taken 
by  them,  and  each  countersigned  by  the  Physician  in  charge  of  the 
case  ;  also  notes  of  six  autopsies  taken  by  them,  and  each  counter- 
signed by  the  Pathologist  cf  the  hospital. 

When  entering  for  the  Final  Examination  in  Surgery,  Students 
must  lodge  at  the  office  notes  of  six  surgical  cases  taken  by  theija, 
and  each  countersigned  by  the  Surgeon  in  charge  of  the  case. 

8.  Before  entering  for  ant/  of  the  three  sections  of  the  Final 
Medical  Examination,  Part  II,  the  Student  should  obtain  from 
the  Office  the  special  form  on  lohich  attendance  upon  the  various 
necessary  Courses  may  he  certijied  (see  page  254). 

KE-EXAMl  NATION. 

Every  Student,  who  liaving  entered  for  any  of  the  Medical 
Examinations,  fails,  for  any  reason,  to  obtain  credit  for  it,  shall 
pay  a  fee  of  10s.  6c?.,  for  any  occasion  on  which  he  presents  himself 
again  for  the  same  Examination. 

Every  Student  who  is  remitted  in  the  Final  Examinations  in 
Medicine  or  Surgery  «rill  be  required,  on  entering  for  re-examina- 
tion, to  present  six  additional  cases  taken  by  himself  and  each 
countersigned  by  the  Physician  or  Surgeon  in  charge  of  the  case. 

Every  Student  who  is  remitted  in  the  Final  Examination  in 
Midwifery  will  be  required,  on  entering  for  re-examination,  to 
produce  evidence  of  having  attended  clinical  instruction  in 
Midwifery  on  at  least  twenty-five  days  after  the  examination  at 
which  he  failed. 


REGULATIONS  CONCERNING  LECTURES,  HOSPITALS,  &c. 

ATTENDANCE   ON   LIXTUKES. 

Students  are  expected  to  attend  all  the  Lectures  or  Demon- 
strations delivered  in  6aeh  Course  for  which  they  enter,  whether 
in  the  Winter  or  the  Summer  Session ;  but  in  order  to  provide  for 
unavoidable  absence,  such  as  illness  or  attendance  at  Examina- 
tions, they  are  allowed  credit  for  a  Course  if  thej'  have  been 
present  at  three-fourths  of  the  Lectures  or  Demonstrations  actually 
delivered.  If  this  proportion  involve  a  fraction,  the  next  highest 
whole  number  is  reckoned  as  the  minimum.     If  more  than  one- 


; 


8Cp00t   OP   PHYSIC.  253 

fourth  have  been  missed,  application  must  be  made  thiouj,^h  the 
Committee  of  the  School  of  Pliysic  to  the  Board  of  Trinity  College, 
by  whom  each  case  is  decided  on  its  merits,  but  the  applicant 
must  produce  satisfactory  reasons  for  omission  of  all  the  Lectures 
missed,  not  of  the  excess  above  one-fourth  only.  No  Student  will 
be  allowed  credit  for  a  Course  who  has  not  been  found  diligent 
in  attendance,  when  not  prevented  by  illness  or  other  cause 
oou^dered  sufficient  by  the  Board. 

CLASS   KXAMINATIOKS. 

Students  will  be  required  to  show  a  reasonable  knowledge,  as 
ascertained  by  Examination  during  the  Session,  of  the  subject  of 
a  Course  of  Lectures  before  a  certificate  of  satisfactory  attendance 
is  issued  by  the  Professor  in  charge,  and  the  return  to  the  Senior 
Lecturer  is  to  include  a  statement  that  tliis  condition  has  been 
fulfilled. 

HOSPITAL   ATTENDANCE. 

Three  Courses  of  nine  months'  attendance  on  the  Clinical 
Lectures  of  Sir  Patrick  Dun's  or  other  Metropolitan  Hospital 
recognized  by  the  Board  of  Trinity  College  (see  page  277)  are 
required. 

During  the  first  three  months  of  the  Winter  Session  in  which 
Students  begin  their  Hospital  work,  they  must  attend  an 
Elementary  Course  of  Hospital  Instruction  for  one  hour  per  daj-. 

Students  will  be  required  to  attend  on  at  least  forty-five  occa- 
sions in  this  three  months'  Course  in  order  to  obtain  credit  for  it. 

Students  attending  Hospital  are  required,  at  the  end  of  each 
month,  to  lodge  at  the  Registrar's  Office,  in  the  Medical  School,  a 
card  which  has  been  signed  daily  during  the  month  by  some  member 
of  the  Hospital  Staif.  These  cards  may  be  obtained  at  the  Office  at 
the  School  of  Physic. 

The  tirst  Hospital  attendance  card  of  the  Academic  Year  must 
be  signed  by  the  Secretary  to  the  Medical  Board  of  the  Hospital 
attended  by  the  Student. 

No  Student  will  be  supplied  with  a  Hospital  attendance  card 
until  that  previously  supplied,  completed  as  required,  has  been 
handed  in. 

The  following  will  not  be  accepted  in  lieu  of  attendance  at 
Clinical  instruction  at  General  Hospitals  : — 

{a)  Attendance  at  Special  Hospitals. 

(6)  Attendance  at  courses  of  instruction  in  Vaccination. 

(c)  The  statement  that  a  student  is  reading  for  one  of  the 
Medical  or  Arts  Examinations. 

Hospital  attendance  cannot  be  commenced  until  the  Student 
has  obtained  credit  for  six  months'  dissections,  and  completed  the 
Preliminary  Scientific  Examination. 

Attendance  at  a  general  Hospital  during  the  months  of  July, 
August,  and  September,  cannot  be  counted  unless  the  Student  is 
resident  at  the  Hospital. 

Students  who  shall  have  diligently  attended  the  practice  of  a 


254  SCHOOL   OF   PHYSIC. 

recognized  London  or  Edinburgh  Hospital  for  one  year,  of  A 
recognized  County  Intirinary,or  of  a  recognized  Dominion  Hospital 
for  two  years  previous  to  the  commencement  of  their  Metropolitan 
Medical  Studies,  may  be  allowed,  on  special  application  to  the  Board 
of  Trinity  College,  to  count  the  period  so  spent  as  equivalent  to 
one  year  spent  in  a  recognized  Metropolitan  Hospital. 

CERTIFICATES. 
Students     entering    for    the    Final     Medical    Examination, 
Part  II,  are  required  to  present  the  followiug  certificates  :  — 

MEDICINE. 

PKACnCAL   VACCINATION. 

The  certificate  of  instruction  must  show  that  the  student  has 
attended  a  Course  of  instruction  in  Vaccination  in  accordance 
with  the  Regulations  of  the  Local  Government  Hoard.  The 
Certificate  should  be  signed  by  the  Medical  Officer  of  the  Vaccine 
Department,  Upper  Sackville-street,  Dublin,  the  Worivhouse 
Infirmary,  Cork,  or  the  Workhouse  Infirmary,  Belfast. 

MENTAL   DISEASK. 

A  Certificate  of  attendance  on  a  three  months'  Course  of 
Practical  Study  of  Mental  Disease  at  a  recognized  Institution  (see 
page  276)  is  required. 

SUKGERY. 

OPUTHAf.JllC   SURGERY. 

A  Certificate  of  regular  attendance  upon  a  three  montlis' 
Course  of  Ophthalmic  Surgery  is  required.  This  Certificate  must 
be  obtained  from  a  Hospital  in  which  at  least  twenty-tive  beds 
are  maintained  for  patients  suffering  from  diseases  of  the  Kye 
and  Ear,  and  must  state  that  the  Student's  work  in  connexion 
with  the  Course  has  reached  a  satisfactory  standard. 

ANESTHETICS, 

A  Certificate  of  adequate  practical  instruction  and  proficiency 
in  practice  in  the  administration  of  General  Anaesthetics  is 
required.  The  Certificate  must  be  signed  by  the  Autesthetist  to 
tlie  hospital  attended  by  the  Student,  and  countersigned  by  tlie 
Secretary  of  the  Medical  Board  of  the  Hospital.  ( 

MIDWIFERY. 

I.  Certificates  of  liaving,  before  commencing   the   study  of 

Practical  Midwifery,  held  tlie  office  of  («)  Clinical  Clerk 

and   (b)   Surgical    Dresser   in   a   recognised  general 

Hospital. 

II.  (a)  of  regular  attendance  at  a  recognised  Maternity  Hospital 

as  a  non-resident  student  for  a  period  of  six  months^ 

or  as  a  resident  student  for  a  period  of  three  months ; 

(6)  of  havingreceived practical  instruction  iuMidwifery ;  and 

(c)  of  having  personally  conducted  twenty  cases  of  labour 

under  official  medical  supervision. 


SCHOOL   OF   PHYSlCk  255 

HIGHER  DEGREES. 

Master  in  Obstetric  Science. 

M.A.O. 

A  Master  in  Obstetric  Science  must  be  a  B.  A.  0.  of  two 
years'  standing  in  the  University  of  Dublin,  and  must  produce 
satisfactory  evidence  of  having  been  engaged  for  two  years  in 
the  studj'  of  Obstetric  Science.  Hefore  the  Grace  of  the  house 
can  be  obtained,  the  Candidate  must  pass  the  M.  A.  0.  Ex- 
amination according  to  regulations  approved  by  the  Board. 

The  subjects  for  the  Examination  are : — 


1.  Practice  of  Midwifery. 

2.  Gynaecoiogy. 


3.  Anatomy  of  Female  Pelvis  and 
Elementary  Embryology . 

4.  Clinical  Gynaecology. 

Notice  should  be  given  to  the  Registrar  of  the  School  of  Physic 
one  month  before  the  hrst  day  of  the  Examination.  The  dates  are 
the  same  as  those  for  the  Final  Examination,  Part  II.,  Midwifery, 
page  280. 

Fee  for  the  M.A.O.  Examination  is  £5  and  for  the  Degree  of 
Master  in  Obstetric  Science,  £10. 


Master  in  Surgery. 

M.Ch. 

A  Master  of  Surgery  must  be  a  B.Ch.  of  the  University  of 
Dublin,  of  three  years'  standing,  and  must  produce  satisfactory 
evidence  of  having  been  engaged  for  not  less  than  two  years  from 
the  date  of  Registration  in  the  study  or  practice  of  his  profession. 
He  must  then  pass  an  Examination  in  the  following  subjects: — 


1.  Clinical  Surgery. 

2.  Operative  Surgery. 

3.  Surgical  Pathology. 


Surgery. 

Surgical  Anatomy  (on  the  dead 
subject). 


And  one  of  the  following  optional  subjects,  viz. : — 

1.  Surgery,  in  one  of  its  recognized  branches,  viz.  : 

Ophthalmic  and  Aural ;  Gynaecological ;  Dental. 

2.  Mental  Disease. 

3.  Medical  Jurisprudence  and  Hygiene. 

4.  Advanced  Anatomy  and  Physiology. 

5.  Comparative  Anatomy . 


256  SCHOOL  OP  PHYSIC. 

Notice  should  be  given  to  the  Registrar  of  the  School  of  Physic 
oue  month  before  the  Examination  begins,  the  optional  subject 
selected  being  named  at  the  same  time.  The  dates  are  the  same 
as  those  for  the  Final  Examination,  Part  II.,  Surgery,  page  280. 

Graduates  in  Surgery  of  the  University  of  Dublin,  oi  not  less 
than  ten  years'  standing,  may  be  recommended  for  the  Degree  of 
M.  Ch.,  by  the  vote  of  the  Court  of  Examiners,  on  such  Examina- 
tion as  they  shall  determine.  Candidates  claiming  this  privilege 
must  give'  one  month's  notice  to  the  Registrar  of  the  School, 
state  in  full  their  qualitications,  and  name  the  optional  subject 
selected. 

Fee  for  the  Examination,  £10,  and  for  the  Degree  of  Master 
in  Surgery,  £11. 

Doctor  in  Medicine. 

M.D. 

Candidates  for  the  Degree  of  Doctor  in  Medicine  must  have 
passed  the  Final  Examinations  in  Medicine,  Surgery,  and  Mid- 
wifery, and  must  be  of  M.A.  standing  in  the  University  of 
Dublin.*  They  must  also  read  a  Thesis  publicly  before  the 
Regius  Professor  of  Physic  and  his  Assessor,  or  must  undergo 
an  Examination  before  the  Regius  Professor  of  Physic,  according 
to  Regulations  to  he  approved  by  the  Provost  and  Senior  Fellows. 

The  Regulations  with  respect  to  the  Thesis  are  as  follows : — 

The  Thesis,  which  must  be  typewritten  or  printed,  shall  be 
sent  to  the  Registrar  of  the  School  of  Physic  not  less  than 
six  weeks  before  the  date  of  the  conferring  of  Degrees.  Notice 
will  be  given  to  the  candidate  of  the  date  fixed  for  the  reading 
of  the  Thesis.  At  the  reading,  the  Regius  Professor  and  his 
Assessor  shall  discuss  with  the  candidate  questions  connected 
with  the  Thesis,  and  may  also  examine  him  viva  voce  on  other 
medical  subjects  of  a  more  general  nature  ;  the  exercise  as  a 
whole  shall  ordinarily  last  not  less  than  one  liour. 

A  fee  of  £3  (payable  to  the  Registrar  of  the  School  of  Physic) 
shall  be  sent  by  the  candidate  along  with  the  Thesis,  and  this 
shall  be  deducted  from  the  fee  for  the  Degree  if  the  Thesis  be 
accepted. 

Fee  for  the  Degree  of  Doctor  in  Medicine,  £20. 

Commencements  will  be  held  on  20th  December,  1922,  and 
13th  February,  20th  April,  23rd  June,  and  20th  December,  1923. 


All  Degree  fees  are  payable  to  the  Senior  Proctor. 


*  A  candidate  is  of  M.A.  standing  three  years  after  having  passed  the  exami- 
nation for  the  B.A.  Degree. 


SCHOOL   OF   PHYSIC.  257 


DIPLOMA  IN  GYNECOLOGY  AND  OBSTKTIIIGS. 

Candidates  for  tlie  Universit}'  Diploma  in  Gyneecolog}'  and 
Obstetrics  must  be  Registered  Medical  Practitioners  who,  after 
the  date  of  registration,  have  taken  out  the  prescribed  course  of 
study  at  Trinity  College,  and  at  the  Kotunda  Hospital,  or  other 
Hospital  recognised  for  the  purpose  by  the  Board  and  Council. 
Six  mouths'  residence  in  Trinity  College,  or  in  the  case  of  women 
in  Trinity  Hall,  and  six  months'  residence  at  the  Rotunda  Hospital 
are  required. 

Instruction  is  given  during  the  year's  course  in  : — 

Practice  of  Midwifery, 
Practice  of  Gynaecology, 
Anatomy  of  the  Female  Pelvis, 
Elementary  Embryology, 
Pathology  of  the  Female  Organs,  and 
Ante-natal  Pathology. 

The  examination  for  the  Diploma  is  in  the  same  subjects. 

The  Fees  payable  are  as  follow  : — 

Rotunda    Hospital    instruction    for    six    months, 

including  rooms, 
Registration  and  Half-yearly  fee,  Trinity  College, 

six  montlis,         '    . .  '. .  . .  .,  .. 

Special  Anatomy  and  Embryology,     ■       ..     ■    ,','■■ 
Pathology, 

Examination  Fee,       . .         . .         . ,         . .   ' 
Fee  for  Diploma,       ..         ..  ..   -^  -. .  -   -■.< 

58  16     0  ■• 

In  addition  to  these  fees,  there  is  the  rent  of  rooms  in  Trinity 
College,  Dublin,  for  six  months  which  averages  about  £6  un- 
furnished. Certain  articles  of  permanent  furniture  are  supplied 
by  the  College  at  a  small  additional  rent. 

The  Dijiloma  fee  is  payable  to  the  Senior  Proclur. 


DIPLOMA  IN   PUBLIC   HEALTH. 

In  the  year  1870  a  "  Diploma  in  State  Medicine"  was  insti- 
tuted by  a  resolution  of  the  Board  of  Trinity  College.  In  1898 
it  was  resolved  that  the  title  of  the  "  Diploma  in  State  Medicine  " 
be  changed  to  that  of  "  Diploma  in  Public  Health." 

The  conditions  under  which  the  Diploma  is  awarded  are 
governed  by  the  Regulations  and  Rules  adopted  by  the  General 
Medical  Council. 


£ 

s. 

d. 

21 

0 

0 

11 

•5 

0 

6' 

6' 

0 

0 

5 

0 

10 

0 

0^ 

.•> 

0' 

0 

258  SCHOOL   OF   PHYSIC. 

A  copy  of  these  Rules,  a  list  of  Institulions  recognized  for 
purposes  of  instruction  by  Dublin  University,  and  deiiiils  of 
the  courses  of  instructini  yiven  at  the  School  of  Physic  are 
published  in  a  sejjurate  prosjjectus,  which  may  be  obtained  by 
application  to  the  Registrar  of  the  School  of  Physic,  Trinity 
College,  Dublin. 


REGULATIONS  OF  THE  SCHOOL  OF  DENTAL  SCIENCE. 

The  School  of  Dental  Science  consists  of  the  following  staff  for 
1922-23:— 

University  Professor  of  Anatomy  and  Vhirurgery. — Andrew 
Francis  Dixon,  M.B.,  Sc.D. 

Universiti/    Professor   of   Chemistry, — Svdnev  Young,   Sc.D., 
F.ll.S. 

Erasmus  Smith's  Professor  of  Natural  Philosophy. — William 
E.  Thrift,  M.A.,  F.T.C.D. 

King's     Professor   of  Institutes    of    Medicine  {I'hysioloyy). — 
Professor  Harold  Pringle,  M.D. 

King's  Professor  of  Practice  of  Medicine  .^Sir  James  Craig, 
M.D. 

Professor  of  Surgery.— Thomas  K.  Gordon,  M.B. 

Lecturer   in    Pathology. — Alexander    C.    O'Sullivan,     M.D., 
S.F.T.C.D. 

Lecturer  in  Dental  Surgery  and  Pathology.— A.  W.  W.  Baker, 
M.D.,  M.Dent.Sc. 

Lecturer  in  Dental  Mechanics. — Joseph  Cockburn,  L.D.S. 
Lecturer  in  Orthodontia.— E.  S.  Friel,  M.Dent.Sc. 
Lecturer  in  .4neesthetics.—T.  P.  C.  Kirkpatrick,  M.D. 


SCUOOL  OF   DENTAL   SCIEKCE.  259 


WINTER  SESSION,  1922-23. 

The  Winter  Session  begins  on  2nd  October. 

Lectures  commence  on  9th  October. 

Mechanics. — Lectures  for  Freshman  First  Year  Dental  ."Students 
(see  page  247). 

Physics. — Professor  Thrift,  at  1  o'clock,  on  Mondays,  Wednes- 
days, and  Fridaj's. 

Che7nist7y. —Troiessor  Young,  at  1  o'clock,  on  Tuesdays  and 
Thursdays,  and  11  o'clock  on  Saturdays. 

Practical    Chemistry.— Vroie&sor   Young,    at    10    o'clock,    on 
Saturdays. 

Systematic  Anatomy. — Professor  A.  F.  Dixon,  at  9  o'clock,  on 
Mondays,  Wednesdays,  and  Fridays. 

Physiology  (Junior  Class). — Professor  Pringle,  at  11  o'clock,  on 
Tuesdays,  Wednesdays,  and  Thursdays. 

Practical  Physiology  (Junior   Class). — Professor  Pringle  and 
Assistants,  2  to  4  o'clock,  on  Mondays  and  Fridays. 

Surgery. — Professor     Gordon,    at    12    o'clock,    on    Tuesdays 
and  Thursdays. 

Medicine. — Professor  Sir  James  Craig,  at  12  o'oluck,  on  Mon- 
days, Wednesdays,  and  Fridays. 

Dental  Mechanics. — Mr.  Cockbuirn,  at  5  o'clock,  on  Tuesdays 
and  Fridays. 

Dental  Surgery  and  Pathology. — Dr.  Baker,  at  5  o'clock,  on 
Tuesdays  and  Fridays. 

Dissections  from  October  to  March,  inclusive. 


SUMMER  SESSION,  1923. 
Lectures  commence  on  9th  April. 
Laboratory  Instruction  in  Chemistry. — Professor  Young. 

Students  work  in  the  Laboratory  from  2  to  4  o'clock,  on 
Tuesdays  and  Thursdays.  Each  Student  is  provided  with  full 
sets  of  Apparatus  and  Tests. 


260  SCHOOL   OF   DENTAL  SCIENCE. 


Laboratory  Instrticlion  in  Histoloyy. — Professor   H.  Pringle. 

Tliis  Course  will  be  given  in  the  Physiological  Laboratory  on 
Mondays,  Wednesdays,  and  Fridays,  from  2  to  4  o'clock.  A 
Lecture  will  be  given  in  the  Theatre,  on  one  day  in  each  week, 
after  which  Illustrative  Preparations  will  be  shown.  Students 
will  have  their  own  places  in  the  Laboratory,  each  with  a  Micro- 
scope, and  a  full  set  of  Apparatus  and  Reagents.  The  Laboratory 
will  be  open  to  Members  of  tlie  Class  daily,  except  during  Class 
hours. 

Dental  Anatomy  and  Physioloyy, — Professor  A.  F.  Dixon  and 
Mr.  Friel,  9  to  1 1  o'clock,  on  Tuesdays  and  1  hursdays. 

Orthadontia. — Mr.  Friel,  at  5  o'clock,  on  Mondays  and  Fridays. 

Anessthetics.- — Dr.  Kirkpatrick,  at  5  o'clock,  on  "Wednesdays. 


COMBINED  AETS  AND  DENTAL  CUfiRICULUM. 

The  University  of  Dublin  grants  the  degrees  of  Bachelor  and  Master 
in  Dental  Science. 

Either  of  these  qualifications  entitles  the  holder  to  be  registered  as  a 
licensed  Dental  practitioner. 

In  order  to  obtain  the  Degree  of  Bachelor  (B.  Dent.  So.)  Candidates 
must  have  completed  the  course  for  the  Arts  degree  (B.A.)'  of  the 
University  and  have  spent  at  least  four  years  in  the  School  of  Dentistry. 
The  Degree  of  Master  in  Dental  Science  (M.  Dent.  So.)  is  awarded 
after  a  further  examination,  and  cannot  be  taken  until  the  end  of  a 
fifth  year  of  study. 

The  Dental  and  Arts  Courses  may  be  taken  separately  or  con- 
currently. 

It  is  to  be  understood  {«)  that  the  Arts  Courses  to  be  attended  by 
Dental  Students  are  the  same  as  those  to  be  attended  by  Medical 
Students ;  and  [b)  that,  with  the  exceptions  noted,  the  Professional 
Courses  mentioned  below  as  necessary  for  Dental  Students  are  the  same 
as  those  for  Medical  Students. 

The  following  curriculum  has  been  drawn  up  for  students  who  desire 
to  pursue  their  Arts  and  Dental  studies  concurrently : — 

The  student  should — 

1    Pass  the  Entrance  Bkamination  (Trinity  College). 

.2.  Pass  any  Junior  Freshman  Term  Examination,  or  the  Special 
Preliminary  Examination  in  Arts  held  in  March  and  October. 


J 


SCHOOL   OF   DENTAL   SCIENCE.  261 

Upon  the  completion  of  the  second  of  these  examinations  the  student 
should  register  as  a  Dental  Student*  at  the  office  of  the  Registrar  of  the 
School  of  Physic,  and  begin  his  combined  Course  for  the  Arts  and 
I>ental  degrees  in  October  or  April. 

Note. — The  Fees  for  the  courses  marked  thus  *  are  included  in  the 
Arts  Fees. 
First  Winter — 

•Mechanics  (Statics  and  Dynamics,  see  page  247). 
*Physics  Lectures  fMichaelmas  and  Hilary  Terms). 
'Physics,  Practical. 
Chemistry  Lectures  and  Laboratory,  . .  ..£330 

Systematic  Anatomy  Lectures         . .  . ,  . .       3     3     0 

Anatomy,  dissections         . .  . .  . .  ,,550 


£11   11     0 
Examination  in  Experimental  Physics. 

First  Summer — 

Practical   Chemistry,   together    with   Practical   Dental 

Metallurgy      ..  ..  ..  ..  ..£220 

Histulogy,  together  with  Dental  Histology    . .  . .       5     5     0 

Dental  Anatomy  and  Physiology  (Human  &  Comparative)*'    2     2     0 

£9     9     0 
•Mechanics  (Statics  and  Dynamics). 
•English  Composition. 

Completion  of  the  Preliminary  Scientific  Dental  Examination. 

In  June  of  his  first  year  the  Student  should  complete  the  Preliminary 
Scientific  Dental  Examination  in  Chemistry  and  Physics,  and  also  the 
Examination  in  Dental  Anatomy.  Before  be  is  admitted  to  any  of  these 
Examinations  he  must  have  attended  the  courses  indicated  above  to  the 
satisfaction  of  his  Teachers. 

Second  Winter — 

General  Hospital  . .  , .  . ,  . . 

Dissections  . .  . .  . ,  . . 

Physiology,  Lectures 

Physiology,  Practical 

Surgery,  including  the  elements  of  Surgical  Pathology 

and  Surgery  in  its  applications  to  Dental  Surgery  • 

Lectures  ..  ..  ..  .,  ..220 

Medicine,  including  the  elements  of  General  Pathology 
and  the  applications  of  Medicine  to  Dental  Surgery 
Lectures         . ,  . .  . ,  . .  ..330 

£28     7     0 

»  Students  are  advised  to  reg-ister  both  as  Dental  and  Medical  Students.  A 
Student  who  has  done  this  is  entitled  to  count  some  of  the  Courses  which  he  takes 
as  a  Dental  Student  as  a  part  of  his  Medical  Course,  should  he  at  a  later  date 
determine  to  take  the  Medical  Degrees. 

•■  Special  Coutse ;  two  days  per  week,  together  with  practical  work  and 
demonstrations.  • 


£12  12 

0 

0       0 

0 

3     3 

0 

2     2 

0 

262  SCHOOL   OF   DENTAl.  SCIENCE. 

Intermediate  Dental  Examination. 

Students  who  begin  their  Dental  course  in  the  Summer  Session  are 
advised  in  their  first  summer  to  attend  Dental  Anatomy,  Statics  and 
Dynamics,  and  English  Composition. 

At  the  completion  of  his  second  Winter  Session  the  Student  should 
pass  the  Intermediate  Dental  Examination  in  Anatomy  and  Physiology. 

Before  he  is  admitted  to  the  Intermediate  Dental  Examination  the 
Student  must  have  completed  the  courses  of  instruction  indicated  above, 
to  the  satisfaction  of  his  Teachers,  and  must  have  passed  the  Preliminary 
Scientific  Dental  Examination  in  Chemistry  and  Physics,  and  in  Dental 
Anatomy. 

Second  Summer —   . 

General  Hospital  (included  in  Winter  Fee). 
Dental  Mechanics  (Practical). » 
*Logic  Lectures  and  English  Composition. 

During  the  Summer,  Students  should  prepare  for  the  Arts  Part  of  the 
Final  Freshman  Examination,  and  should  pass  it  in  the  following 
October.  The  subjects  are: — Mechanics,  Logics,  English  Composition, 
and  one  language,  viz.:  Latin,  Greek,  French,  German,  or  Irish. 

Examination  in  Clinical  Hospital  Practice. 

At  the  completion  of  his  attendance  at  a  general  Hospital  the  Student 
should  enter  for  the  Examination  in  Clinical  Hospital  practice. 

Having  completed  the  Final  Freshman  and  Intermediate  Dental 
Examinations,  the  Student  should  devote  his  time  to  work  at  the 
Dental  Hospital.  For  two  years  he  should  attend  each  forenoon  the 
surgical  practice  of  this  Hospital,  and  in  the  afternoons  the  instruction 
given  in  Mechanical  Dentistry. 

Third  Winter— 

Dental  Surgery  (Hospital  Practice)''  ..  ..£15  15     0 

Dental  Mechanics  (Practical)"         ..  ..  ..     60     0     0 

Lectures  in  Elementary  Dental  Mechanics  and  Dental 

Metallurgy  (from  October  to  Christmas). 
Lectures  in  Dental    Surgery  and  Pathology,  including  )>    3     3     0 
Materia  Medica   and   Therapeutics  in  their  applica- 
tions to  Dental  Surgery  (for  rest  of  Winter  Session) 

•  £78  18  0 
Third  Summer — 

Dental  Surgery  (Hospital  Practice)   )  *  (included  in  Winter 

Dental  Mechanics  (Practical)  }  Fee) 

*Art8  Lectures. 

•  Students  who  have  failed  to  complete  the  Intermediate  Dental  Examination 
are  advised  not  to  be^in  their  instruction  in  Dental  Alechanics  until  June. 
Before  presenting  himself  for  the  Final  Hxamination,the  Student  must  have  taker, 
a  minimum  ofay  months'  instruction  in  Practical  Dental  Mechanics. 

b  .Students  joining  between  ist  December  and  jist  July  pay  £i  is.  extra. 

•  The  Dental  Hospital  fee  for  Practical  Dental  Mechanics  is  ;Cioo  in  one  sura 
or  £6q  and  ^^45  if  paid  in  two  instalments. 


SCHOOL   OF   DENTAL  SCIEXCK.  263 


Fourth  Winter — 


Uental  Surgery  (Hospital  Practice)*  ..  ..£15  15     0 

Dental  Mechanics  (Practical)  . .  . .  . .     45     0     0 

Advanced  Dental  Mechanics  (from  October  to  Christmas)  \ 
Dental    Surgery    and    Pathology,    including    Materia  | 

Medica    and    Therapeutics    in    their  application    to  [-   2     2     0 
Dental  Surgery  and  Pathology  (for  rest  of  Winter 
Session) .  ] 


£62  17     0 
Fourth  Summer — 

Dental  Surgery  (Hospital  Practice)  )  (included  in  Winter 

Dental  Mechanics  (Practical)  )  Fee) 

Orthodontia         ..  ..  ..  ..  ..110 

Demonstrations  in  the  use  of  Anaesthetics  . .       110 

*Arts  Lectures.  

£2     2     0 


Final  Dental  Examination. 

At  the  completion  of  the  fourth  year  the  Student  should  enter  for  the 
Final  Dental  Examination,  the  sui)jects  for  which  are — 

Dental  Mechanics  and  Metallurgy. 

Paper,  Practical  and  Viva  voce. 

Dental  Surgery   and   Pathology,  including   Materia   Medica  and 
Therapeutics  in  their  application  to  Dental  Surgery. 
Paper,  Practical  and  Viva  voce. 

Orthodontia.     Viva  voce. 

The  fee  for  the  Degree  Examination  is  £5. 

The  degree  of  Bachelor  in  Dental  Science  is  conferred  on  Students  who 
have  c»mi)leted  the  above  Courses  and  Examinations,  passed  in  the 
subject  of  the  Arts  Lectures  attended  in  the  fourth  Summer  and  in 
English  Composition  at  an  ordinary  Examination  for  the  B.A.  Degree, 
and  paid  the  Degree  fee— £10— to  the  Senior  Proctor. 


*  See  note  b,  p.  262. 


264 


SCHOOL   OF   DENTAL   SCIENCE. 


Bachelor  in  Dental  Science  (B.  Dent.  Sc.)- 

The  total  Fees  in  order  to  obtain  the  degree  of  Bachelor  in  Dental 
Science  are :  — 


Entrance  Fee,  Arts  Fees  (4  years),  and  Fee  for 
B.A.  Degree,    ..  £101 

Lecture,  Laboratory,  and  Hospital  Fees — 


First  Winter 
First  Summer 
Second  Winter 
Second  Summer 
Tliird  Winter 
Third  Summer 
Fourth  Winter 
Fourtli  Summer 
Examination  Fee 
Fee  for  Degree 


0     0 


£11   11     0 


9     9 
28    : 

0 
0 

.     78  18 

0 

62  17 
-     2 
0     0 

10     0 

0 
0 
0 
0 

£309     4 

0 

EXAMINATIONS. 

For  dates  of  Examinations,  and  regulations  regarding  Entries 
for  Examinations,  see  pages  279-280. 

Graduates  in  Medicine  of  the  University  of  Dublin  who  desire  to  take 
a  degree  in  Dentistry  are  admitted  to  the  B.  Dent.  Sc.  Examination  on 
producing  certificates  as  follows  :  — 

1.  One  year's  attendance  at  the  surgical  practice  of  a  recognized 

"Dental  Hospital. 

2.  Two  years'  practical  Dental  Mechanics. 

3.  Lectures  on  Dental  Surgery  and  Pathology,  Mechanics,  Anatomy, 

Orthodontia,  and  Anaesthetics. 


Master  in  Dental  Science  (M.  Dent.  Sc). 

Candidates  for  the  Degree  of  Master  in  Dental  Science  must  be 
Bachelors  in  Dental  Science  of  at  least  one  year's  standing.  They  will 
be  required  to  pass  an  examination  in  Pathology  and  Bacteriology,  and 
either  to  carry  out  Dental  work  of  an  advanced  character  to  the  satis- 
faction of  the  Examiners,  or  to  present  a  thesis,  to  be  approved  of  by 
them,  giving  evidence  of  original  research  on  some  subject  connected 
with  Dentistry. 

The  fee  for  the  M.  Dent.  Sc.  Examination  is  £5,  and  the  fee  for  the 
Degree  is  £10. 


SCHOOL  or   PHYSIC.  265 

PRIVILEGES  ATTACHED  TO  THE   SCHOOL  OF  PHYSIC. 

PRIVILEGES    or   MATKICDLATED   8TDDENTS. 

Students  in  Arts  are  entitled  to  attend  a  Course  of  Lectures 
in  Surgery,  in  Botany,  and  in  Zoology  at  a  reduction  of  one-half, 
and  in  Chemistry  at  a  reduction  of  one-third,  of  the  usual  Fees. 
Thev  are  also  entitled  to  a  Course  of  Exnerimental  Phvsics  free. 


ARTS  DEGREE. 
REGULATIONS  FOR  MEDICAL  AND    DENTAL  STUDENTS. 

1.  In  order  to  join  the  Medical  or  Dental  School,  a  Student 
must  have  either 

(a)  passed    a  Junior   Freshman   Term    Examination,    exclusive    of 
Trigonometry, 
or 

{b)  passed  eitlier  the  Special  Preliminary  Examination  held  in  March 
or  that  held  in  the  first  days  of  October.     The  standard  subjects  are 
those  of  the  Hilary  Junior  Freshman  Examination,* 
or 

(c)  obtained  at  the  Examination  for  Junior  Exhibitions  marks  showing 
sufficient  merit  in  the  subjects  of  (a)  or  (b). 

Note. — Rising  Junior  Freshmen  desiring  to  begin  their  Medical  or 
Dental  Curriculum  have  the  privilege  of  presenting  themselves  at  either 
the  Michaelmas  Junior  Freshman  Examination  (exclusive  of  Trigo- 
nometry) or  the  Supplemental  Hilary  Examination  at  the  end  of  Trinity 
Term,  without  paying  the  May  fee  of  the  Junior  Freshman  Year.  But 
they  obtain  no  academic  credit  for  either  examination  beyond  the  right 
of  entering  the  Medical  or  Dental  School. 

2.  All  Medical  and  Dental  Students  of  undergraduate  standing, 
who  claim  professional  privileges  in  Arts,  must  attend  at  least 
one  course  of  Arts  Lectures  in  the  Trinity  Term  of  each  year. 
The  subjects  of  these  lectures  are  as  follows : — 

Junior  Freshman  Year. 

Mechanics    (including    Elementary   Trigonometry)    and    English 
Composition. 

Senior  Freshman  Year. 

Logic  (Formal)  and  English  Composition. 

Junior  and  Senior  Sophister  Year. 

The  two  Arts  Courses  attended  in  the  Trinity  Terms  of  the  Sophister 
Years  may  be  any  two,   with  English  Composition,  of  the  following 

*  At  the  Preliminary  Examination  in  October  Students  may  present  themselves 
in  the  subjects  of  the  Junior  Freshmen  Michaelmas  Term  Examination,  omitting 
Trigonometry,  should  they  so  desire. 

K 


266  SCHOOL  OF  PHYSIC. 

subjects:— (1)    Astronomy,      (2)    Languages :— French   and    German, 
(3)  Psychology,   (4)  Ethics,  (5)  Political  and  Economic  Science. 

Note  1. — Students  whose  English  Composition  is  unsatisfactory  may 
be  required  to  attend  special  lectures  in  that  subject. 

Note  2. — Students  who  enter  the  Medical  or  Dental  School  at  the 
commencement  of  their  Senior  Freshman  Year,  and  have  obtained  credit 
for  only  one  term  as  Junior  Freshmen,  must,  in  the  Trinity  Term  of 
the  Senior  Freshman  Year,  attend  the  Lectures  in  Logic  (Formal)  and 
English  Composition,  and  in  either  the  Hilary  or  the  Trinity  Term 
attend  the  Lectures  in  Mechanics. 

Note  3. — In  order  to  obtain  credit  for  the  Arts  Term  in  the  Junior 
Sophister  Year,  the  student  must  pass  an  examination  at  the  end  of 
the  Term  in  the  subject  in  which  he  has  attended  Lectures. 

^ote  4. — A  student,  having  passed  the  Final  Freshman  Examination, 
may  obtain  credit  for  the  Arts  Terms  of  his  Sopliister  Years  by  attendance 
at  the  Sophister  Moderatorsliip  Lectures  in  any  siibject,  provided  that 
he  afterwards  obtains  a  Moderatorship  in  that  subject,  and  has  already 
obtained  the  B.A.  Degree  of  another  University. 

3.  Students  who  have  entered  the  Medical  or  Dental  School  not 
later  than  the  commencement  of  their  Senior  Freshman  Year, 
and  have  obtained  credit  for  such  terms  of  Arts  Lectures  as 
thev  are  required  under  §  2  to  attend  in  the  Freshman  Years,  will 
obtain  credit  for  the  Final  Freshman  Examination  by  passing — 

(d)  The  Preliminary  Scientific  Examination  of  the  Medical  School,  or 
the  Preliminary  Scientific  Dental  Examination  and  the  Exami- 
nation in  Dental  Anatomy. 
(b)  An  Examination  in  Mechanics,  Logics,  English  Composition,  and 
one  of    the    following    languages: — Greek,    Latin,    French, 
German. 
The  Examination  in  Mechanics  may  be  taken  concurrently  with  the 
rest  of  the  Arts  part  of  the  Final  Freshman  Examination,  or  as  in  §  4. 
If  taken  as  in  §  4,  this  examination  must  be  passed  before  the  Final 
Freshman  Examination. 

A  student  need  not  have  passed  [a)  in  whole  or  in  part  before  pre- 
senting himself  for  [b),  but  he  must  have  passed  both  before  the  Trinity 
Lectures  of  his  Junior  Sophister  year. 

4.  An  Examination  will  be  held  in  the  Mechanics  of  the  Final 
Freshman  Course  (including  Elementary  Trigonometry),  at  the 
date  of  each  of  the  Preliminary  Scientific  Examinations. 

5.  No  student  will  be  allowed  to  attend  the  Arts  Lectures  in 
the  Trinity  Term  of  the  Junior  Sophister  Year  until  he  has 
obtained  credit  for  the  Final  Freshman  Examination. 

6.  Students  who  have  obtained  credit  for  such  attendance  at 
Arts  Lectures  of  the  Sophister  years  as  is  required  of  thera 
under  §  2,  and  who  have  made  satisfactory  progress  with  their 
Medical  studies  during  those  years  (see  §  7),  may  present  them- 
selves for  the  Arts  portion  of  their  Degree  Examination. 


SCHOOL   OF   PHYSIO.  267 

At  this  Examination  the  student  must  pass  in  English  Composition 
and  the  subject  in  which  he  has  attended  lectures  in  his  Senior  Sophister 
Year. 

7.  The  words  '  satisfactory  progress  '  in  §  6  are  thus  interpreted. 
Before  presenting  themselves  for  the  Arts  Degree — 

(a)  Students  who  have  entered  the  School  not  later  than  the  com- 

mencement of  their  Senior  Freshman  Year  must  have  passed 
Part  II.  of  the  Intermediate  Medical  Examination,  or  have 
passed  the  Intermediate  Dental  Examination,  and  kept  one 
year  at  the  Dental  Hospital  to  the  satisfaction  of  their  teachers. 

(b)  Those  who  have  entered  the  School   not   later   than   t)ie   com- 

mencement of  their  Junior  Sophister  Year  must  have  passed 
Part  I.  of  the  Intermediate  Medical  Examination,  or  the 
Intermediate  Dental  Examination. 
((-•)  Those  who  have  entered  the  School  not  later  than  the  com- 
mencement of  their  Senior  Sophister  Year  must  have  passed 
the  Preliminary  Scientific  Examination,  or  the  Preliminary 
Scientific  Dental  Examination,  and  the  Examination  in  Dental 
Anatomy. 

Xofe. — These  regulations  may  be  relaxed  in  the  case  of  candidates  for 
Moderatorsiiip. 

8.  A  Student  who  has  satisfied  the  conditions  laid  down  in  §  6 
may  obtain  credit  for  the  Degree  Examination,  either 

(a)  by  passing  in  tlie  Arts  suiiject  in  which  he  has  attended  lectures 
in  his  Senior  Soi)hister  Year  and  in  English  Composition  at  an 
ordinary  examination  for  the  B.A.  Degree,  and  passing  Part 
II.  of  the  Intermediate  Medical  Examination,  or  the  Inter- 
mediate Dental  Examination. 
or 

(A)  by  obtaining  a  Moderatorship,  or  by  passing  the  full  ordinal y 
examination  for  the  B.A.  Degree. 

9.  A  student  who  has  failed  to  obtain  credit  for  attendance  at 
the  Arts  Lectures  given  in  Trinity  Term,  whether  through 
sickness,  or  irregular  attendance,  or  want  of  diligence,  or  by 
failing  to  pass  the  Examination  mentioned  in  §  2,  note  3,  or  from 
any  other  cause,  may  supplement  the  Term  as  follows  : — 

(a)  If  a  Junior  Freshman,  he  may  pass  the  Junior  Freshman 
Michaelmas  Term  Examination,  or  the  Senior  Freshman 
Hilary  or  Trinity  Term  Examination. 

(A)  If  a  Senior  Freshman,  he  may  supplement  the  Trinity  Senior 
Freshman  Examination  in  October  or  in  the  following 
January ;  and  may  pass  the  Final  Freshman  Examination 
for  Medical  Students  in  Hilary  or  supplement  it  in  Trinity 
following. 

(c)  If  a  Junior  Sophister,  he  may  pass  the  Michaelmas  Examination 

of  his  class,  or  the  Hilary  or  Trinity  Examination  of  the 
Senior  Sophister  Year,  taking  English  Composition  and  two 
subjects. 


268  SCHOOL    OF    PHYSIC. 

(d)  If  a  Senior  Sophister,   he  must  supplement  a  Senior   Sophisler 
Examination,  taking  English  Composition  and  three  subjects^ 

A  Student  who  fails  to  comply  with  these  Rules  loses  his  class. 

yote. — A  Junior  Freshman  who  is  prevented  by  sickness,  or  other 
sufficient  reason,  from  attending  Lectures  in  Trinity  Term,  may,  by 
special  permission  of  the  Senior  Lecturer,  take  a  second  course  in  his 
Senior  Freshman  year  instead. 

10.  If  at  any  time  a  Student  is  reported  by  the  Medical  School 
Committee  to  the  Senior  Lecturer,  as  having  ceased  to  pursue 
his  studies  with  diligence,  be  shall  thereupon  lose  the  privileges 
accorded  to  Medical  or  Dental  Students,  until  such  time  as  the 
Medical  School  Committee  report  that  he  lias  resumed  diligent 
attendance. 

If  such  unfavourable  report  be  made  at  the  end  of  the  Summer 
Session,  the  Student  will  obtain  no  academic  credit  for  tlie  Arts 
Lectures  he  may  have  attended  during  the  Trinity  Term  of  that 
year. 

11.  Medical  and  Dental  Students  who  do  not  claim  professional 
privileges  may  keep  their  course  in  Arts  by  passing  the  usual 
Term  Examinations  and  Degree  Examination  in  full.  Those  who 
have  kept  part  of  their  course  in  this  way,  may,  at  any  time, 
claim  the  privilege  of  completing  it  under  the  scheme  detailed 
above. 


PRIZES. 


The  following  Prizes,  obtainable  either  during,  or  at  the 
completion  of,  the  preceding  Courses  of  Education,  are  open  to 
the  Students  of  the  School  of  Physic. 

MKDICAL  AND  SUKGICAL  TKAVKLLING   PKIZEfe. 

A  Prize  of  £100,  founded  in  1869,  is  awarded  by  the  Board,  in 
alternate  vears,  to  the  best  answerer  at  a  special  Examination  in 
Medicine  or  in  Surgery,  provided  that  the  merit  be  deemed  suffi- 
cient. Successful  Candidates  are  required  to  spend  three  months 
in  the  study  of  Medicine  or  Surgery,  as  the  case  may  be,  in  Berlin, 
Paris,  or  Vienna.  Beforetheycanobtainthefirstinstalmentof  £50, 
they  must  satisfy  the  Senior  Lecturer  that  they  possess  sufficient 
knowledge  of  a  Continental  Language  to  derive  full  benefit  from 
the  Prize.  The  Examination  is  held  in  June,  and  is  open  to 
Students  who  have  passed  the  Final  Examination  in  Medicine  or  in 
Suro'erv,  as  the  case  may  be,  within  two  years  of  the  Examination 

In  order  to  obtain  the  second  sum  of  £50,  Prizemen  must 
have  furnished  to  the  Regius  Professor  their  formal  Report  on  the 


Hospitals  attended  by  them,  within  two  years  from  the  time  of 
obtaining  the  Prize. 

The  subjects  of  the  Medical  Travelling:  Prize  Examination  are 
Clinical  Medicine,  Practice  of  Medicine,  Therapeutics,  Pathology, 
and  Obstetric  Medicine. 

The  subjects  of  the  Surg-ical  Travelling  Prize  Examination  are 
Clinical  Surgery,  Operative  Surgery,  Pathology,  Surgical  Ana- 
tomy, and  Ophthalmic  Surgery. 

In  accordance  with  the  above  conditions,  an  Examination 
in  Medicine  will  be  held  7th  June,  1923,  at  which  a  Medical 
Travelling  Prize,  of  the  value  of  £100,  will  be  competed  for. 

A  similar  Travelling  Prize  in  Surgery  will  be  competed  for 
in  1924. 

Notice  must  be  given  to  the  Registrar  of  the  School  of  Physic 
fourteen  days  before  the  first  day  of  Examination . 


THE  SIR  JOHN  BANKS  MEDAL  AND  PEIZE. 

These  were  founded  in  1907  by  Sir  John  T.  Banks,  K.C.F5., 
M.l).,  for  twenty  years  (1849-69)  King's  Professor  of  the  Practice 
of  Medicine,  and  for  eighteen  years  (1880-98)  Regius  Professor 
of  Physic.  A  bronze  Medal  is  awarded  to  the  winner,  and  a 
Money  Prize,  value  about  £15,  to  the  second  best  candidate,  at 
the  Medical  Travelling  Prize  Examination. 


THE  EDWAUD  HALLAKAN  BENNETT  MEDAL  AND  PRIZE. 

These  were  founded  in  1907  by  past  pupils  of  E.  H.  Bennett,  M.D., 
for  nine  years  (1864-73)  University  Anatomist,  and  for  thirty - 
three  years  (1873-1906)  Professor  of  Surgery,  in  "  appreciation 
of  his  eminent  services  to  the  surgical  profession,  and  of  his 
many  acts  of  kindness  to  them  while  students."  A  bronze 
Medal  is  awarded  to  the  winner,  and  a  Money  Prize  to  the  second 
best  candidate,  at  the  Surgical  Travelling  Prize  Examination. 


FITZ-PATRICK   SCHOLARSHIP. 

This  Scholarship  was  founded  in  November,  1901,  by  Mrt. 
Fitz-Patrick,  in  memory  of  her  husband,  Thomas  Fitz-Patrick, 
M.D.  (Dubl.).  It  consists  of  the  interest  on  £1000.  It  will  be 
awarded  annually  to  the  Student  who  obtains  the  highest  aggre- 
gate marks  at  Part  II.  of  the  Intermediate,  and  Parts  I.  and  II. 
of  the  Final  Examinations,  provided  that  the  Student  has  com- 
pleted the  Medical  Course  in  the  prescribed  period  of  five  years. 


270  PEIZKS. 

MEDICAL  SCHOLAKSHirS. 

Two  Medical  Scholarships,  founded  in  1860.  are  offered  an- 
nually, tenable  for  two  years,  with  a  Salary  of  £20  per  annum, 
one  being  for  Anatomy  and  Physiologj',  the  other  for  Chemistry, 
Physics,  Botany,  and  Zoology. 

The  following  Regulations  have  been  adopted:  — 

(1).  No  Students  can  compete  for  the  Scholarship  in  Anaioniv  and 
Physiology  after  the  completion  of  their  third  year:  nur  for  that  in 
Chemistry,  Physics,  Botany,  and  Zoology,  after  the  compieiiou  of  their 
second  year. 

Students  who  enter  the  Medical  School  in  a  Summer  Session  will  be 
allowed  to  compete  for  Scholarship  in  Anatomy  and  Physiology  at  the 
end  of  their  Fourth  Summer  Session. 

(2).  No  Student  can  hold  both  Scholarships  together. 

(3).  Sixty  per  cent,  of  the  marks  at  the  Examination  for  the  Scholar- 
ship in  Chemistry,  Physics,  Botany,  and  Zoology,  are  allowed  to  the 
two  former,  and  the  remaining  forty  per  cent,  to  the  two  latter  subjects. 

The  best  answerers  at  the  Examination  are  elected  to  these 
Scholarships,  provided  that  they  have  their  names  on  the  College 
Books,  have  kept  one  Annus  Medicus  in  the  School  of  Physic, 
have  obtained  credit  for  the  prescribed  Arts  exercises,  and  that 
their  answering  is  of  a  high  order. 

Graduates  in  Arts  otherwise  qualified  may  be  Candidates  for 
Medical  Scholarships  without  having  their  names  on  the  College 
Books. 

Candidates  for  the  Scholarship  in  Chemistry,  Physics,  Botany, 
and  Zoology,  are  recommended  to  attend  the  Demonstrations  of 
the  Professors  of  Botany  and  Zoology  during  Michaelmas,  Hilary, 
and  Trinity  Terms. 

Candidates  for  Medical  Scholarship  will  be  allowed  to  substi- 
tute attendance  on  the  Lectures  and  Demonstrations  in  Zoology 
and  Comparative  Anatomy  given  in  Michaelmas,  Hilary,  and 
Trinity  Terms  for  attendance  on  the  Lectures  in  Zoology  given 
during  the  Summer  Session. 

DK.    HENEY    HUTCHINSON   STEWAKT    MEDICAL   SCHOLAKSIIUS. 

Dr.  Henry  Hutchinson  Stewart  Scholarships  in  («)  Anatomy  and 
Institutes  of  Medicine,  and  in  (i)  Chemistry,  Physics,  Botany, 
and  Zoology,  of  the  value  of  £10  per  annum,  tenable  for  three 
years,  are  awarded  from  time  to  time. 

The  Regulations  for  these  Scholarships  are;  — 

Students  may  be  of  any  standing  in  Arts. 

No  Student  is  allowed  to  compete  a  second  time  for  a  Scholarship  in 
the  same  subjects. 


PUIZE8.  271 

A  Scholarship  will  be  awarded  to : — 

(a)  The  Candidate  who  obtains  first  place  at  the  Intermediate  Exami- 
nation, Part  I,  in  Jun^ ,  provided  that,  in  the  opinion  of  the  Examiners, 
he  obtains  High  Marks,  and 

(b)  The  Candidate  who  obtains  the  highest  total  of  murks  at  the 
Examination  in  Physics  in  March,  and  the  Examinations  in  Botany 
and  Zoology,  and  Chemistry,  in  June,  provided  that,  in  the  opinion  of 
the  Examiners,  he  obtains  High  Marks. 

No  Student  may  compete  for  (b)  who  has  been  more  than  two 
Summer  and  one  Winter  Session  in  the  School,  or  for  (a)  who  has  been 
more  than  three  Summer  and  two  Winter  Sessions  in  the  School. 
Equal  marks  will  be  awarded  to  Anatomy  and  Physiology  in  (a),  and 
to  each  of  the  four  subjects,  Botany,  Zoology,  Chemistry,  and  Physics 
in  (b). 


DR.    HEXKY    HUTCHINSON   STEWART   SCH0LAU8HIP8  IN 
MENTAL   DISEASE. 

These  Scholarships  are  awarded  from  time  to  time.  Tliey  are 
of  value  about  £50  per  annum,  and  are  tenable  for  three  years. 
The  Regulations  are  as  follows: — 

An  Examination  will  be  held  for  a  Scholarsliip  on  Jane  7th, 
1923. 

Candidates  must  have  passed  the  M.B.  Examination  not  more  than 
seven  months  previously. 

The  successful  candidate  must  spend  not  less  than,  six  months  as 
resident  or  outdoor  pupil  in  a  recognized  Institution  for  the  treatment 
of  Mental  Diseases  approved  by  the  Board  of  Trinity  College,  and  under 
such  conditions  as  ihey  sriall  from  time  to  time  prescribe  ;  this  period  to 
be  commenced  within  six  months  from  the  date  of  election. 

Thfe  Scholarship  will  not  be  awarded  unless  sufficient  merit  be  shown. 

No  person  will  be  admitted  to  compete  a  second  time  for  the 
Scholarship. 

The  subjects  for  the  Examination  are  Mental  Diseases  and  the 
methods  of  examining  Nervous  Tissues. 

Candidates  are  recommended  to  read : — 

Psychological  Medicine  by  Maurice  Craig. 

JOHN   MALLET    PUK8EK   MEDAL. 

In  189J  a  bronze  medal,  to  be  called  "  tlie  John  Mallet  Purser 
Medal,"  was  founded  by  his  past  pupils  in  honour  of  Dr.  John 
Mallet  Purser,  to  mark  the  twenty-tif'th  year  of  his  tenure  of  the 
Kin^^'s  Professorship  of  the  Inbtitutes  ol  Medicine. 

The  medal  is  awarded  annually  to  the  Student  who,  being 
successful  in  passing  the  Intermediate   Medical  Examination, 


'i12  PM2K8. 

Part  I,  held  in  June,  obtains  the  highest  marks  in  PhysiologT 
and  Histology. 

No  Student  is  eligible  to  compete  who,  at  the  time  of  the 
examination,  has  been  longer  than  three  years  in  tl¥!  Medical 
School. 

DANIEL  JOHN    CUNNINGHAM   MEMORIAL   MEDAL   AND   PRIZE. 

In  1909  a  Prize  and  Bronze  Medal  were  founded  by  his  pupils 
and  friends  in  memory  of  Dr.  Daniel  John  Cunningham,  some- 
time University  Professor  of  Anatomy. 

The  Medal  and  Prize  are  awarded  annually  to  the  Student 
who,  being  successful  in  passing  the  Intermediate  Medical 
Examination,  Part  I,  held  in  June,  obtains  the  higliest  marks  in 
Anatomy. 

No  Student  is  eligible  to  compete  who,  at  the  time  of  the 
examination,  has  been  longer  than  three  years  in  the  Medical 
School. 

BE6LET    STUDENTSHIPS. 

In  Trinity  Term,  1905,  bequests  from  William  Chapman  Begley, 
B.A.,  M.B.  of  £5200,  2^  per  Cent.  Consols,  and  from  his  wife, 
Jane  Begley,  of  £1004  14s.  6cL,  for  the  purpose  of  endowing  four 
Medical  Studentships,  were  received  by  the  Board. 

The  Studentships  are  open  to  all  Undergraduates  who  have  passed 
the  Final  Senior  Freshman  Examination,  and  who  have  entered  or  intend 
immediately  to  enter  the  Medical  School.  "Where  the  qualification 
and  merits  of  the  Candidates  for  the  Studentships  are,  in  the  opinion 
of  the  Board,  otherwise  equal,  preference  is  given  according  lo  the 
seniority  of  their  standing  in  Arts  at  the  time  of  their  entering  the 
School.  Every  Student  during  his  tenure  shall  pursue  his  studies  in 
the  School  to  the  satisfaction  of  the  Board ;  if  he  fails  to  do  so,  or  is 
guilty  of  any  serious  misconduct  or  breach  of  College  discipline,  he 
shall  cease  to  be  entitled  to  the  Studentship,  unless  for  special  reasons 
the  Board  shall  determine  otherwise. 

One  Studentship,  value  about  £37  per  annum,  tenable  for  four 
years,  or  until  the  holder  becomes  medically  qualified,  is  awarded 
annually  about  the  last  Saturday  in  November.  Candidates  must 
apply  through  their  Tutors  to  the  Board,  and  submit  a  list  of  their 
distinctions  in  Arts,  and  also  of  their  distinctions  in  Medicine,  if  they 
have  been  for  some  time  students  in  the  School. 

KINGSMILL  JONES  MEMORIAL  PEIZE. 

In  1920  a  Prize,  in  value  about  £15,  to  be  called  the  *'  Kingsmill 
Jones  Memorial  Prize,"  was  founded  by  his  friends  in  memory 
of  Captain  Kingsmill  Williams  Jones,  M.D.,  D.S.O.,  killed  in 
action  in  the  German  War,  2nd  August,  19)8. 

It  is  awarded  annually  in  Michaelmas  Term  to  the  Medical 
Student  who  shows  the  best  general  knowledge  of  Natural  or  of 
Experimental  Science,  or  of  both,  as  shown  by  the  results  of  the 
IJonor  Examinations  in  Arts  in  these  subjects. 


PRIZES.  273 

PllOFKSSOKS'    PRIZES. 

The  Professor  of  Practice  of  Medicine  gives  Prizes  in  the 
"Winter  Course  araountinp  to  £5, 

The  Professor  of  3Iiilwifery  gives  Prizes  in  the  Winter  Course 
amounting  to  £o. 

The  Professor  of  Materia  Medica  gives  Prizes  in  the  Summer 
Course  amounting  to  £5. 

T'he  Lecturer  on  Medical  Jurisprudence  gives  Prizes  in  the 
Summer  Course  amounting  to  £5. 

All  the  Professorial  awards  are  open  to  Extern  as  well  as 
Colleire  Students. 

Sessional  Examinations  in  Anatomy  are  held  at  which  Honor 
Certificates  are  awarded  to  those  candidates  who  show  sufficient 
merit. 

MUSEUMS. 

The  Museums  of  Zoologj*  and  Comparative  Anatomy,  of 
Pathology,  of  Materia  Medica,  and  of  Botany,  are  open  to  the 
Students  of  the  School  of  Physic  for  the  purpose  of  Education. 


1. — MUSRDM    OF   ZOOLOOr    AND   COMPARATIVE    ANATOMY. 

Director — J.  Bronte  Gatenpt.  D.Sc,  D.Phil.,  Professor  of 
Zoology  and  Comparative  Anatomy. 

The  present  building  was  completed  in  1876,  and  contains  the 
Zoological  Collection  formerly  kept  in  the  Regent  House  ;  and  the 
Comparative  Anatomy  Collection,  formerly  combined  with  that  of 
Pathology,  and  kept  in  the  Medical  School. 

The  Zoological  Museum  was  founded  in  1777,  and  contains  a 
large  series  of  typical  specimens.  The  Mammals,  Birds,  and 
Reptiles  are  arranged  on  the  ground-floor.  The  Amphibians 
and  Fishes  are  in  the  gallery.  The  Invertebrates  are  arranged 
in  the  table  cases,  with  the  exception  of  the  Insects,  which 
are  in  cabinets  in  the  Curator's  room.  The  centre  of  the 
hall  is  occupied  by  the  skeletons  of  large  Mammals  and  Birds. 
The  Galleries  contain  the  Anatomical  collection,  and  a  set  of 
Microscopes,  under  which  are  arranged  specimens,  specially  in- 
tended for  the  Students  attending  the  Lectures  in  Zoology  during 
the  Summer  Session. 

There  is  a  Zoological  Laboratory  in  connexion  with  the 
Zoological  Department,  to  which  Students  are  admitted  during 
Term  on  payment  of  a  Fee  of  5«.  for  the  Junior,  and  6s.  8d.  for 
the  Senior  Division  per  Term.  The  Laboratory  is  provided 
with  Microscopes  and  Appliances,  and  Students  are  supplied 
with  specimens. 

The  Museum  is  open  to  Students  dailv  from  11  a.m.  to  4  p.m. 
n3 

/ 


274  scaooL  OF  rnysic. 

II. — MUSEUM  OP  SUKGICAL  AND  MEDICAL  I'ATHOLOGt. 

Director — Thomas  E.  Goudon,  M.15.,  Professor  of  Surgery. 

This  Museum  is  intended  for  the  use  of  the  Students  in  Medicine, 
and  to  illustrate  the  Professors'  Lectures.  It  is  open  dailv  to 
Students  from  11  a.m.  to  4  p.m. 

III. — MUSEUM  oy  materia  .mkdica. 

Curator — Thomas  G.  Moormead.  M.D..  King's  Professor  of 
Materia  Medica  and  Pharmacj . 

A  Course  of  Demonstrations  on  Practical  Pharmacy  will  be  given 
in  the  Museum  of  Materia  Medica.  Each  Student  will  be  provided 
with  apparatus  and  tests. 

The  Museum  is  open  to  Students  from  11  a.m.  to 4  p.m. 

IV.— anthropometric  museum  and  labokatort. 

The  Museum  forms  a  portion  of  the  Department  of  Anatomy, 
and  is  in  the  charge  of  the  Professor  of  Anatomy.  Visitors  are 
admitted  on  application. 

V.  —  herbarium. 

Keeper  of  the  Herbariu7n. — Henry  H.  Dixon,  Sc.D.,  F.K.S. 

The  Herbarium  is  open  for  reference  during  Term,  from  11 
till  3  ;  and  at  other  times  on  special  application  to  the  Keeper. 

It  contains — 

1.  A  Herb.irium.  containing  the  Plants  indigenous  to  Great 
Britain  and  Ireland. 

2.  A  General  Herbarium,  open  to  receive  the  Plants  of  all  cout- 
tries.  This  latter  is  particularly  rich*  in  the  Plants  of  North 
America  (including  Mexico  and  California),  British  India.  South 
Africa,  and  Australia :  and  less  so  in  those  of  South  America. North 
Asia,  and  parts  of  Europe. 

Donations  of  specimens  from  all  countries  are  solicited  from 
Students  of  the  University. 

The  Board  allows  an  annual  sum  for  the  support  of  the 
Herbarium. 

Botanic  Gardens. 
Director— R.  H.  DixoN,  ScD.,  F.R.S. 

The  Gardens  are  situated  about  one  mile  from  the  College,  near 
Ball's  Bridge,  and  now  contain  about  eight  acres  of  ground. 

Since  their  inception  in  1806,  the  Gardens  have  been  added 
to  in  1832  and  in  1848. 


MtTSEPMS.  275 

The  inner  or  original  Garden  contains  a  well-arranged  col- 
lection of  the  nrincipal  Natural  Orders  of  hardy  plants  for 
teaching  purposes,  and  there  are  also  heated  plant-houses  in  which 
choice  and  tender  exotics  are  grown. 

A  small  pond  is  utilised  for  the  growth  of  aquatic  and  marsh 
plants,  and  there  are  borders  of  rock-edging  of  considerable  extent, 
on  which  herbaceous,  Alpine,  and  bulbous  plants  are  grown. 

Classes  for  Students  in  Arts  and  Medicine  are  held  in  the 
Gardens  as  occasion  arises.  Strangers  to  Dublin  are  admitted 
by  orders  from  the  Provost,  or  from  any  of  the  Fellows,  or 
Professors. 

For  the  conditions  under  which  keys  giving  admission  to  the 
Gardens  are  granted  to  residents  in  Dublin,  application  should  be 
made  to  the  Director. 

MAEY    LOUISA    PllENTICK   MONTGOMEEY   LECTURESHIP   IN 
OPHTHALMOLOGY. 

This  Lectureship  was  founded  in  1915  by  tlie  bequest  of  Robert 
John  Montgomery,  M.B.,  F.R.C.S.l.  The  conditions  of  tenure 
(which  may  be  modified  from  time  to  time)  are  the  following: — 

I.  Tiie  Lecturer  shall  be  appointed  for  one  year,  and  shall  be  eligible 
for  le-appointment  year  by  year    for  a  period  not  to  exceed  five  years. 

II.  The  appointment  shall  be  made  for  the  first  five  years  by  the 
Board  of  Trinity  College,  Dublin,  after  they  have  considered  a  report 
from  the  8latf  of  the  School  of  Physic  on  the  merits  of  the  candidates. 
For  the  next  five  years  the  appointment  shall  rest  with  the  President, 
Vice-President,  and  Council  of  the  Royal  College  of  Surgeons  in 
Ireland,  after  consideration  of  a  leport  drawn  up  by  the  Staff  of  the 
School  of  Surgery  on  the  merits  of  the  candidates. 

III.  The  Lecturer  shall  give  one  or  more  formal  lectures  in  each  year 
to  the  members  of  the  Medical  Profession  and  Medical  Students  in 
Dublin,  upon  a  subject  connected  with  Ophthalmology  to  which  he  has 
devoted  his  attention  during  the  previous  year. 

IV.  Candidates  for  election,  and  those  seeking  re-election,  are 
expected  to  state  in  what  centre,  and  in  what  branch  of  the  subject, 
they  propose  to  study  during  a  portion  of  the  year. 


SIR  PATRICE  DUK'S  HOSPITAL. 

Consulting  Physicians John   Mallet   Purser,    Sc.D.,   M.D.,    Regius 

Professor  of  Physic. 
John  Magee  Finny,  M.D. 
Walter  George  Smitii,  M.D. 
Physicians. — Sir  James  Craig,   M.l).,  King's  Professor  of  Practice  of 
Medicine. 
Henry  C.  Drury,  M.D. 

T.  Henry  Wilson,  M.A.,  King's  Profefssorof  Midwifery. 
T.    G.    Moorhead,    M.D.,    King's   Professor  of   Materia 
Medica  and  Pharmacy. 


276  SCHOOL  OP  PHYSIC, 

Surgeons.— Sir  William  Taylor,  K.B.E.,  C.B.,  M.D.,  Regius  Professor 
of  Surgery. 
Sir  Arthur  Ball,  Bart.,  M.D. 

Pathologist.— ¥,.  C.  Smith,  M.B. 

Surgeon  to  Department  for  Throat,  Nose,  and  Ear. — Sir  Robt.  H.  "Woods. 
M.Ch.,  Honorary  Professor  of  Laryngology  and 
Otology. 

Assistant  Fhysician. — Edward  J.  "Watson,  M.D. 

Assistant  Surgeons. — Edward  D'A.  M'Crea,  M.D.,  M.Ch. 
Frederick  Gill,  M.B. 

X-Kay  Lepartment. — Edward  J.  Watson,  M.D. 

AntBsthetist.—W.  C.  P.  Smyly,  M.D. 

House  Surgeon. — Margaretta  T.  Stevenson,  M.B. 

Dentist.— Z.  I.  Kelly,  M.Dent.Sc. 


SCHOOLS  AND  HOSPITALS  RECOGNIZED  BY  THE 
BOARD  OF  TRINITY  COLLEGE. 

The  following  Dublin  Hospitals,  in  addition  to  Sir  P.  Dun's 
Hospital,  are  recognized  by  the  Board  of  Trinity  College : — 

General  Hospitals. 


Adelaide  Hospital. 
Royal  City  of  Dublin  Hospital. 
Dr.  Steevens'  Hospital 
Jervis-street  Infirmary. 
Mater  Misericordiae  Hosnital. 


Mercer's  Hospital. 

Meath  Hospital. 

Richmond,    Whitworlh,    and 

Hardwicke  Hospitals. 
St.  Vincent's  Hosoitai. 


Ophthalmic  Hospital. 
Royal  Victoria  Eye  and  Ear  Hospital. 

Midwifery  Hospitals, 

Rotunda.  I      National  Maternity. 

Coombe.  | 

Hospitals  for  Study  of  Mental  Disease. 

Grangegorman  Mental  Hospital.  |      Swift's. 

Courses  of  instruction  taken  at  the  Medical  Schools  of  the 
following  institutions  are  recognized  by  the  Board  of  Trinitv 
College  as  qualifying  for  admission  to  the  examinations  in  the 
School  of  Physic,  if  equivalent  to  the  Courses  given  therein, 
provided  that  no  student  be  permitted  to  take  any  ot  the  Degrees 
in  Medicine,  Surgery,  or  Midwifery,  unless  he  has  attended  at 
least  three  of  the  necessary  five  years  in  the  School  of  Phvsic, 
Trinity  College,  taken  the  courses  of  those  three  years,  and  passed 


RBCOGIJITION   OF  OTHKR  SCHOOLS. 


S77 


the  Intermediate  Medical,  Part  I,  and  all  subsequent  Examina- 
tions : — 


The  Eoj'al  College  of  Surgeons 

in  Ireland. 
The  Queen's  University,  Belfast. 
The  University  ('ollege  of  South 

Wales  and  Monmoutltshire. 
The  University  of  Adelaide. 
The  University  of  Bombay. 
The  University  of  Calcutta. 


The  University  of  Lahore. 
The  M'Gill  University,  Montreal. 
The  University  of  Madras. 
The  University  of  Melbourne. 
The  University  of  Otago. 
The  University  of  Sydney. 
The  University  of  Toronto. 
The  University  of  Capetown. 


For  special  terms  of  admission  of  Students  from  South  Africa, 
see  pages  82-84. 

For  the   Exhibition    awarded    to   Graduates   in   Medicine  of 
Melbourne  University,  see  page  85. 


RECOGNITION    BY    THE    UNIVERSITY    OF    TEACHING 
INSTITUTIONS  WITHIN  THE  BRITISH  DOMINIONS. 

Recognition  of  Courses,   in  the  case  of  Students  of  Medicine,    taken  at 
Universities  and  Colleges  of  the  British  Dominions. 

The  Board  and  Council  are  prepared,  in  the  case  of  students  of 
medicine,  to  consider  applications  from  Dominion  Universities  and 
Colleges  for  recognition  of  courses  of  instruction  given  by  Ihem  if 
the  following  regulations  are  complied  with : — 

1.  The  application  for  recognition  shall  be  made  to  the  Registrar 
of  the  College,  and  shall  supply  information  under  the  following 
headings : — 

(a)  The  names  of  the  subjects  for  the  teaching  of  M'hich  recognition 
is  sought. 

(A)  The  names  of  the  teachers  in  each  subject  whose  courses  are  to  be 
recognized,  a  note  of  their  university  degrees,  or  other  qualifi- 
cations, and  a  statement  of  their  published  work.  Particulars 
regarding  the  opportunities  which  each  teacher  has  had  of  quali- 
fying himself  for  the  M'ork  which  he  undertakes,  and  of  the 
length  of  time  during  which  he  has  devoted  himself  to  the 
teaching  of  his  subject,  should  be  included. 

(c)  The  names  and  qualifications  of  any  assistants  employed  in  con- 
ducting the  courses  for  which  recognition  is  sought,  and  a  note 
of  the  amount  of  teaching  entrusted  to  each. 

{d)  A  note  of  the  average  number  of  students  attending  the  courses 
under  consideration. 

{e)  A  note  of  the  number  of  lecture  hours  devoted  to  each  course,  of 
the  number  of  written  or  vivd  voce  examinations  held  during 
the  progress  of  the  course,  and  a  clear  statement  of  the  hours 
necessarily  spent  in  practical  class- work  by  the  students  of  each 
subject. 

/ 


278  KECOGNiTION    OF   DOMINION   UNIVERSltlKS. 

(/)  A  detailed  syllabus  of  each  course,  and  a  time-table  showing  the 
hours  at  which  the  various  classes  meet,  and  the  duration  of 
the  courses.  The  fees  charged  ibr  the  courses  of  instruction 
should  also  be  noted. 

{ff)  A  short  description  of  the  accommodation  which  each  teacher  has 
at  his  disposal,  aiid  a  note  of  the  apparatus,  illustrative  museum 
specimens,  diagrams,  and  other  appliances  which  he  has  for  use 
in  his  teaching- work. 

2.  Every  recognized  Institution  shall  at  the  end  of  each  year 
furnish  to  the  liegistrar  of  the  Medical  School  of  Trinity  College 
a  statement  showing  : — 

{a)  The  number  of  students  who  have  attended  each  of  the  it  cognized 
courses  in  a  satisfactory  manner. 

(J)  A  clear  statement  of  any  changes  which  it  is  proposed  to  introduce 
regarding  the  conduct  of  the  courses  for  next  session. 

(c)  A  note  of  any  changes  made  during  the  year,  or  proposed  to  be 
made,  in  the  personnel  of  the  teaching  staff  responsible  for  the 
recognized  courses. 

3.  A  certificate  of  attendance  on  a  recognized  course  can  only 
be  accepted  if  it  clearly  states  that  the  student  has  satisfactorily 
performed  the  work  of  the  class.  The  certificate  must  also  show 
the  number  of  attendances  made  by  the  student,  and  the  total 
number  of  possible  attendances.  In  each  certiticate,  attendance 
upon  practical  class-work,  lectures,  and  class- examinations 
should  be  distinguished. 

4.  The  University  shall,  if  it  thinks  fit,  defer  recognition  until 
an  inspection  has  been  made  of  the  accommodation,  apparatus, 
and  teaching-appliances  of  the  Institution  making  application. 

5.  A  recognition  once  granted  may  be  withdrawn,  or  suspended, 
at  any  time,  should  the  University  deem  such  action  desirable. 

6.  No  recognition  of  courses  granted  under  this  scheme  will 
exempt  a  student  wishing  to  take  the  degree  of  the  University  of 
Dublin  from  spending  at  least  three  full  years  of  Medical  study 
in  Trinity  College. 

Applications  from  individual  students  for  recognition  of  courses 
taken  by  them  in  Colonial  Universities  or  Colleges  shall,  a? 
hitherto,  be  decided  on  by  the  Board  of  Trinity  College  after 
consultation  with  the  Medical  School  Committee,  and  the  Tutors' 
Committee. 


DATB3  OF  EXAMINATIOKS.  279 

DATES  OF  EXAMINATIONS. 
Schools  of  Physic  and  Dental  Science. 


Notice  of  intention  to  enter  for  any  Examination  must  be 
•jiven  to  the  Registrar  of  the  School  of  Physic,  on  the  printed 
forms  provided,  not  less  than  Jourieen  clear  days  befott  the  Exami- 
nation begins.  A  Tardy  Kntry  Fee  of  2«.  6d.  for  each  working 
day  in  arrear  will  be  charged  up  to  a  maximum  of  six  days,  after 
which  no  entry  can  be  received. 

CertiKcates,  when  required,  and  fees,  when  due,  are  to  be 
presented  or  paid  when  entering  for  an  Examination :  if  this  be 
not  done,  the  entry  will  not  be  received. 

The  following  Table  gives  the  dates  at  which  the  Examinatinns 

begin :  — 

Entrance  Examination  in  Arts  for  Medical  Students — Monday,  October 
2,  1922;   Monday,  March  19,  Monday,  October  1,  1923. 

Special  Preliminary  in  Arts  for  Meiiical  Students — Wednesday,  October 
4,    1922;  Wednesday,  March  21,  Wednesday,  O.tober  3,  1923. 

Preliminary  Scientific  Medical  and  Preliminary  Scientific  Dental — 
Monday,  October  2,  1922  ;  Monday,  June  18,  Monday,  October  1, 
1923. 

Preliminary  Scientific  (Botany  and  Zoology  oidy) — Monday,  iftarcb  5. 

(Physics  and  Chemistry  only) — Monday,  March  12,  1923. 
Intermediate  Medical  Examination — 

Part  1. — Monday,  October  2,   1922;   Monday,  March  5,  Monday, 

June  18,  Monday,  October  1,  1923. 
Part  II. — Monday,  October  2,  1922;  Monday,  March  12,  Monday, 
June  25,  Monday,  October  1,  1923. 

Intermediate  Dental  Examination — 

Monday,  October  2,  1922  ;  Monday,  March  6,  Monday,  June  18, 
Monday,  October  1,  1923. 

Final  Medical  Examination — 

Part  I. — Monday,  October  9,  1922;   Monday,  March  12,  Monday, 

June  18,  Monday,  October  8,  1923. 
Part  II. — Medicine,  Monday,  December  4,  1922  ;  Monday,  March 
5,  Monday,  June  11,  Monday,  December  3,  1923. 
Surgery,  Monday,  November  27,  1922  ;   Monday,  March 

12,  Monday,  June  4,  Monday,  November  26,  1923. 
Midwifery,    Monday,    November  27,    1922  ;    Monday, 
March  19,  Monday,  June  4,  Monday,  November  26, 
1923. 


280  SCHbOt   OF  PftTSlC. 

Examination  for  B.  Dent.  Sc.  Degree  and  M.  Dent.  So.  Degree- 
Monday,  November  27,  1922  ;  Monddj-,  March  12,  Monday,  June 
4,  Monday,  Novemoer  26,  1923. 

Examination  for  M.  A.  0.  Degree — 

Monday,  November  27,  1922;  Monday,  March  19,  Monday,  June  4, 
Monday,  November  26,  1923. 

Examination  for  M.Ch.  Degree — 

Monday,  November  27,  1922  :  Monday,  March  12,  Monday,  June  4, 
Monday,  November  26,  1923. 

Examination  for  Diploma  in  Public  Health — 

Part    I.— Monday,  October  9,  1922;   Monday,  March  5,  Mondny, 

June  18,  Monday,  October  8,  1923. 
Part  II.— Thursday,    October   12,    1922 ;     Thursday,    March    8, 

Thursday,  June  21,  Thursday,  October  11,  1923. 

KXAMINATIONS   FOR    PRIZKS. 

Begley  Studentship— See  page  272. 

Kingsinill  Jones  Memorial  Prize— See  page  272. 

Medical  Scholarships — 

Chemistry,  Physics,  Botany,  and  Zoology,  Monday,  June  18,  1923. 

Anatomy  and  Physiology,  Monday,  June  18,  1923. 
Dr.  Henry  Hutchinson  Stewart  Medical  Scholarship — See  page  270. 

The  John  Mallet  Purser  Medal  — 

Awarded  (or  Physiology  and  Histology  at  the  Intermediate  Medical, 
Part  I.,  in  June. 

The  Daniel  John  Cunningham  Medal — 

Awarded  for  Anatomy  at  the  Intermediate  Medical,  Part  I.,  in  June. 

Fitzpatrick  Scholarship- 
Awarded  annually  to  the  Student  who  obtains  the  highest  aggregate 
marks  at  Part  II.  of  the  Intermediate,  and  Parts  I.  and  II.  of 
the  Final  Medical  Examinations. 
Medical   Travelling   Prize,   and   Banks    Medal  and   Prixe — Monday, 
June  11,  1923. 


(     281     ) 

SCHOOL   OF    ENGINEERING. 

T  K  A  c  H  I N  G    Staff. 
I.  — Mathematics. 

R.  A.  P.  Rogers,  m.a.,  Fellow  and  Tutor  of  Trinity  College,  Dublin, 
and  Donegal  Lecturer  in  Mathematics  in  the  University  of  Dublin. 

II . — Mechanics. 

J.  Fkaseu,  M.A.,  Fellow  and  Tutor  of  Trinity  College,  Dublin,  and 
Assistant  to  the  Professor  of  Natural  Philosophy  in  the  University 
of  Dublin. 

III. — Exjierimental  Physics. 

W.  E.  Thuift,  M.A.,  HON.  M.  INST.  C.E.I. ,  M.i.pi.K. ;  Fcllow  of  Trinity 

College,   Dublin,  and   Erasmus   Smith  Professor  of  Natural  and 

Experimental  Philosophy  in  the  University  of  Dublin. 

Hat  1  V  T      t  )  Assistants  to  the  Erasmus  Smith  Pro- 

T   XT    T   T>        '    •   •'  ^•'^-  •   •  \     fessor  of  Natural  and   Experimental 

J.  H.  J.  P00I,E,  SC.D.  (        T),  .,  ,  ^ 

'  )      Philosophy. 

IV. —  Chemistry. 

Sydney  Young,  m.a.,   sc.d.,   f.k.s..   Professor  of  Chemistry  in  the 

University  of  Dublin. 
K.  Werneh,  M.A  ,  sc.d.,  f.i.c,  F.C.8.L.,  Professof  of  Applied  Chemistry. 
W.  C.  Ramsdkn,  m.a.,  f.c. 8. 1..,  Assistant  to  the  Professor  of  Chemistry. 

V. —  Geology,  I'elruloyy,  Mineraloyy,  and  Mining. 

John  Joly,  h  a.,  b.a.i.,  sc.d.,  f.r.s.,  Professor  of  Geology  and 
Mineralogy  in  the  University  of  Dublin. 

VI. —  Engineering. 

David  Ci.auk,  b.sc.  (Etig.,  Lond.),  m.inst.c.e.,  m.inst.c.k.i., 
A.M.AM.soc.c.E.,  Profcssor  of  Civil  Engineering  in  the  University 
of  Dublin. 

W.  E.  LiI-LY,  M.A.I. ,  SCI).,   M.INST.C.E.I.,  \ 

J.  T.Yac"kson,^m.a.i.,  M.A.,  M.IN8T.C.E.I.,  ^^'«'f  f,'?*?,  %  ^^^  Professor 
A.M.IN8T.C.E.,  .     of  Cml  Engineering. 

S.   C.  BlAIK,  B.A.I.,  / 

VII. — Electrical  Engineering . 

Wm.  Tatlow,  B.A.I.,  M.I.E.E.,  Lecturer  in  the  Praclice  of  Electrical 
Engineering. 

Lecturer  in  Electric  Traction. 
G.  M.  Haiuiiss,  M.I.E.K.,  Generiil  Manager,  D.  U.  Tramways  Co. 

VIII. — Mechanical  Engineei  ing. 
W.    E.    Lilly,   m.a.i.,   sc.d.,    \vh.   ex.,    m.inst.c.k.i.,    m.i.mech.e., 
Ledurer  in  Mechanical  Engineering. 


282  SCHOOL  OF  ENGINEERING. 

Introductory^ 

The  School  of  Engineering  in  the  University  of  Dublin  was 
established  in  the  year  1842  for  the  purpose  of  affording  to  such 
Students  as  intend  becoming  Civil  Engineers  systematic  instruc- 
tion in  those  branches  of  knowledge  which  are  most  useful  to  the 
Engineer  in  the  practice  of  his  profession. 

While  keeping  this  object  in  view,  it  has  been  deemed  advisable 
to  require  the  Student,  during  his  Course  in  the  School,  to  be  a 
member  of  Trinity  College,  and  subject  to  its  regular  discipline, 
giving  him  at  the  same  time  the  opportunity  of  obtaining  the 
advantages  of  a  general  University  Education. 

Membership  of  I'rinity  College, 

In  order  to  become  a  member  of  the  College,  it  is  necessary  to 
pass  the  Entrance  Examination,  and  pay  the  Entrance  Fee  of 
£15. 

The  Course  for  this  Examination  is  given  in  the  Calendar, 
p.  31,  or  in  the  Shorter  Programme,  p.  2.  The  dates  at  which  it 
is  held  are  given  in  the  Calendar,  pp.  1*  to  5*,  or  in  the  Shorter 
Programme,  p.  2. 

Admission  to  the  School  of  Engineering, 

Having  thus  become  a  member  of  the  College,  the  Student  is 
eligible  for  admission  to  the  School  of  Engineering,  which  is 
obtained  by  his  passing  a  further  Examination  (in  the  subjects 
enumerated  below),  held  annually  at  the  end  of  Trinity  and  also 
at  the  beginning  of  Michaelmas  Term,  at  which  period  of  the 
year  only  can  a  Student  join  the  classes.  Students  intending  to 
enter  must  be  at  the  Engineering  School  at  10  o'clock  on  the  day 
fixed  in  the  Almanac. 

Subjects  for  Entrance  Examination  to  Engineering  School. 

Arithmetic. 

Algebra  (to  the  end  of  Quadratic  Equations). 

Geometry  (Euclid,  first  six  Books). 

Trigonometry  (to  the  end  of  Solution  of  Plane  TriarRle-i). 

Elementary  Mechanics. 

Upon  passing  this  E-xamination  the  Candidate  is  admitted  to  the 
School,  and  begins  his  studies  in  it. 

Duration  and  Subjects  of  Professional  Course. 

The  Professional  Course  continues  for  three  or  four  years,  as 
explained  below,  from  the  time  of  entering  the  School,  during 


SCHOOL   OK   KNQINEKRING.  283 

which  instruction  is  given  partly  by  Lectures,    and   partly  in 
Laboratories  and  in  the  Field,  being  arranged  thus : — 

First  Yeah  (Juniok  Class). 
Mathematics. 
Mechanics. 

Experimental  Physics. 
Chemistry. 

Elementary  Geology  and  Mineralogy. 
Elementary  Surveying. 
Drawing  and  Practical  Geometry. 

Second  Yeau  (Miudle  Class). 

Practical  Mechanics. 

Theory  of  the  Steam  Engine. 

Chemistry — Analyses  of  Ores,  Minerals,  &c. 

Elementary  Geology. 

S'uveying  and  Field  Work. 

Design  of  Structures  and  Materials  of  Construction. 

Drawing,  Designing,  and  OflSce  Work. 

Electrical  Engineering. 

Thikd  Yeah  (Seniok  Class). 

Mineralogy,  Petrology,  Field  Geology,  and  Mining. 

Design  of  Structures. 

Foundations,  R'lads  and  Riiilways,  Harbours  and  Docks. 

Hydraulics,  VV^aterworks,  ami  Sewerage. 

Practical  Design  and  Field  Work. 

Electrical  Engineering  and  Mechanical  Engineering. 

Fourth  Year  (Optional). 
Civil  Engineering. 
Electrical  and  Mechanical  Engineering. 

The  optional  fourth  year  Course  has  been  instituted  with  a 
view  to  covering  more  advanced  work  iu  Civil,  Electrical,  and 
Meclianical  Engineering.  Particulars  of  the  Course  may  be 
obtained  on  application. 

Students  wishing  to  make  a  special  study  of  Electrical 
Engineering  are  recommended  to  do  so  in  the  fourth  year.  The 
Electrical  Kngineering  Course  includes  a  series  of  lectures  on  the 
Development  of  Hydro-Electric  Power  Staticms  and  on  the  Design 
and  Construction  of  Traiisraission  Lines.  These  lectures  run  in 
conjunction  with  a  Civil  Engineering  Course  on  Hydro-Electric 
Engineering. 

Students  taking  the  ordinary  three  years'  Course  are  allowed 
to  specialise  during  part  of  the  third  year,  and  to  present  them- 
selves accordingly  in  special  Papers  at  the  Final  B.A.I.  Kxaniiua- 
tion :  those  who  may  wish  to  devote  themselves  to  the  ordinary 


284  SCttOOL  OV  ENHINEEMNC. 

Civil  Engineering  work  being  required  to  study  only  a  certain 
part  ot  the  Electrical  Engineering  work,  and  to  take  at  the  1$.A  I. 
Examination  a  certain  part  of  the  Electrical  Engineering  Exami- 
nation in  addition  to  the  full  Civil  Engineering  Examination  ; 
and  those  who  may  wish  to  devote  themselves  to  ]*^lectrical 
Engineering  being  allowed  to  substitute  the  Electrical  Engineer- 
ing Lectures  and  Demonstrations  of  the  Lecturer  in  the  Practice 
of  Electrical  Engineering,  for  certain  parts  of  the  Civil  Engineer- 
ing work,  as  arranged  by  the  Professor  of  Civil  Engineering,  and 
to  be  allowed  to  substitute  the  Electrical  Engineering  Examina- 
tion for  two  of  the  Papers  set  by  the  Professor  of  Civil  Engineering 
at  the  H.A.I.  Examination  :  the  Drawing  of  Students  thus 
specialising  will  be  arranged  so  as  to  be  suited  to  their  Electrical 
Engineering  work  as  far  as  possible. 

Examinations. 

At  the  end  of  the  Trinity  Term,  in  each  year,  the  Junior  and 
Middle  Classes  are  examined  as  to  their  proficiency  in  the  subjects 
they  have  been  lectured  in  previously  ;  and  no  Student  can  rise 
from  a  lower  to  a  higher  Class  except  he  shall  havejirst  obtained 
credit  for  the  necessary  attendance  at  the  Lectures  delivered  to 
his  Class,  and  at  Laboratory  and  Field  "Work  and  in  the  Drawing 
School,  during  each  of  the  three  Terms  of  the  Academic  Year 
then  closing,  and  also  have  passed  the  Examination  at  the  end 
in  the  Trinity  Term  above  mentioned  or  a  Supplemental  Exami- 
nation at  the  beginning  of  the  following  Michaelmas  Term. 

A  Student  who  has  failed  to  pass  one  of  these  Examinations 
may,  on  payment  of  half  the  Fee  for  the  corresponding  year, 
attend  over  again  the  Lectures  in  the  siibjects  in  which  he  was 
deficient. 

A  part  of  the  regular  Final  (or  Degree)  Examination  of  the 
Senior  Class  is  held  at  the  end  of  Trinity  Term,  and  the  re- 
mainder in  Michaelmas  Term.  There  is  also  a  corresponding 
Supplemental  Examination  at  the  beginning  of  the  next  Trinity 
Term. 

Students  are  required  to  give  notice  to  the  Registrar  of  the 
School  of  their  intention  to  present  themselves  at  any  of  these 
Examinations  at  least  a  week  before  the  commencement  of  the 
Examination,  and  at  the  same  time  to  send  in  their  Drawings, 
&e.,  to  the  Professor  of  Engineering  or  his  Assistant. 

Attendances  at  Lectures,  Sfc. 

In  order  to  obtain  credit  for  attendance  at  Lectures,  a  Student 
must  have  attended  at  least  three-fourths  of  the  Lectures  deli- 
vered to  his  Class  by  each  Lecturer  during  each  of  the  three  Terms 
in  the  Academic  Year. 


SCHOOL  OF  ENGINEERING.  285 

To  obtain  credit  for  Offi,ce  Work,  Sfc,  the  following  attendance 
in  the  Drawing  School  is  necessary  : — 

Middle  Class,  at  least  14  hours  each  week  during  Term. 
Senior  Class,        ,,      16       ,,  ,,  ,, 

That  is,  the  work  done  by  each  Student  in  the  Drawing  School 
from  week  to  week  must  be  equivalent  to  these  numbers  of  hours 
work  in  the  judgment  of  the  Professor  of  Engineering. 

To  obtain  credit  for  Field  Work,  the  Student  must  attend  dur- 
ing the  entire  time  on  at  least  three  out  of  every  four  occasions 
when  the  Professor  of  Engineering  or  his  Assistant  takes  the  Class 
out  for  practical  instruction  in  the  Field. 

And  he  must  further  make  out  and  plot  as  many  Surveys  and 
Sections  as  the  Professor  of  Engineeringmay  consider  it  desirable  to 
require  of  him,  in  order  to  ensure  his  proficiency  in  these  branches. 

The  time  thus  occupied  will  be  credited  to  the  Student  as  if  spent 
in  the  Drawing  School. 

The  hours  spent  at  Arts  Lectures  or  Laboratory  Work  count  as 
half  that  number  of  hours'  attendance  in  the  Drawing  School. 
Notice  must,  however,  be  given  to  the  Assistant  to  the  Professor 
of  Engineering  during  the  hrst  week  of  such  attendance. 

Eighteen  hours'  attendance  is  sufficient  for  the  fortnight  within 
which  a  Student  has  to  pass  an  Arts  Examination,  and  a  similar 
notice  to  that  mentioned  in  the  preceding  paragraph  must  be  given 
in  order  to  obtain  this  remission. 

Certificate  in  Engineering, 

Upon  concluding  the  Senior  Year  of  his  Course,  and  obtaining 
credit  for  the  required  attendance  at  Lectures,  and  at  Field  and 
Office  Work,  the  Student,  after  passing  the  final  Examination, 
will  be  entitled  to  receive  the  Certificate  in  Engineering  granted  by 
the  Professors  of  the  Engineering  School. 

License  in  Engineering. 

A  Student  who  has  not  only  completed  his  Course  in  the  Engi- 
neering School,  but  has  also  completed  the  first  two  years  of  the 
Course  in  Arts,  and  passed  the  Final  Freshman  Examination 
("  Littlego"),  will  be  entitled  to  receive  the  License  in  Engi- 
neering granted  by  the  University. 

Degree  of  Bachelor  in  Engineering. 

A  Student  who  has  not  only  completed  his  Course  in  the  Engi- 
neering School,  but  also  graduated  in  Arts,  will  be  entitled  to 
proceed  to  the  Degree  of  Bachelor  in  Engineering. 


286  SCHOOL  OF    KNGINEERING. 

Degree  of  Master  in  Engineeriny . 

A  Bachelor  in  Engineering,  who  has  been  actually  engaged  upon 
Engineering  Works  for  a  period  of  three  years,  is  entitled  to  pro- 
ceed to  the  Degree  of  Master  in  Engineering. 

Diploma  in  Electrical  Engineering. 

A  Course  in  Electrical  and  Mechanical  Engineering  is  provided 
for  those  Students  who  may  study  the  subject  in  the  Optional 
fourth  year,  and  a  Diploma  in  Electrical  Engineering  is  awarded 
to  Students  taking  out  this  Course  satisfactorily. 

Honors  in  the  Engineering  School. 

Honors  are  awarded  at  the  Degree  Examination  by  giving 
Special  Certificates  for  superior  merit  in  each  of  the  following 
subjects : — 

1.  Civil  Engineering. 

2.  [Mechanical  and  Experimental  Physics. 

3.  Mining,  Chemistry,  Geology,  and  Mineralogy. 

4.  Electriciil  Engineering. 

In  the  first  and  fourth.  Honors  are  awarded  on  the  results  of 
the  corresponding  parts  of  the  Degree  Examination;  in  the 
second,  on  the  combined  results  of  Examinations  in  the  sub- 
jects at  the  close  of  the  Junior  and  Middle  Years ;  and  in  the 
third,  on  the  combined  results  of  Examinations  in  Chemistry 
at  the  close  of  the  Junior  and  Middle  Years  ;  in  Elementary 
Geology  at  the  end  of  the  Middle  Year  ;  and  in  Mineralogy, 
Petrology,  Geology,  and  Mining  at  the  Degree  Examination. 

No  private  Certificate  can  be  issued  by  any  Professor  or  Lec- 
turer connected  with  the  School. 

Scale  of  Fees  and  Charges. 
College  Fees. 

Entrance  Fee  to  College  (which  must  be  paid  at  latest 
within  twelve  days  after  his  Entrance  Examination  is 

passed), £15     0     0 

Half-yearly  Fee  for  keeping  name  on  College  Books, 
payable  to  the  Junior  Bursar  before  the  first  Saturday 
in  May  and  the  first  Saturday  in  November,      .         .     10  10     0 

MXGINEERING  ScHOOL  FeES. 

In  addition  to  the  foregoing  College  Fees  for  Entrance 
to  College  and  keeping  name  on  Books,  the  Student 
will  have  to  make  the  following  annual  payments: — 

In  the  Junior  Class £10     0     0 

,,      Middle      ,, £15     0     0 

,,      Senior       ,, £15     0     0 

,,      Optional  fourth  year,*  .         .         .  £15     0     0 

•If  the  Student  paying  this  Fee  be  a  Kraduate,  he  is  not  required  to  continue  paying 
the  or^mai-y  College  half-yearly  Fees. 


SCHOOL  OF  ENGINEEKING.  287 

These  latter  annual  payments  in  the  Engineering  School  should  be 
made  to  the  Junior  Bursar  before  Nov.  20  in  each  year.  After  that  date 
a  fine  <if  5s.  per  week  commenced  is  inflicted,  and  after  two  weeks  tlie 
names  of  all  Students  w'nose  Fees  are  then  unpaid  are  removed  from  the 
books  of  the  Engineering  School, _ 

Students  in  Engineering  requiring  to  use  the  Drawing  School  only, 
may  do  so  on  payment  of  £5  for  the  half-yenr  in  which  they  use  it. 

The  Fee  for  the  License  in  Engineering  or  for  the  Degree  of  Bachelor 
in  Engineering  is  £1. 

The  Fee  for  the  Degree  of  Master  in  Engineering  is  £10. 

A  Fee  of  10s.  is  payable  on  taking  out  the  Testimonium  of  the  Degree 
of  Master  in  Engineering. 

All  the  Fees  are  payable  to  the  Junior  Bur8ar,except  those  for  Licenses 
and  Degrees  in  Engineering,  which  are  payable  to  tlie  Senior  Proctor. 

A  Student  in  the  Engineering  School  may,  should  he  so  desire,  pursue 
his  Course  in  Arts  at  the  same  time,  without  having  to  pay  any  further 
Fees  than  those  already  specified. 

Students  who  have  passed  the  B.A.  Degree  Examination  need  not 
pay  the  half-yearly  CoUgge  Fee  in  May  of  their  Senior  Year,  as  their 
names  are  kept  on  the  College  books  till  the  end  of  June.  Such  Students 
must  pay  a  liceat  ad  examinandum  fee  of  one  guinea  and  the  ordinary 
replacement  fee  of  15s.  before  entering  for  their  final  Engineering 
Examination. 

Labor atoftcs  and  Museums,  J|-c. 

Attached  to  the  School  there  are  large  Laboratories,  Museums, 
and  a  Model  lloom,  containing  numerous  valuable  models  of 
iCngiueering  Works  and  Machinery,  which  are  of  great  assistance 
to  the  Students  in  pursuing  their  studies. 

Syllabus  of  the  Course. 

The  instruction  given  to  the  Students  by  the  different  Pro- 
fessors and  Lecturers  connected  with  the  School  is  arranged  as 
follows,  subject  to  such  modifications  and  alterations  as  the 
circumstances  require : — 

I. — Mathematics. 

The  Lecturer  in  Mathematics  delivers  about  90  Lectures  to  the  Stu- 
dents, during  the  first  year  of  their  Course,  upon  the  following  subjects  :  — 

1.  Plane  Trigonometry,  and  the  nature  and  use  of  Logarithms. 

2.  Differential  Calculus. 

3.  Integral  Calculus  and  Mensuration,  &c. 

II. — Mechanics,  &c. 
The  Lectures  and  Demonstrations  upon  Mechanics  and  Mechanism, 
Hydrostatics,  &c.,  extend  over  the  first  two  years,  and  reach  the  num- 
ber of  about  120,  the  subjects  treated  of  being — 
In  the  Junior  Year- — 
Theoretical  Mechanics. 
Demonstrations  with  practical  instruction  in  Elementary  Mechanics. 


288  SCHOOL    OF  BNGINEEKING. 

In  the  Middle  Year — 

Applied  Mechanics,  including  Kinematics  of  Machines. 
DeiHonstrations  with  practical  instruction  in  Experimental  Mechanics 
and  Mechanism. 

III. — Experimental  Physics. 

The  Erasmus  Smith  Professor  of  Experimental  Physics  and  his 
assistants  deliver  about  52  Lectures  to  the  Junior  Class,  30  to  the  Middle 
Class,  and  20  to  the  Senior  Class,  on  the  subjects  enumerated  below  :— 

To  the  Junior  Class. 
Heat. 

Electricity  and  Magnetism. 
Sound  and  Light. 

To  the  Middle  Class. 

The  Theory  of  the  Steam  Engine. 
Electrical  Engineering. 

The  Steam  Engine  Lectures  are  delivered  to  the  Middle  Class  in 
Mifluielmas  Term,  the  practical  work  thereon  is  carried  out  in  Hilary 
Term,  and  the  Preliminary  Theoretical  Lectures  in  Electrical  Engineer- 
ing by  the  Professor  of  Experimental  Physics  are  delivered  in  Trinity 
Term. 

To  the  Senior  Class. 

Electrical  Engineering. 

The  Professor  of  Experimental  Physics  concludes  his  Course  of  Lec- 
tures in  Electrical  Engineering  in  the  Michaelmas  Term  of  the  Senior 
year,  and  all  Students  are  required  to  attend  this  Course.  The  Lecturer 
in  the  Practice  of  Electrical  Engineering  gives  such  of  his  Demonstrations 
as  he  considers  necessary  for  all  Students  in  Michaelmas  Term ;  the  Special 
Electrical  Engineering  Lectures  and  Demonstrations  are  given  in  Hilary 
and  Trinity  Terms. 

Six  Lectures  and  Demonstrations  on  the  Dublin  United  Electrical 
Tramways  system  are  given  by  the  Lecturer  in  Electric  Traction. 

In  addition  to  these  Lectures,  the  Students  are  given  Courses  ol 
Laboratory  Instruction  in  Pliysical  Measurements,  and  in  studying  the 
electrical  installation. 

The  Students  can,  at  any  period  of  their  Course,  take  out  special 
Courses  of  practical  instruction  in  Physical  Measurements. 

IV. — Chemistry. 

The  Professor  of  Chemistry's  Lectures  and  Demonstrationa  are  the 
following : — 

Junior  Class, 

Lectures. — On  three  days  in  each  week  during  Michaelmas  and  Hilarj 
Terms.  As  part  of  the  Course,  the  Students  conduct  Experiments  ii 
one  of  the  Laboratories,  which  relate,  as  far  as  possible,  to  the  processejj 
and  materials  concerned  in  the  Arts  of  Construction. 


tai 


SCHOOL  OF  ENGINEERING,  289 


Middle  Class. 

Laboratory  Practice. — During  four  hours  in  each  week,  from  No- 
vember to  March,  inclusive.  The  Course  of  Instruction  comprises  the 
(iualitative  and  Quantitative  Analysis  of  Metallic  Ores  and  Minerals, 
Assays  of  Metals,  Testing  Cements,  estimation  of  Carbon  in  Iron  and 
Steel,  Analysis  of  Water,  of  Fuels,  and  of  Furnace  Gases,  &c.  In 
addition  (during  Hilary  Term),  Lectures  are  given  on  Metallurgical 
Processes,  open  to  members  of  both  Classes. 


V. — Mineralogy,  Petrology,  Geology,  and  Mining. 

The  Junior  Class  attend  in  Trinity  Term  a  Course  of  Lectures  intro- 
ductory to  the  Sciences  of  Mineralogy  and  Geology  in  so  far  as  these 
concern  the  Engineer.  In  these  the  Student  is  instructed  in  the  nature 
and  properties  of  the  more  important  minerals  and  rock-forming  sub- 
stances. The  Examination,  which  is  held  in  June,  is  entirely  practical, 
the  Student  being  expected  to  identify  and  pronounce  on  the  nature  of 
such  minerals  and  rocks  as  have  been  submitted  to  him  in  the  Course  of 
the  Lectures. 

The  Middle  Class  attend  in  Michaelmas  Term  a  Course  of  Lectures 
in  General  Geology.  This  Course  (which  is  also  open  to  Arts  Students 
and  to  the  Public)  is  prefaced  by  a  School  Course  of  about  six  Lectures 
recapitulating  and  extending  the  work  done  in  the  Junior  Year. 

The  Course  on  General  Geology  extends  over  about  twenty  Lectures, 
and  embraces  Physiography  and  Physical  Geology. 

At  the  Examination  held  in  May  a  Prize  of  £5  is  awarded  for  the 
best  answering.  The  Examination  is  conducted  in  part  on  paper  and 
is  in  part  practical — Minerals  and  Rock-specimens  being  submitted  for 
identification. 

The  Senior  Class — 

In  Michaelmas  Term  attend  a  Course  of  Lectures  on  the  Mineralogy 
and  Physical  properties  of  the  more  important  Rocks  and  Ruilding 
Stones. 

In  Hilary  Term  a  School  Course  of  about  eleven  Lectures  and 
Demonstrations  on  Building  Stones,  followed  by  a  Course  in  Strati- 
graphical  Geology  and  Paleontology  (open  to  Arts  Students  and  to  the 
Public)  extending  over  about  eighteen  Lectures. 

In  Trinity  Term  a  Course  of  Lectures  on  Applied  Geology,  Ores,  and 
Mining. 

At  intervals,  during  the  year,  the  Class  accompanies  the  Professor  to 
places  of  Geological  interest  in  the  neighbourhood  of  Dublin,  for  practi- 
cal instruction  in  the  Field. 

Candidates  for  the  final  Examination  are  required  to  prepare  an 
original  Geological  Section,  which  must  be  sent  in  to  the  Professor  of 
Geology  at  least  a  week  before  the  final  Examination.  At  this  Exami- 
nation a  Prize  of  £10  is  awarded  on  the  marks  obtained. 

Tlu!  Prizes  in  Geology  and  Mineralogy,  awarded  to  second  and  third 
year's  men,  were  founded  by  the  Board  in  December,  1887. 

0 


290  SCHOOL  OF  ENGINEEEIKG. 

VI. — Enoineeuing. 

During  his  first  year  in  the  School,  the  Student  is  instructed  in  Draw- 
ing by  the  Assistant  to  the  Professor  of  Engineering,  who  delivers  to 
the  Class  three  Courses  of  Lectures,  accompanied  by  Demonstrations 
^one  Course  each  Term),  making  about  120  Lectures  altogether  on  the 
following  subjects :  — 

1.  Use  of  Drawing  Instruments,  Scales,  &c. 

2.  Practical  Examples  in  Plane  Geometry. 

3.  ,,  ,,         in  Conic  Sections. 

4.  Descriptive  Geometry. 

5.  Shadows,  &c. 

6.  Isometric  Projection. 

7.  Machine  Drawing. 

The  work  of  the  junior  year  also  includes  a  short  Course  of  Lectures 
on  Elementary  Surveying  and  Levelling,  with  Field  Work. 

In  the  second  and  third  years,  Practical  Surveying  is  taught  in  the 
Field  by  the  Professor  of  Engineering  and  his  Assistant  ;  and  the 
Student,  when  sufficiently  expert,  is  required  to  perform  various  survey 
operations  without  assistance,  and  to  submit  his  plotted  work. 

Regular  attendance  is  required  in  the  Drawing  School,  where  the 
object  kept  prominently  in  view  is  to  make  the  Student  an  intelligent 
and  efficient  Draughtsman  and  familiar  with  the  Design  of  Bridges, 
Roofs,  and  other  structures,  the  Measurement  of  Quantities,  and  Office 
Work  generally. 

During  the  second  and  third  years.  Lectures  and  Demonstrations, 
with  Practical  Instruction,  are  given  in  Mechanical  and  Electrical 
Engineering,  as  detailed  in  Section  VII. 

In  addition  to  this,  during  the  two  years,  about  230  Lectures  are  deli- 
vered by  the  Professor  of  Engineering  as  follows : — 

To  THE  Middle  Class. 
On  five  days  of  each  week  of  each  Term. 

Surveying. — Traverse  Surveying  by  Theodolite  and  Compass. 
Measurement  of  Areas.  Plane  Table  Surveying.  Tacheometrical 
Surveying,  (iontours  and  Contouring.  Topographical  and  Recon- 
naissance Surveying.  Location  and  Setting  Out  of  Works.  Calculation 
of  Earthwork  Quantities.  Hydrographical  Surveying.  Constiuction 
and  Adjustment  of  Instruments. 

Design  of  Structures. — Graphic  Statics.  Classification  of  Framed 
Structures.  Graphical  and  Analytical  Determination  of  Forces  in 
Framed  Structures.  Bending  Moment  and  Shearing  Force  Diagrams 
for  Fixed  and  Moving  Load  Systems.  Loads.  Wind  Pressure. 
Working  Stresses. 

The  Design  of  Riveted  Joints,  Roof  Trusses,  Beams,  Plate  Girders, 
and  Columns. 

Materials  of  Construction. — Masonry.  Bricks  and  Brickwork.  Limes 
and  Cements.  Concrete.  Reinforced  Concrete.  Timber.  Steel  and 
Iron.     Bitumen  and  Asphalt.     Specifications. 

Text-Books. — Clark,    "  Plane    and    Geodetic    Surveying,"   vol 
Morley  or  Andrews,  "  Theory  of  Structures." 


i 


SCHOOL  OF  ENGINEEBING.  291 

To  THE  Seniok  Class. 
On  Jive  days  of  each  week  of  each  Term. 

Design  of  Structures. — Three-dimensioned  Frames.  Combined  Bend- 
ing and  Direct  Stress.     Influence  Lines. 

The  Design  of  Bridge  Floors.  Continuous  Girders.  Framed  Girders 
of  various  types.  Wind  Bracing  and  Portals.  Arched  Ribs  and  Sus- 
pension Bridges. 

Earth  Pressure.  The  Design  of  retaining  Walls,  Dams,  Weirs,  and 
Masonry  Arches. 

Foundations. — Preliminary  Investigations.  Safe  Pressures.  Calcu- 
lation of  Loads.  Timbered  Trenches.  Cofferdams.  Piling.  Well 
Foiinfiaiions.     Cylinders  and  Caissons. 

Roads  and  Railways. — Location  of  Road  Routes.  Traffic.  Materials 
used  in  R^ad  Making.  Water-bound  Macadam.  Tar  Macadam  and 
other  forms  of  Dustless  Roads.  Stone-Sett,  Wood,  and  Asphalt  Street 
Paving. 

■  Location  of  Railway  Routes.  Parliamentary  and  Contract  Plans  and 
Sections.  Gradients.  Mass  Diagrams.  Setting  Out  Works.  Simple, 
Compound,  Reverse,  and  Transition  Curves.  Execution  of  Earthwork. 
C(mstiuction  of  Retaining  Walls,  Culverts,  IJridges,  \'iaducts,  Covired 
Ways,  an<i  Tunnels.     Permanent  Way. 

Hydraulics. — Flow  of  Water  throiigli  Orifice:",  Mouthpieces,  Notches, 
Pipes,  and  Open  Cbannels.  Stream  Gauging  by  Weir,  Current  Meter, 
Floats,  and  Chemical  metho'ils.  Pelton  Wheels,  Turbines,  and  Pumps. 
Hydraulic  Transmission  of  Energy. 

Waterworks  and  Seuemge. — Sources  of  Water  Supply.  Gathering 
Grounds.  Quality  of  Water.  Calculation  of  Supplr.  Compensation 
Water.     Reservoirs.     Conveyance  and  Distribution  of  Water. 

Preliminary  Investigations  for  Sewerage  Schemes.  Separate  and 
Combined  Systems.  Design  and  Cimstiuction  of  Sewers  and  their 
Accessories.     Sewage  Disposal. 

Harbours  and  Bocks. — Wind,  Waves,  and  Tides.  Coast  Protection. 
Harbour  Design.  Wharves  and  Jetties.  Sea  Walls.  Training  Walls. 
Breakwateis. 

Lay  Out  of  Docks.  Tidal  and  Closed  Basins.  Dock  Walls.  Dock 
Gates.     Graving  and  Pontoon  Docks. 

Text-Books. — Morley  or  Andrews,  "  Theory  of  Structures."  Baker, 
"Masonry  Construction."  Wood,  "Modern  Road  Construction." 
Mills,  "  Railway  Construction."     Lea  or  Gibson,  "  Hydraulics." 

Standard  Text-Books  on  special  branches  of  Civil  Eugineering  covered 
by   the   Syllabus  are  available   for  consultation,  and  copies  may  be 
boiTOwed  from  the  Lending  Library. 
« 

Design. 

Before  proceeding  to  the  Degree  Examination  in  Civil  Engineering, 
each  Candidate  is  required  to  prepare  an  Original  Design  for  a  given 
s\ibject,  or,  alternatively,  tlie  Students  may  form  parties  of  four  or  five, 
and  carry  out  the  Field  Work  and  Design  of  a  Scheme  for  a  short  line 

o2 


292  SCHOOL   OF    KNGINKKKING. 

of  Railway,  Eoad,  or  Canal,  or  any  other  Engineering  project  approved 
of  by  tlie  Professor  of  Engineering.  This  work  is  performed  during  the 
long  vacation,  and  the  Drawing  and  Calculations  must  be  sent  in  to  the 
Professor  of  Engineering  at  least  one  week  before  the  Final  Examina- 
tion. 

VII. — Electkical  Engineeking. 

The  Lectures  of  the  Professor  of  Experimental  Physics  are  on  the 
general  theory  of  Electricity  as  applied  to  Electrical  Engineering. 

The  Lectures  of  the  Lecturer  in  tlie  Practice  of  Electrical  Engineering 
are  on  the  following  subjects:  — 

Generation  of  electric  currents — Continuous  current  dynamos  and 
motors — Transmission  of  power — Alternating  current  general  ors  for 
single-phase  and  for  polyphase  currents. 

Synchronous  motors,  induction  motors. 

Alternating  current  transformers — Motor- generators,  rotary  conver- 
ters, boosters. 

Storage  batteries — Switchboards,  regulating  apparatus,  and  safety 
devices. 

Distributing  systems  for  the  supply  of  light  and  power — Measurement 
of  power — Meters. 

Wires,  cables,  and  transmission  lines — Insulators  and  insulating 
materials . 

The  wiring  of  buildings  for  electric  light  and  power — Testing — The 
use  of"  ordinary  electric  measuring  instruments,  testing  of  magnetic  pro- 
perties of  iron,  location  of  faults  in  dynamos  and  cables,  mea-<uiement  of 
efficiency  of  dynamos  and  transformers. 

Arc  and  incandescent  lamps. 

Telephones  and  signalling  apparatus. 

General  arrangement  of  plant  for  electric  lighting,  and  for  power 
transmission — Operation  of  railways  and  tramways  by  electricity — 
Production  of  chemicals  by  electricity. 

The  Lectures  will  be  supplemented  by  Practical  work  in  the  Labo- 
ratory, and  Demonstrations  on  the  above. 

The  Laboratory  contains  a  Gas  Engine  of  8  b.h.  -p.,  with  a  belt-driven 
Dynamo,  Storage  Batteries,  a  pair  of  2  k.  w.  Dynamos,  coupled  on  same 
bed-plate,  a  5  h.-p.  Synchronous  Motor-Generator,  a  Rotary  Converter, 
Induction  Motors,  Transformers,  a  Potentiometer,  an  Oscillograph,  a 
Phase-shifting  Transformer,  and  an  outfit  of  modern  Electrical  Measur- 
ing Instruments. 

A  supply  of  three-phase  alternating  current  from  the  mains  of  the 
Dublin  Corporation  is  available  at  all  times. 


VIII. — MECHANicAii  Engineering.' 

The  Lectures  of  the  Lecturer  in  Mechanical  Engineering  include  the 
following: — 

Steam  Engines — Simple,  Compound,  and  Triple  Expansion.  Types 
of  valve  gears  and  governors.  Indicated  and  Brake  Horse-Power. 
Thermodynamic  and  Mechanical  efficiency.     Weight  and  Horse- Power 


a 


SCHOOL   OF  ENGINEERING.  293 

of  Engines.  Turbines.  Injectors.  Gas,  Oil,  and  Petrol  Engines — the 
two-stroke  and  four-stroke  cycles.  Different  types  of  valve  gears  and 
governors.     Gas  producers. 

The  theory  of  flexure  as  applied  to  the  determination  of  the  strength 
and  deflection  of  beams. 

Kineniatics  of  niacliines — Slider-crank  chains. 

Displacement,  velocity,  and  acceleration  diagrams. 

Toothed  gearing. 

The  strength  of  materials — various  tests  and  types  of  testing  machines. 
Alternating  stress.     Brinell  test. 

The  strength  of  columns.  Primary  and  secondary  flexure.  Collapsing 
pressure  of  circular  tubes. 

The  Mechanical  Engineering  Laboratory  is  under  the  super- 
intendence of  the  Lecturer  in  Mechanical  Engineering.  Its 
equipment  includes  a  10-ton  Wicksteed  Testing-machine,  a 
Locomotive  Boiler  and  Compound  Condensing  Engine  of  30  h.p., 
a  8  H.  p.  Crossley  Gas  Engine,  and  a  4  H.  p.  Tangye  Oil  Engine. 
The  Mechanical  Workshop  is  fitted  with  Lathes,  Shaping  and 
Drilling-machines,  and  other  Machine-tools  for  the  preparation  of 
specimens  for  testing  and  other  mechanical  work.  A  part  of  the 
Laboratory  is  fitted  up  for  the  testing  of  Cements :  its  equipment 
includes  a  tensile  Testing-machine  and  other  apparatus  used  in 
the  preparation  of  samples  for  testing. 

In  the  Michaelmas  and  Hilary  Terms  second  year  Students 
attend  a  Course  of  Demonstrations,  with  practical  work  in  the 
Laboratory,  on  the  following  subjects : — 

The  construction  and  working  of  steam,  gas,  and  oil  engines. 

Indicated  and  brake  horse-power. 

The  carrying  out  of  tests,  coal  and  water  consumption,  and  other 
measurements  necessary  for  determining  the  efficiency  of  the  steam 
engine. 

In  the  Hilary  and  Trinity  Terms  third  year  Students  attend 
a  Coiirfie  of  Demonstrations,  with  practical  work  in  the  Labora- 
tory, in  the  following  subjects : — 

The  preparation  of  specimens  for  testing. 

Tests  on  materials  for  tension,  shear,  torsion,  bending,  and  com- 
pression. 

Testa  on  columns,  and  the  method  of  plotting  the  experimiental 
results. 

Lathe  and  other  machine  tools. 

The  apparatus  required  for  the  testing  of  cements,  and  the  tests  used 
in  determining  the  value  of  a  cement. 


294  SCHOOL   OF    KNGINEKRING. 

ALEXANDKll  PRIZE. 

In  1922  the  pupils  and  friends  of  Thomas  Alexander,  for  thirty- 
four  years  Professor  of  Engineering,  provided  tlie  sum  of  £570 
to  found  a  Prize  in  appreciation  of  his  work  at  the  University. 

Ihe  Prize  (in  value  about  £25)  is  awarded  annually  to  the 
student  obtaining  tlie  highest  total  of  the  marks  allotted  to  Civil 
Engineering  at  the  regular  examination  for  the  Degree  of  B.A.I, 
held  in  Michaelmas  Term. 

The  Prize  may  be  divided,  in  case  of  equality  of  mei'it,  or  with- 
held if  merit  is  not  shown. 


MUSEUM  OF  NATURAL  PHILOSOPHT. 

Curator — William  Edward  Thkikt,  M.A.,  Professor  of 
Experimental  Philosophy. 

This  Museum  was  founded  about  the  year  1730,  when  Dr. 
Richard  Helsham  was  Professor  of  Natural  Philosophy.  It  contains 
a  collection  of  various  Philosophical  Instruments,  chieiiy  in  con- 
nexion with  the  sciences  of  Optics  and  Practical  Mechanics,  Theory 
of  Heat,  Electricity,  and  Magnetism.  Steps  have  lately  been 
taken  by  the  Board  of  Trinity  College  to  place  this  Museum  in  a 
condition  more  suited  to  the  purposes  of  modern  scientific  research, 
as  well  as  more  adapted  to  illustrate  the  Lectures  given  in  Natural 
and  Experimental  Philosophy.  The  Instruments  are  now  kept  in 
the  new  Physical  Laboratory,  the  gift  of  Viscount  Iveagh  to  the 
College,  along  with  the  instruments  purchased  out  of  the  funds 
supplied  by  him  for  its  equipment. 

MUSKUM    OF   GKOI.OGY   AND   MINKKALOGV. 

Curator— iovun  Jolt,  Sc.D.,  F.R.S.,  Professor  of  Geology  and 
Mineralogy. 
This  Museum  is  intended  principally  for  the  use  of  Students  in 
Engineering.  It  contains  typical  collections  of  Minerals  and 
Fossils,  arranged  for  the  use  of  Students,  and  also  some  rare 
specimens  of  Fossil  Reptiles  and  Deer. 

MUSEUM    OF   ENGINEEUING    MODELS. 

Curator— David  Cla«k,  B.Sc,  Professor  of  Engineering. 

This  Museum  was  founded  in  1 846.  It  contains  a  variety  of  En- 
gineering Models,  amongst  which  will  be  found  a  series  of  models 
illustrating  the  progress  of  invention  in  the  Steam  Engine  ;  a  model 
of  a  Locomotive  Engine  (scale  one -fourth)  ;  a  model  of  a  Cornish 
Pumping  Engine  (scale  one-twelfth);  a  large  collection  of  timber 
bridges ;  a  model  of  the  lifting  apparatus  of  the  Conway  Tube ;  a 
model  of  the  Boyne  Viaduct,  and  other  lattice  structures.  It  con- 
tains likewise  a  complete  collection  of  the  weights  and  measures 
of  the  Metric  System. 


SCHOOL  OP   ENGrNEERINO.  295 

St.  John's  Amhulance  Certii-icatk  for  puoficiency  in  First  Aids 

TO    THE    InJUKKI). 

Engineering  Students  may,  optionally,  take  out  a  short  course  of 
leetuies  in  the  elementary  principles  of  Physiology  and  Anatomy, 
followed  by  demonstrations  in  First  Aids  to  the  Injured.  The  Instruc- 
tion, which  will  begin  in  Michaelmas  Term,  will  be  such  as  to  qualify 
the  Student  to  present  himself  at  the  examination  for  the  St.  John's 
Ambulance  Certificate.  The  examination  may  be  arranged  for  any 
convenient  date,  and  for  any  number  of  candidates  up  to  thirty.  The 
cost  of  the  examination,  which  is  £4,  is  jointly  borne  by  the  candidates. 
There  are  no  fees  required  for  the  lectures  and  demonstrations. 

Particulars  as  regards  the  hours  and  dates  upon  which  the  lectures 
and  demonstrations  are  given  will  be  posted  in  the  Hall  of  the 
Engineering  School. 

Lending  Likkaky. 

In  the  Trinity  College  Lending  Library  there  are  copies  of  new  and 
important  books  on  Engineering. 

It  is  open  for  the  lending  and  return  of  books  on  three  days  of  each 
week  during  Term,  from  1.30  to  2.30  o'clock.  A  Catalogue  can  be 
obtained  for  one  shilling  on  application  to  the  Clerk  in  charge.  The 
Lending  Library  is  situated  in  the  Engineering  School  Building. 

Further  Information. 
Communications  from  persons  desirous  of  further  information  should 
be  addressed  to  the  Registrar,  Engineering  School,    Trinity  College, 
Dublin. 

Dublin  University  Engineering  Students'  Society. 
The  object  of  this  Society  is  to  afford  an  opportunity  for  the  discussioti 
of  subjects  of  interest  to  Engineers. 

Meetings  are  held  fortnightly  in  the  Engineering  School. 
The  Professor  of  Engineering  is  President  of  the  Society. 
Tne  Hon.  Secretary  will  be  happy  to  supply  any  further  information 
regarding  the  Society. 

Days  of  Examinatiok. 

MICHAELMAS   TERM,    1922. 

Examination  for  Degree  of  B.A.I.,         Begins  Tuesday,  Oct.  10. 
Supplemental  Examinations  of  Middle  )  g     -^  Tuesday,  Oct.  10. 

and  Junior  Glasses,  )       °  ■' 

Supplemental  Entrance  Examination,     Thursday,  October  12. 

TRINITY    TJ2RM,    1923. 

(  Begins  Wednesday,  April  25, 
Examination  for  Degree  of  B.A.I.,      <      and     Tuesday,    June     12 

(      (in  part). 
Examinations   of   Middle  and  Junior  )  Begin  Wednesday,  Apnl  25, 

Classes,  J      and    Friday,  June  22. 

Entrance  Examination,  Thursday,  June  28. 

MICHAELMAS  TERM,    1923. 

Examination  for  Degree  of  B.A.I.,  Begins  Wednesday,  Oct.  10. 

Supplemental  Examinations  of  Middle  |  j^     .^^  ^VTednesday,  Oct.  10. 

and  Junior  Classes,  )       °  •' 

Supplemental  Entrance,  Friday,  October  12. 


(     296     ) 


JitMatt  m\h  f  ome  CiMl  Serbia  S4oiJl» 


University  Lectures  in  Oriental  Languages  for  Selected 
Candidates  for  the  Civil  Service  of  India. 

On  the  13th  October,  1877,  a  communication  was  received  bv 
the  Provost  and  Senior  Fellows  from  the  Secretary  of  State  for 
India,  stating  that  Trinity  College  had  been  placed  on  the  list  of 
the  Institutions  in  which  Selected  Candidates  for  the  Civil  Service 
of  India  will  be  permitted  to  reside  during  their  period  of 
"Probation." 

Arrangements  have  been  made  enabling  selected  Candidates  for 
the  Civil  Service  of  India  to  complete  their  studies  in  Oriental 
Languages  with  the  aid  of  Special  Lectures  given  by  Professors  of 
the  University. 

Candidates  will  be  required  to  elect  at  the  beginning  of  the 
Term  the  Languages  in  which  they  wish  to  be  prepared. 

Three  Lectures  in  each  Language  will  be  given  weekly  during 
each  of  the  three  Terms  of  the  year,  except  in  Sanskrit  and 
Arabic,  in  each  of  which  five  Lectures  weekly  will  be  provided. 

Sophisters  having  credit  for  full  attendance  on  two  of  these 
special  courses  of  Lectures  can  claim  professional  privileges ;  see 
under  "  Professional  Privileges." 

Students  who  desir*  to  reside  in  Trinity  College,  Dublin,  during 
their  period  of  probation,  after  passing  the  Open  Competition  for 
the  Indian  Civil  Service,  will  be  allowed  to  put  their  names  on 
the  College  Books  without  Entrance  Fee ;  the  College  and  Uni- 
versity Fees  during  their  residence  will  therefore  be  £10  10s.  half- 
yearly.  Candidates  will  further  have  to  pay  a  fee  of  £2  2s.  per 
Term  for  the  Lectures  in  the  History  of  India.  They  will  be 
allowed  Residence  and  Commons  on  the  same  terms  as  other 
Students,  and  will  not  be  required  to  keep  Terms  in  Arts  while 
pursuing  their  special  studies. 

'ihe  total  cost  of  a  vear's  residence  should  not  exceed  £150. 


INDIAN  AND   HOME  CIVIL  SEAVICE  SCfiOOL.  297 

The  Lecturers  appointed  by  the  Board  of  Trinity  College  are  as 
follows: — 

Sanskrit, Prof.  Canning. 

Arabic,  Persian,  and  Hindustani,         .         .  Prof.    L.    While    King, 

LL.D. 

Tamil, Telugu,  Burmese,  Hindi,  Bengali,  and 

Marathi,        ......  Prof.  John  van  Someren 

Pope,  M.A. 

History  of  India, Prof.    L.   White    King, 

LL.D. 

Indian  Law, Mr.   T.   C.    K.    Moore, 

JB.A. 


The  Board  offer  annual  Prizes  of  £10  in  Sanskrit,  £10  in  Arabic, 
£5  in  Hindustani,  and  £5  in  Persian. 

It  may  be  added  that  the  Law  Courts,  Police  Courts,  &c.,  in 
Dublin,  afford  ample  opportunities  for  Candidates  to  observe  the 
practice  of  the  Law  in  its  various  branches. 

Candidates  intending  to  reside  in  Trinity  College  are  requested 
to  communicate  with  E.  H.  Alton,  M.A.,  F.T.C.D.,  40,  Trinity 
College,  Dublin,  who  will  give  any  further  information  which  may 
be  required. 


Classes  for  the  Indian,  Colonial,  and  Home  Civil  Service 
(Glass  I.)- 

1.  These  Classes  are  open  to  all  Candidates  for  the  Examination 
for  the  Indian,  Colonial,  and  Home  Civil  Service  (Class  I.), 
whether  those  Candidates  belong  to  Trinity  College  or  not. 

2  The  Course  of  Study  will  be  divided,  during  the  current 
Academic  year,  1922-1923,  into  two  Sessions  (a  Winter  Session 
from  October  25  to  March  17,  and  a  Summer  Session,  from 
April  16  to  June  23) ;  in  each  of  which  Sessions  not  less  than 
two  hours  of  teaching  per  week  will  be  given  in  each  Class  except 
during  the  Christmas  Vacation  (December  21  to  January  13). 
This  teaching  will  comprise  not  only  specific  instructions  directed 
entirely  to  the  requirements  of  the  Examination,  but  also  guidance 
to  the  several  Candidates  as  to  the  course  of  private  reading  which 
will  best  suit  the  needs  of  each. 

o  :J  / 


298  INDtAK  AND    HOME  CtVIL   SKtlVICE  SCHOOt. 

3.  It  is  proposed  to  offer  during  the  Academic  year  1922-1923 
instructiou  in  most  subjects  for  the  Open  Examination. 

For  fuitlier  particulars  regarding  Lectures  apply  to  E.  H. 
Alton,  M.A.,  F.T.C.D.,  40,  Trinity  College. 

4.  At  the  end  of  the  Winter  Session  a  General  Examination  will 
be  held  in  all  the  subjects  in  which  instruction  has  been  given; 
and  Prizes  will  be  awarded  by  the  Board,  varying  from  £1  Is. 
to  £4  4s.,  to  every  Candidate  who  is  considered  to  have  shown 
merit  of  a  high  order. 

0.  A  Student  who  belongs  to  Trinity  College  shall  pay  either 
(1)  Five  Guineas  Entrance  Fee  to  the  Classes  and  a  Special  Fee  of 
2j  guineas  for  each  Class  which  lie  attends  during  the  "Winter 
Session,  and  1|  guinea  for  each  Class  he  attends  during  the 
Summer  Session ;  or  (2)  he  may  pay  no  Entrance  Fee,  but  in  that 
case  he  shall  pay  a  Special  Fee  of  3|  guineas  for  each  Class  which 
he  attends  during  the  Winter  Session,  and  2^  guineas  for  each 
Class  which  he  attends  during  tbe  Summer  Session. 

A  Student  who  does  not  belong  to  Trinity  College  shall  pay 
either  (1)  Five  Guineas  Entrance  Fee  to  the  Classes,  and  a  Special 
Fee  of  '6\  and  2|  guineas  for  each  Class  which  he  attends  in  the 
Winter  and  Summer  Sessions  respectively  ;  or  (2)  he  may  pay  no 
Entrance  Fee,  but  in  that  case  he  shall  pay  a  Special  Fee  of  4| 
guineas  and  31  guineas  for  each  Class  which  he  attends  in  the 
Winter  and  Summer  Sessions  respectively. 

Students  who  have  once  paid  the  Entrance  Fee  will  not  be 
required  to  pay  it  again  for  any  subsequent  year  in  which  the 
Classes  are  continued. 

All  Fees  must  be  paid  to  the  Registrar  of  the  School  previous 
to  attendance  at  any  Class.  Paymeiils  should  be  made  by  crossed 
cheque  or  money  order  payable  to  the  Junior  Bursar,  Trinity 
College,  Dublin. 

Students  wishing  to  join  these  Classes  are  requested  to  com- 
municate with  the  Registrar  of  the  Indian  and  Home  Civil  Service 
School,  E.  H.  Alton,  M.A.,  K.T.C.D.,  4(t,  Trinity  College,  Dublin, 
who  will  supply  any  further  information  which  may  be  required. 


(     299    ) 

^rjraol  of  Ji^iiinrultim. 

Entrance  to  the  School  of  Agriculture  is  open  without  Exami- 
nation to  students  whose  names  are  on  the  College  Hooks.  For 
others,  Entrance  is  by  Examination  in  general  education  ;  to  be 
held  in  October. »  the  Course  for  this  examination  will  be 
English  Composition,  English  Historj',  Geograph}-,  Arithmetic, 
Klementary  Algebra  and  Geometry,  and  one  of  the  following : — 
Greek,  Latin,  French,  Geiman.  The  examination  may  be 
remitted  in  the  case  of  students  having  credit  for  an  equivalent 
educational  test  at  any  well-recognized  institution.  Entrance 
fee  for  external  students,  one  guinea. 

EDGK    EXHIBITIONS. 

Edge  Exhibitions,  one  of  tlie  value  of  £4,  and  another  of  the 
value  of  £2,  are  awarded  by  the  iioard  at  the  end  of  the  studies 
of  the  first  year  on  a  report  from  the  Kegistrar  of  the  School  of 
Agriculture. 

At  the  Final  Examination,  Edge  Exhibitions,  one  of  the  value 
of  £10,  and  another  of  the  value  of  £4,  are  awarded  on  the 
general  results  of  that  examination. 

The  Exhibitions  are  limited  to  students  on  the  College  Books, 
3r  Graduates  of  Trinity  College,  Dublin. 

{The  Board  and  Council  have  approved  of  the  following  scheme  of  co- 
operation with  the  Department  of  Agriculture  and  with  the  Royal 
College  of  Science  for  Ireland)  :  — 

First  'I'wo  Yeaks  (taken  at  Trinity  College). 
First  Year,  Second  Tear. 

Mathematics.  Anulytical  Chemistry  and  Practical 

Phj'sics  (f-eneral).  Organic  Chemistry. 

Practical  Meteorology.  Mechanics  and  Mathematics. 

Cliemistry  (general  principles).     Zoology. 
Drawing.  Botany. 

Arts.  Geology. 

Arts 
Second  Two  Years  (taken  at  the  Royal  College  of  Science). 
Third  Year.  Fourth  Year. 

Agriculture.  Agriculture. 

Agricultural  Chemistry.  Agricultural  Zoology. 

Agricultural  Geology.  Agricultural  Botany. 

Agricultural  Engineering.  Agricultural  Bacteriology. 

Arts  (at  Trinity  College),  with     Veterinary  Hygiene, 
professional  privileges.  Arts  (at  Trinity  College),  with 

professional  privileges. 

*  Candidates  miist  send  notice  (addressed  to  the  ReRistrar  ot  School  of  Agriculture, 
Tnnlty  College,  Dublin)  of  their  intention  to  enter,  before  the  Ist  October. 


300  SCHOOL   OP  AGEICTJITTJKE. 

According  to  tliis  scheme  (which  is  on  the  lines  of  that  framed 
by  the  Department)  the  student  spends  his  first  two  j-ears  in  the 
School  in  studj^ng  the  general  principles  of  the  sciences  which 
later  find  practical  application  in  the  scientific  study  of  agri- 
culture. He  keeps  the  usual  Freshman  terms  in  Arts,  and,  if 
desirous  of  proceeding  to  the  Degree  in  Agriculture,  he  also  keeps 
the  Sophister  terms  in  Arts.  During  the  Sophister  years  he 
receives  "professional  privileges"  in  Arts. 

At  the  conclusion  of  the  first  two  years  the  student  is  examined 
in  the  Science  Courses  pursued  by  him.  This  examination  is  con- 
ducted in  Trinity  College  and  by  the  Examiners  of  the  University. 

During  the  second  two  years  the  student  studies  Agriculture 
and  Agricultural  Science  in  the  Itoyal  College  of  Science  and  at 
the  Farm  at  Glasnevin.  During  one  of  these  years  the  student 
carries  out  research  in  Agricultural  Science  under  the  direction 
of  one  of  the  Professors  or  Lecturers  of  the  lloyal  College  of 
Science.  Students  who  aim  at  obtaining  a  Diploma  in  the 
University  of  Dublin,  and  do  not  seek  the  Degree  (Agr.  B.)  need 
attend  no  Arts  lectures  in  Trinity  College  after  passing  the  Final 
Freshman  Examination.  They  would,  after  their  first  two  years, 
take  a  less  specialized  course  than  that  required  for  the  Associate- 
ship  of  the  iioyal  College  of  Science. 

The  final  examination  in  Agriculture  and  Agricultural  Science 
is  conducted  in  the  Koyal  College  of  Science,  and  mainly  by  the 
Professors  of  that  College ;  but  the  University  of  Dublin  is 
represented  at  that  examination  by  an  examiner  appointed  by 
Trinity  College,  and  extern  to  the  Koyal  College  of  Science. 

The  following  particulars  apply  to  the  Courses  pursued  during 
the  first  two  years  in  Trinity  College.  For  the  Courses  pursued 
during  the  second  two  years  the  student  must  make  application 
to  the  Koyal  College  of  Science  for  Ireland. 

First  Year. 

Mathematics,  including  Mensuration — 

Three  lectures  per  week  during  Michaelmas  Term. 

Fee  for  course  for  External  Students,"  three  guineas  ;  for  Arts 
Students,  two  guineas. 

Fnysics  (general) — 

Simple  Measurements,   Elementary  Hydrostilics,   Pneumatics, 
Heat,  etc.,  delivered   by  the  Professor  during   Michaelmas  and 
Hilary  Terms. 
Fee  for  External  Students,  two  guineas ;  free  to  Arts  Studenis. 
Practical  Meteorology. — During  Trinity  Term. 

External  Students  pay  two  guineas ;  Arts  Students,  one  guinea. 

'External  Students  are  Students,  other  than  Graduates,  whose  names  are  not  on  the 
College  Books. 


SCHOOL  OF  AGKICtrLTXTRE.  301 

Chemistry — 

ia)  The  course  of  lectures  on  General  Chemistry,  three  times  per 
week  during  Michaelmas  and  Hilary  Terms. 

{b)  Practical  Cliemistry,  three  afternoons  in  the  week  during 
Michaelmas  and  Hilary  Lecture  Terms,  and  as  far  as  practicahle, 
during  the  interval  between  these  terms,  on  three  days  in  the  week. 

(c)  Practical  Chemistry  during  Trinity  Term  according  to  time 
available. 

Fee  for  course — External  Students,  six  guineas  ;  Arts  Students, 
five  guineas. 

Drawing  (Geometrical). — During  Trinity  Term. 

Fee  for  External  Students,  three  guineas ;  for  Arts  Students, 
two  guineas. 

[Total  fees — External  Students,  sixteen  guineas  ;  Arts  Students,  ten 
guineas. 1 

Second  Year. 

Chemistry — 

[a)  Twelve  or  more  lectures  and  demonstrations  on  Analytical 
Chemistry,  [b]  Practical  work  in  the  laboratory  (quantitative 
analysis)  three  days  a  week  during  two  terms,  and,  if  practicable, 
during  the  third  term. 

Fee  for  course — External  Students,  six  guineas ;  Arts  Students, 
five  guineas. 

Mechanics  and  Applied  Mathematics — 

Three  lectures  per  week  in  Michaelmas  Term. 
Fee  for  External  Students,  three  guineas ;   Arts  Students,  two 
guineas. 

Zoology — 

Three  terms  as  given  to  Junior  Sophisters. 

Fee  for  course — External  Students,  four  guineas ;  Arts  Students, 
three  guineas. 

Botany — 

The  lectures  and  demonstrations  of  the  Professor,  extending  over 
ten  weeks  during  Trinity  Term. 

Fee  for  External  Students,  three  guineas  ;  for  Arts  Students,  two 
guineas. 

Geology — 

The  Professor's  lectures  and  demonstrations  over  Michaelmas  and 
Hilary  Terms. 

Fee  for  External  Students,  three  guineas ;  for  Arts  Students,  two 
guineas. 

[Total  fees — Externals,  nineteen  guineas ;  Arts,  fourteen  guineas.] 

The  fee  for  the  Degree  in  Agriculture  (Agr.  B.)  is  £5. 

/ 


(     302     ) 


^t^aol  of  J'^mtrn. 

Thk  Coiirses  in  Forestry  of  the  Royal  College  of  Science  are 
open  to  Students  of  Trinity  College  in  the  School  of  Agriculture, 
replacing  the  agricultural  work  of  the  second  two  years  of  the 
School  of  Agriculture. 

The  Courses  in  Forestry  would  betaken  at  the  Royal  College 
of  Science,  and  would  be  as  follows:  — 

3kd  Yeae. 

(«)  October  to  June — 3  Terms. 
Forestry. 

Forest  JEngineering  and  Surveying. 
Forest  Zoology. 
Forest  Botany,  including  Structure  of  Timber  and  Diseases  of 

Trees. 
Soil  Geology. 
Elementary  Agriculture. 
Arts  (at  Trinity  College),  with  professional  privileges. 

{b)  July  to  September. 

Outdoor  work  for  tliree  months  at  Avondale,  or  in  an  approved 
Irish  or  British  Forest. 

4th  Year. 

(«)  October  to  March — 2  Terms. 
Forestry. 
Forest  Botany,  including  Structure  of  Timber  and  Diseases  of 

Trees. 
Forest  Zoology. 
Forest  Chemistry. 
Practical  Work  on  Excursions. 
Arts  (at  Trinity  College),  with  professional  privileges. 

(b)  Third  Term — April  to  June. 

Outdoor  work  for  three  months  in  an  approved  Continental 
Forest. 

These  Courses,  along  with  the  first  two  years'  curriculum  of 
the  School  of  Agriculture,  as  at  present  arranged,  would  entitle 
the  Studen*  to  the  Diploma  in  Agriculture  (Forestry)  of  the 
University ;  or,  provided  the  H.A.  has  been  obtained,  to  the 
Degree  in  Agriculture  (Forestry),  Agr.  (Forest.)  B.  The  fee  for 
the  Degree  is  £5. 


(     303     ) 


^■taminntioits  far  (tnalificatiou.^  iu  (^Mttntion. 

Three  Qualifications  are  granted — viz.  the  Diploma  inEleraen- 
tar}'  Education,  the  Higher  Diploma  in  Education,  and  the 
Higher  Diploma  with  Distinction. 

Candidates  must  produce  to  the  Registrar  of  the  Scliool  of 
Education  satisfactory  evidence  («)  that  they  are  of  good 
character ;  [b)  that  they  have  had  sufficient  experience  of  teaching 
(whicli  must  extend  over  a  year  at  least),  or  have  undergone  a 
year's  training  at  a  recognized  Training  College;  and  (c)  that 
their  scholastic  attainments  are  adequate. 

Tiie  usual  recjuirement  for  admission  to  the  Examination  for  the 
Higher  Diploma  in  Education  is  that  the  candidate  shall  liave 
graduated  in  some  University  under  the  Britisli  Crown.  For  tlie 
Diploma  in  Elementary  Education,  so  far  as  Primary  Teachers 
are  concerned,  see  page  78. 

For  the  year  1923  all  candidates  for  Qualifications  in  Education 
are  expected  to  studj' — 

Dumville,     The    Fundamentals    of   Psychology    (University 

Tutorial  Series,  "W.  B.  Olive). 
Welton,  Logical  Bases  of  Education  (Macmillan). 
Bagley,  The  Educative  Process  (Macmillan). 
Culverwell,  Montessori  Principles  and  Practice. 
Monroe,  Text  Book  in  the  History  of  Education  (Macmillan), 

from  the  close  of  the  Middle  Ages  to  the  present  time. 

They  are  also  required  to  show  a  general  knowledge  of  tlie  Hygienic 
Principles  bearing  on  Schools  and  School- work. 

Candidates   for    the  Diploma   in   Elementary  Education  are 

expected  to  study,  in  addition  to  the  above,  Salmon's  Art  of 

Teaching,  or  Laudon's  Principles  and  Practice  of  Teaching  and 
Class  Management. 

Candidates  for  the  Higher  Diploma  in  Education  are  expected 
to  study  a  more  extensive  Course,  to  be  arranged  or  approved  by 
the  Examiners,  including  other  works  set  for  the  Arts  Course  in 
Education. 

The  Higher  Diploma  with  Distinction  is  granted  on  tlie  result 
of  a  second  and  stricter  examination.  Those  only  will  be  admitted 
who  have  attained  a  high  standard  at  a  previous  Higher  Diploma 
Examination. 


304  QUALIFlCATlOlfS  IN   EDtJCATlON. 

Essays  by  candidates  will  be  required  in  additiou  to  Examiua- 
tion  in  the  Hall. 

The  fee  payable  for  Examination  for  the  Diploma  in  Elemen- 
tary Education  for  candidates  other  than  King's  Scholars  is 
£2  2s.  for  Graduates  of  the  University  of  Dublin,  and  £3  ."is.  for 
non -Graduates. 

The  fee  payable  for  the  Higher  Diploma  Examination  is  £2  2s. 
for  Graduates  of  the  University  of  Dublin,  and  £4  4s.  for  other 
candidates.  The  fee  for  the  additional  Examination  for  the 
Higher  Diploma  with  Distinction  is  £1  Is.  for  Graduates  of  the 
University  of  Dublin,  and  £2  2s.  for  other  candidates. 

Candidates  must  send  their  fees  to  the  Registrar  of  the  School 
of  Education  a  fortnight  before  the  date  of  the  Examination. 

In  1923,  the  Examination  for  the  Higher  Diploma  and  the 
Higher  Diploma  with  Distinction  will  begin  on  Friday  and 
Saturday,  April  20,  2 1  ;  and  on  Friday  and  Saturday,  October  26, 
27. 

All  further  information  will  be  supplied  on  application  to  tlie 
Registrar  of  the  School  of  Education. 


S40OI  of  (^ommtxa. 

Arrangements  are  being  made  for  a  School  of  Commerce. 


Ji^bma  in  feottomirs  mxb  (Sjommtxtmi  gitotokbg^. 

1.  This  Diploma  will  be  granted  for  proficiency  in  the  various 
branches  of  a  higher  business  education,  as  tested  by  an  Exami- 
nation. 

2.  The  Examination  will  be  open  to  anyone  who  can  produce 
evidence  (a)  that  he  is  of  good  character ;  (6)  that  he  has  a  satis- 
factory Preliminary  Education:  e.  y.,  that  he  has  matriculated 
in  any  University  or  University  College ;  has  passed  the  Middle 
or  Senior  Grade  Intermediate  Examination  ;  has  the  certificate 
of  any  recognized  Technical  School  or  School  of  Commerce ;  or 
possesses  any  other  qualification  deemed  sufficient  by  the  Board. 

3.  The  Examination  will  be  held  annually  on  days  named  in 
the  University  Almanac.     In  1923  it  will  be  held  on  April  10 


DIPLOMA    IN   ECONOMICS   AND   COMMERCIAL   KNOWLEDGE.     305 

and  following  days.  It  shall  be  in  the  power  of  the  Examiners, 
if  it  is  thought  advisable,  to  hold  parts  of  the  Examination  at 
night,  a  week's  notice  at  least  being  given  to  the  candidates. 

4.  Candidates  will  be  required  to  give  at  least  one.  month's 
notice  of  their  intention  to  compete  for  any  portion  of  the  obli- 
gatory subjects  of  the  Examination:  and  at  least  three  mouths' 
notice  of  the  special  optional  course  or  courses  which  they  intend 
to  offer. 

5.  The  Course  for  the  Examination  will  be  as  follows: — 


Obligatory  Subjects. 
I. — Economics,  Descriptive  and  Theoretical. 

Candidates  will  be  required  to  have  a  general  knowledge  ot  the 
scope  and  method  of  economics,  and  the  princi[)les  of  production, 
exchange,  and  distribution.  Also  an  acquaintance  with  the  chief 
forms  of  industrial  organization,  especially  those  existing  in  the 
United  Kingdom. 

[Nicholson,  Elements  of  Political  Economy,  or  Devas,  Political 
Economy,  may  be  used  as  a  convenient  text-book.  Marshall, 
Elements  of  Economics ;  Hadley,  Economics ;  and  Pierson, 
Principles  of  Economics,  Vol.  I.,  will  be  found  useful  for 
additional  readine.] 

II. — Economic  and  Commercial  History. 

The  outlines  of  the  industrial  and  commercial  development  of 
Great  Britain,  Ireland,  and  the  Colonies  during  the  eighteenth 
and  nineteenth  centuries.  Particular  attention  should  be  paid 
to  the  growth  of  the  great  industries  and  the  progress  of  trade. 

[T.  Warner,  Landmarks  of  English  Industrial  History,  may  be  used 
as  !in  introduction.  For  Irish  History,  Murray,  Commercial 
Relations  between  England  and  Ireland.  For  reference,  Mere- 
dith, Economic  History  of  England,  and  Cunningham,  Growth  of 
English  Industry  and  Commerce,  Vol.  II.] 

III. — Commercial  Geography. 

(«)  General  physiographical  conditions. 
{b)  The  chief  economic  products. 

(c)  The  economic  conditions  and  resources  of  the  chief  countries 
of  the  world. 

(rf)  Trade  routes. 

[Chisholm,  Smaller  Commercial  Geography,  or  Adams,  Commercial 
Geography.  For  additional  reading  Cldsbolm,  Handbook  of 
Commercial  Geography,  is  recommended.] 


306      DIPLOMA   IN   ECONOMICS  AND   COMMERCIAL   KNOWLEDGE. 

IV. — Accountancy  and  Business  Methods. 

(a)  The  principal  forms   of  accounts.     The   preparation   of  a 
Balance  sheet.     Cost-taking.     Depreciation  and  the  formation  of 
reserves. 
(A)  Organization  of  business  departments.     Office  work. 
[Cropper,  Book-keepina;  and  Accounts. 
Lisle,  Accoiintinii;  in  Theory  and  Practice. 
Dicksee,  OflSce  Organization.] 

V. — Commercial  and  Industrial  Laic. 

(rt)  The  law  of  contract.     The  principal  trade  contracts.     Com- 
pany law.     Negotiable  instruments. 

(6)  The  factory  code.    Workmen's  compensation.     Employers' 
liability. 

[Steven,  Mercantile  Law. 
Redgrave,  The  Factory  Acts. 

For    further    reading,    Tophani,    Company    Law,     and    Anson, 
'  Contracts '  are  recommended.] 

Optional  Scbjkcts. 

[Of  which  one  under  each  head  may  be  taken.] 

VI. —  A  Modern   Language. 

(1)  French.  , 

(2)  German. 
(3    Spanish. 

Candidates  will  be  tested  in  translation  from  and  into  English, 
dictation,  and  conversation. 

VII. — Special  Economic  Subjects. 
Candidates  who  take  one  of  the  Optional  Economic  subjects  will 
be  expected  to  possess  a  fuller  knowledge  of  the  theory  and  of  the 
facts  relating  to  the  subject  that  they  select.  Particular  attention 
should  be  given  to  the  modern  developments  in  theory  and  to 
the  existing  conditions. 

(1) — Money  and  Monetary  Systems. 

Definition  and  historical  development  of  money .    The  conditions 
that   determine   the  value   of  money.     The  different  monetary 
systems.      The    history   of    the   English    currency.      Monetary 
changes  in  the  nineteenth  century.     Controversies  respecting  the 
standard  of  value.     The  actual  monetary  systems  of  the  world. 
[Jevons,  Money,  and  Nicholson,  Money  and  Monetary  I'roblems, 
are  recommended. 
F.  A.   Walker,  Money,  Withers,  The  Meaning  of  Money,  and 
Conant,  The  Principles  of  Money  and  Banking,  may  be  used  for 
further  reading.] 


DIPLOMA    IN   ECONOMICS   AND   COMMKKCIAL   KNOWLKDGE.     307 

(2) — Foreign  Trade. 

The  nature  of  foreign  trade  and  the  conditions  on  whicli  its 
development  depends.  Values  in  foreign  trade.  The  use  of 
money  in  foreign  trade.  The  foreign  exchanges.  Imports  and 
exports.  The  regulation  offoreign  trade  and  its  eflfects.  Customs 
duties. 

[Fisk,  International  Commercial  Policies. 
Giffen,  The  Use  of  Import  and  Export  Statistics. 
Clare,  Tlie  A  B  C  of  the  Foreign  Exchanges.] 

(3) — Taxation. 

The  development  of  taxation.  The  different  kinds  of  taxes. 
The  principal  rules  of  taxation.  Direct  and  indirect  taxation. 
General  and  local  taxation.    The  incidence  and  effects  of  taxation. 

[Plehii,  Public  Finance,  Part  II.,  or  G.  Arniitage  Smith,  Taxation, 

is  recommended  as  an  inlrodiictorj-  book. 
Bhjnden,  Local  Taxation,  and  J.  S.  Mill,  Principles  of  Political 

Economy,  Book  Y.,  chaps.  2-6,  maybe  used  for  further  reading.] 

(4) — Associations  and  Combinations  in  Trade  and  Industry. 

(rt)  The  growth  of  association  in  the  modern  economic  system. 
Trusts  and  Ivartells.  Combination  and  monopoly.  The  control  of 
combinations  by  the  State. 

[b)  The  rise  and  growth  of  Trade  Unionism,  Effects  of  work- 
men's combinations.     Modern  Trade  Union  problems. 

[Jenks,  The  Trust  Problem,  and  Howell,  Trades  Unionism    Old 

and  NeM',  are  recommended. 
J.  B.  Clark,  The  Control  of  Trusts. 
M'Crosty,  The  Trust  Movement  in  British  Industry. 
S.  and  B.  Webb,  The  History  of  Trade  Unionisjii,  may  be  I'sed  for 

additional  reading.] 

(5) — Statistics  and  Statisticul  Methods. 

Nature  and  scope  of  statistics.  Use  of  averages.  Tabulation. 
Sampling.  Elementary  graphic  methods.  The  use  of  index- 
numbers.  Tests  of  accuracy.  The  statistics  of  population,  trade, 
prices,  wages,  and  employment. 

[Bowley,  An  Elementary  Manual  of  Statistics,  is  recommended  as  a 
convenient  introductory  book.  For  further  reading,  Mayo-Smith, 
Statistics  and  Economics,  may  be  used.] 

VIII. — Special  Subjects  in  Economic  and  Business  Organization. 

Candidates  who  take  one  of  the  Optional  Business  subjects  will  be 
expected  to  have  au  adequate  knowledge  of  the  development  of 


308     DIPLOMA    IN   ECONOMICS   AND   COMMERCIAL   KNOWLEDOE. 

the  class  of  business  and  of  its  organization.  The  methods 
pursued,  and  the  economic  principles  underlying  them,  should 
also  be  studied. 

(1) — Banking  and  Credit  Institutions. 

The  functions  of  banks.  Credit  as  an  economic  agent.  The 
growth  of  banking  in  Great  Britain  and  Ireland.  Banking  legis- 
lation. The  Bank  Charter  Act,  1844.  Modern  banking  problems. 
Banking  in  other  countries. 

[Dunbar,  Theory  and  History  of  Banking,  is  recommended  as  an 

introductory  text-book. 
Clare,  Money  Market  Primer. 
Bagehot,  Lombard  Stieet ; 

and 
Rae,  The  Country  Banker,  will  supply  a  general  account  of  British 

banking. 
For  the  law  of  bills,  cheques,  and  promissory  notes,  Clialniers, 

Bills  of  Exchange  Act,  1882,  should  be  read. 
For  reference.    Hart,    Treatise   on    tlie    Law    of    Banking ;    or 

Chalmers,  Digest  of  the  Law  of  Bills  of  Exchange,  &c.] 

(2) — Railways  and  Transport  Ayencies, 

The  rise  of  the  modern  transport  system.  The  railways  of 
Great  Britain  and  Ireland.  Principles  of  railway  rates.  Legis- 
lation respecting  railways.  Competition  and  combination  in 
transport.     The  general  features  of  foreign  railway  systems. 

[Acworth,  Railway  Economics,  and  Hadley,  llailroad  Transporta- 
tion, are  recommended. 
Findlay,  Working  and  Management  of  an  English  Railway,  and 
Grierson,  Railway  Rates,  may  be  consulted.] 

(3) — Insurance. 

The  general  character  of  insurance.  The  different  kinds  ol 
insurance.  The  theory  of  insuring  risks.  Growth  of  insurance 
business.     Insurance  Law. 

[T.  E.  Young,  Insurance. 

F.  Harcourt  Kitchin,  The  Principles  and  Finance  of  Fire  Insur- 
ance. 
W.  Schooling,  Life  Insurance  Explained. 
W.  Gow,  Marine  Insurance. 
C.  F.  Morrell,  Insurance  :  a  Manual  of  Practical  Law.] 

(4) — Agriculture. 

The  different  systems  of  farming.  Small  and  large  farms. 
Land -rent  and  its  variations. 


DIPLOMA   IN   ECONOMICS   AND   COMMKHCIAL   KNOWLEDGE,      309 

Combination  in  agriculture.  Farmers'  associations.  Agricul- 
tural credit.  Insurance.  The  effect  of  markets  on  agriculture. 
Transport  charges.  Fluctuations  in  prices.  Model  farms.  The 
State  and  agriculture.     Effects  of  taxation. 

[Taylor,  Agricultiiriil  Economics;  Rogers,  Tlie  Business  Side  of 
Agiiculture ;  Pratt,  Organization  of  Agriculture,  and  The 
Report  of  the  Recess  Committee,  are  recommended. "1 

6.  Candidates,  in  order  to  obtain  any  credit  for  the  Examination, 
must  pass  in  three  subjects,  of  which  Economics,  theoretical  and 
descriptive,  must  be  one. 

Candidates  who  satisfy  this  condition  may  pass  in  the  remaining 
subjects  at  a  subsequent  Examination. 

The  Diploma  will  not  be  issued  until  the  candidate  has  passed 
in  all  the  obligatory  subjects. 

7.  The  Diploma  will  be  given  for  proficiency  in  the  Obligatory 
portion  of  the  Examination.  The  Optional  Courses,  in  which 
the  candidate  passes,  will  be  further  specified  on  the  Di[»loma. 
Exceptional  excellence  in  any  subject  will  also  be  indicated. 

8.  Members  of  Trinity  College  will  be  allowed  to  present  them- 
selves for  the  Examination  each  year  on  payment  of  a  fee  of 
One  Guinea.  Candidates  who  are  not  members  of  Trinity  College 
shall  pay  a  fee  of  Two  Guineas  each  year.  The  fees  sliould  be 
paid  to  the  Junior  Bursar  not  later  than  three  days  before  the 
commencement  of  the  Examination 

9.  The  obtaining  of  this  Diploma  will  be  accepted  as  equivalent 
for  the  exercises  required  for  keeping  the  Hilary  and  Trinity 
Term«  of  the  Senior  Sophister  year,  but  not  for  the  B.A.  Degree 
Examination. 

10.  Candidates  who  propose  to  present  themselves  for  tlie 
Exr.mination  for  this  Diploma  should  communicate  with  Professor 
C.  F.  Uastablk,  Trinity  College,  Dublin,  who  will  give  any 
further  information  which  may  be  required. 


(     310     ) 


Jijfloma  iox  Wiomtw  tit  |}eItgiouj>  ^uohrk^o^. 

1.  The  Examination  shall  be  under  the  dii'ection  of  the  Regius 
Professor  of  Divinity,  and  sliall  be  open  to  all  women,  wlietlier 
members  of  the  University  or  not. 

2.  It  shall  consist  of  three  divisions,  one  or  more  of  which  may 
be  taken  at  any  time,  and  in  any  order. 

3.  It  shall  begin  usually  on  tlie  Wednesday  next  after 
October  9tli,  January  9th,  and  April  14th  ;  and  candidates  shall 
send  their  names  to  the  Lady  Registrar,  5,  Trinit}'  College,  not 
less  than  one  month  before  the  date  of  the  Examination,  stating 
for  which  division  or  divisions  they  intend  to  offer  themselves. 
In  the  years  1922,  1923  the  Kxaminalion  will  begin  on  October  1 1, 
1922,  and  January  10,  April  18,  October  10,  1923. 

4.  If  a  candidate  fails  in  one  paper,  she  may  add  that  paper  to 
the  next  division  for  which  she  enters  ;  but  if  slie  fails  in  any 
paper  in  the  last  of  her  three  divisions,  she  must  take  the  whole 
of  that  division  again. 

5.  The  fee  payable  for  each  division  shall  be  £1  Is.  for  women 
who  have  matriculated  in  tlie  University,  and  £2  2s.  for  those 
who  have  not.  This  must  be  paid  to  the  Junior  Bursar  at  the  same 
lime  that  application  is  made  for  admission  to  the  Examination. 

6.  Successful  candidates  will  receive  a  Diploma  iu  the  following 
form : — 

Oiimes  quibus  haec  charta  perveniat  certiores  facinius  A.  B.  in 
sacris  litteris  sedido  operam  navasse  tribiis  examinationibiis  rite 
peractis. 

Praepositus. 

Sacrae  Theol.  Regius 

Professor. 


7.  The  subjects  for  examination  shall  be  as  follows : — 

Division  I. 

Papek  1.  The  liistory  and  religious  thought  of  Israel  to  the  accession  of 
Uzziah. 

2.  The  four  Gospels  in  English. 

3.  The  history  and  the  contents  of  the  Apostles'  and  the  Nicene 

Creeds. 


DIPLOMA    FOK   WOMEN   IN   KELIOIODS   KNOWI.EDGK.  311 


Division  II. 

4.  The  history  and  religious  thought  of  Israel  from  the  accession 

of  Uzziah  to  the  close  of  the  Old  Testament. 

5.  The  Acts  and  Epistles  in  English,  including  the  occasion  and 

destination  of  the  several  Epistles. 

6.  (a)  The  history  of  the  Celtic  Church  and  of  the  Anglo-Norman 

Church  in  Ireland,  {b)  The  history  of  tlie  Church  in  Kngland 
from  the  accession  of  Edward  III  to  the  accession  of  Queen 
Anne. 

Division  III. 

7.  The  history  and  contents  of  the  Book  of  Common  Prayer,  with 

special  reference  to  Baptism  and  the  Holy  Communion. 

8.  The   history  of    the    Christiiin    Church    (excluding    tlie   New 

Testament)  to  the  Council  of  Clialcedon. 

9.  One  of  the  following  ;  — 

The  Book  of  Genesis  in  Hebrew. 
Tlie  Epistle  to  the  Romans  in  Greek. 
The  comparative  study  of  religion*. 

*,*  All  questions  in  Divisions  I  and  II  on  the  text  of  the  Old  and 
New  Testaments  will  have  reference  to  the  Revised  Version. 

Candidates  will  not  be  examined  in  particular  books,  but  the 
following,  among  others,  will  be  found  useful  for  study  : — 

Paveks  1  AND  4.  Wade,  Old  Testament  Eistory,  London,  1901 ;  Foakes 
Jackson,  The  Biblical  History  of  the  Hebretcs,  Cambridge, 
1909  ;  Chapman,  An  Introduction  to  the  l^ntateuch,  Cam- 
bridge, 1911  ;  W.  R.  Smith,  The  Prophets  of  Israel,  London, 
1895;  The  Old  Testament  in  the  Jewish  Church,'  London, 
1892  ;  G.  A.  Smith,  The  Book  of  Isaiah,  London,  1889  ;  The 
Book  of  the  Twelve  Prophets,  London,  1896;  Kautzsch, 
Article  Religion  of  Inrael,  in  Hastings'  Dictionary  of  the 
Bible,  extra  vol. 

'2.  Sanday,  article  Jesus  Christ,  in  Hastings'  D.  B.,  vol.  ii, 
afterwards  published  as  Outlines  of  the  Life  of  Christ, 
Edinburgh,  1906 ;  Studies  in  the  Synoptic  Problem,  ed. 
Sanday,  Oxford,  1911  ;  J.  A.  Robinson,  The  Study  of  the 
Gospels,  London,  1902 ;  J.  M.  Thompson,  The  Synoptic 
Gospels  arranged  in  Parallel  Columns,  Oxford,  1910. 

3.  Swete,  The  Apostles'  Creed;  Burn,  The  Apostles'  Creed, 
London,  1906;  The  Nicene  Creed,  London,  1909;  Bp.  Gibson, 
The  Thirty -nine  Articles,  London,  1898,  Exposition  of 
Articles  i-v  and  viii. 


312  DIPLOMA.  FOR   WOMKN   IN    KKLIQIOtJS   KNOWLEDGE. 

5.  Conybeare  and  Howson,  The  Life  and  Epistles  of  Si.  Paul; 

Hort,  Judaislic  Ghristianity,  Cambridge,  1894;  Ramsay, 
St.  Paul  the  Traveller  and  the  Roman  Citizen,  London,  1897  ; 
Rackham,  The  Acts  of  the  Apostles,  London,  1901  ;  Kirsopp 
Lake,  The  Earlier  Epistles  of  St.  Paul,  London,  1911. 

6.  Perry,  A  History  of  the  English  Church,  vols,  i,  ii,  London, 

1881  ;  A  History  of  the  Reformation  in  England,  London, 
1886;  Stephens  and  Hunt,  ^  History  of  the  English  Church, 
vols,  iii-vi,  London,  1899;  Stokes,  Ireland  and  the  Celtic 
Church  (ed.  6,  Lawlor),  London,  1907  ;  Ireland  and  the 
Anglo-Norman  Church,  London,  1889. 

7.  Procter  and  Frere,  A  History  of  the  Book  of  Cojnmon  Prayer, 

London,  1908  ;  Srawley,  The  Early  History  of  the  Liturgy, 
Cambridge,  1913;  Swete,  Church  Services  and  Service-books 
before  the  Reformation,  London,  1896  ;  Dowden,  The  Work- 
manship of  the  Prayer-Book,  London,  1899;  Further  Studies 
in  the  Prayer-Book,  London,  1908. 

8.  Foakes  Jackson,  History  of  the  Christian  Church  (to  451  a.d.), 

Cambridge,  1914;  Gwatkin,  Early  Church  History  (to 
313  A.D.),  London,  1912;  Bright,  The  Age  of  the  Fathers, 
London,  1903  ;  Bethune-Baker,  An  Introduction  to  the  Early 
History  of  Christian  Doctrine,  London,  1903. 

9.  Genesis :  Spurrell,  Notes  on  the  Hebrew  2'ezt  of  the  Book  of 

Genesis,  Oxford,  1896. 

Romans :  Sanday  and  Headlam  (Internat.  Crit.  Comm.), 
Edinburgh,  1902. 

Comparative  Study  of  Religions  :  W.  R.  Smith,  Lectures  on  the 
Religion  of  the  Semites,  London,  1894  ;  Cumont,  Les  Religions 
Orientales  dans  le  Paganisme  Romain,  Paris,  1909  ;  Geden, 
Studies  in  the  Religions  of  the  East,  London,  1913  ;  Jevons, 
Comparative  Religion,  Cambridge,  1913  ;  Legge,  Forerunners 
and  Rivals  of  Christianity,  Cambridge,  1915. 

In  addition  to  the  above,  articles  in  the  following  dictionaries  may 
frequently  be  consulted  with  advantage : — For  Papers  1,  2,  4,  5 — 
Hastings'  Dictionary  of  the  Bible  ;  for  Papers  7,  9  (Comparative  Study 
of  Religions)  —  Hastings'  Encyclopedia  of  Religion  and  Ethics;  for 
Paper  8 — Wace  and  Piercy's  Dictionary  of  Christian  Biography. 


(  »1^  ) 

This  Association  was  formed  in  1902,  under  the  sanction  of  the 
Board  of  Trinity  College,  with  the  object  of  assisting  Students 
and  Graduates  of  the  University  to  obtain  appointments  and 
employments  at  home  or  abroad,  under  the  Government  or 
otherwise. 

The  Executive  Committee  of  the  Association  keep  a  Register 
of  Students  and  Graduates  desiring  appointments,  with  a  record 
of  their  qualifications.  They  collect  and  supply  to  those  who 
register,  information  as  to  posts  vacant,  either  at  home  or  in  the 
Colonies,  in  the  various  branches  of  the  Civil  Service,  in  Medicine, 
Engineering,  Scholastic  work,  &c. ;  and  endeavour  to  place  appli- 
cants in  communication  with  Boards,  Firms,  Agencies,  &c.,  who 
desire  to  find  men  to  till  such  posts. 

Those  who  wish  to  place  their  names  on  the  Register  should 
obtain  from  the  Secretary  a  Form  of  Application,  and  subsequently 
should  notify  the  Secretary  in  case  of  change  of  address.  The 
Committee  will  not  undertake  to  recommend  for  an  appointment 
any  applicant  of  whose  fitness  they  are  not  satisfied. 

The  Committee  hope  that  Graduates  who  reside  at  a  distance 
will  join  the  Association  as  corresponding  members,  and  will 
co-operate  by  keeping  the  Secretary  informed  as  to  openings  that 
may  offer  in  different  lines. 

■  No  fees  are  charged. 

All  communications  should  be  addressed  to  the  Secretary. 

The  Executive  Committee  of  the  Association  is  now  constituted 
as  follows : — 

Alexander  Charles  O'Sullivan,  M.A.,  M.D.,  Senior  Fellow. 

William  Kennedy,  M.A.,  Fellow  and  Tutor. 

Ernest  Henry  Alton,  M.A.,  Fellow  and  Tutor. 

Sir  Robert  W.  Tale,  M.A.,  Fellow  and  Tutor. 

John   Joly,   M.A.,    Sc.D.,    Fellow,    Professor    of    Geology    and 

Mineralogy. 
Andrew   Francis   Dixon,    M.B.,    Sc.D.,  University   Professor  of 

Anatomy  and  Chirurgery. 
Sydney  Young,  Sc.D,,  University  Professor  of  Chemistry. 
James   Sinclair  Baxter,  LL.D.,  Regius  Professor  of  Feudal  and 

English  Law. 
Gilbert  Waterhouse,  M.A.,  Lilt.D.,  Professor  of  German. 
William  Robert  Fearon,  Sc.D. 
James  Thomas  Jackson,  M.A.,  M.A.I.,  Assistant  to  the  Professor 

ot  Civil  Engineering. 
Olive  Constance  Purser,  M.A.,  Lady  Registrar. 
John  Good,  Esq. 
Francis  La  Touche  Godfrey,  M.A,,  Fellow  and  Tutor,  Secrelnry. 

The  Committee  meets  once  a  month  during  Term,  and  as 
required  during  Vacation. 

P  ' 


(     314     ) 


Library  Hours. 

The  Library  is  open  on  week-days,  except  Saturday,  from  10  to 
4  o'clock,  from  February  1  to  October  31  ;  and  from  10  to  3 
o'clock  during  the  months  of  November,  December,  and  January  ; 
and  on  Saturdays  throughout  the  year  from  10  to  1  o'clock. 

The  Reading  Room  is  open  on  week-days  from  10  to  6  o'clock, 
except  during  the  months  of  July  and  August,  when  it  closes 
at  4  o'clock,  and  except  on  Saturdays  throughout  the  year,  when 
it  closes  at  1  o'clock. 

The  Reading  Room  is  also  open  in  the  evening  from  7  to  10 
o'clock,  except  on  Saturdays,  and  during  the  months  of  July  and 
August. 

The  Library  (including  the  Reading  Room)  is  closed  on 
Christmas  Day,  and  the  three  week-days  following  ;  on  Good 
Friday,  Easter  Eve,  and  Easter  Monday  ;  on  Monday  in  Whitsun 
"Week  ;  and  on  the  Bank  Holidays,  St.  Patrick's  Day,  the  King's 
Birthday,  and  the  first  Monday  in  August.  It  is  also  closed  for  a 
fortnight  in  July  at  a  date  fixed  in  the  Calendar. 

Admission  of  Readers. 

Life  Admission  is  granted  only  to  Graduates  of  the  Universities 
of  Dublin,  Oxford,  and  Cambridge. 

Six -month  tickets  are  issued  to  Undergraduates  of  Trinity 
College  in  their  Sophister  years. 

Six-month  tickets  are  issued  to  Undergraduates  in  their  Fresh- 
man years,  on  recommendation  by  their  tutor,  with  the  approval 
of  the  Board. 

Six-months'  tickets  may  be  granted  by  the  Provost,  on  the 
recommendation  of  the  Librarian,  to  strangers  not  being  Students 
or  Graduates.  To  avoid  overcrowding,  these  tickets  may  be 
restricted  so  as  to  idmit  only  between  specified  hours. 

All  readers,  on  admission,  are  required  to  make  and  sign  the 
Library  Declaration  before  the  Provost,  and  to  sign  the  Readers' 
Admission  Register. 

Temporary  permission  to  consult  specified  books  is  granted  to 
strangers  at  the  Librarian's  discretion. 

Historical  Summary.    • 
In  the  year  1 601 ,  the  Spanish  troops  were  defeated  by  the  English 
atKinsale,  and  Her  Majesty's  army,  to  commemorate  their  victory, 
subscribed  the  sum  of  £1800,  from  the  arrears  of  their  pay,  to  es- 
tablish in  the  University  of  Dublin  a  public  Library."  Dr.  Challoner 

*  Dr.  Mahaffy,  in  his  "  Epoch  in  Irish  Histoid,"  gives  a  different  account  of  this  ( 

matter. 


tlBRAKY  OF  TRINlTr  COLLKGK.  315 

and  Mr.  James  Ussher,  afterwards  the  celebrated  Archbishop,  were 
selected  by  the  benefactors  as  the  trustees  of  their  donation,  and 
commissioned  to  purchase  such  books  as  they  should  judge  most 
necessary  and  useful  for  the  advancement  of  learning.  "  And  it 
is  somewhat  remarkable"  (says  Dr.  Parr)  "that  at  this  time 
[1603],  when  the  said  persons  were  at  London  about  the  laying  out 
this  money  in  books,  they  then  met  Sir  Thomas  Bodley  there, 
buying  books  for  his  new  erected  Library  at  Oxford,  so  that  there 
began  a  correspondence  between  them  upon  this  occasion,  helping 
each  other  to  procure  the  choicest  and  best  books  on  several  subjects 
that  could  be  gotten ;  so  that  the  famous  Bodleian  Library  at 
Oxford,  and  that  of  Dublin,  began  together." 

The  private  collection  of  Ussher  himself,  consisting  of  10,000 
volumes,  with  many  MSS.  of  great  value,  was  the  iirst  donation  of 
moment  which  the  Library  received ;  and  for  this  also  literature 
is  indebted  to  the  officers  and  soldiers  of  the  English  army.  In 
1640,  Ussher  left  Ireland,  and  the  insurgents  soon  after  destroyed 
all  his  personal  property,  with  the  exception  of  his  books,  which 
were  fortunately  secured,  and  soon  after  conveyed  to  Chester,  and 
from  thence  to  London.*  In  1642,  Ussher  was  nominated  one  of  the 
Westminster  Assembly  of  Divines,  but  refused  to  attend,  and  even 

Eireached  against  their  proceedings  at  Oxford.  *•  For  this  crime  his 
ibrary,  or  a  portion  of  it,  which  he  had  left  behind  him  at  Chelsea 
College,  was  seized  and  confiscated  by  order  of  the  House  of  Com- 
mons, as  the  property  of  a  delinquent ;  but  John  Selden,  his  parti- 
cular friend,  by  the  interference  of  Dr.  Featly,  obtained  permission 
to  purchase  them  as  if  for  his  own  use,  though  really  for  the  pur- 
pose of  restoring  them  to  their  original  owner.  On  the  Archbishop's 
death  in  1655,  although  he  had  destined  his  books  for  Trinity  Col- 
lege, the  misfortunes  of  the  times  compelled  him  to  leave  them  to 
his  only  daughter,  Lady  Tyrrell,  then  mother  of  a  numerous  family,' 
and  in  narrow  circumstances.  Proposals  were  soon  after  made 
to  her  for  the  purchase  of  the  library,  by  the  King  of  Denmark  and 
Cardinal  Mazarin ;  but  Cromwell  issued  an  order  prohibiting  the 
Primate's  family  from  selling  it  without  his  consent,  and  he  refused 
to  permit  it  to  be  brought  out  of  the  kingdom.  Soon  after,  the  officers 
and  soldiers  of  the  army  then  in  Ireland,  wishing  to  emulate  those 
of  Elizabeth,  purchased  the  whole  Library  for  the  sum  of  £2200, 
together  with  all  the  Archbishop's  manuscripts,  and  a  choice  though 
not  numerous  collection  of  ancient  coins,  with  the  design  of  pre- 
senting them  to  the  College.  But  when  the  books  were  brought 
over  to  Ireland,  Cromwell  refused  to  permit  the  intentions  of  the 
donors  to  be  carried  into  effect,  alleging  that  it  was  his  intention  to 
found  a  new  College  or  Hall,  in  which  the  collection  might  more 
conveniently  be  preserved  separate  from  all  other  books.  The 
library,  therefore,  was  deposited  in  the  Castle  of  Dublin,  and  being 
there  kept  with  great  negligence,  an  immense  number  of  valuable 

•  Parr,  p.  47.  i>  Ibid.,  p.  60.  •  Ibid.,  p.  102 

p2 


316  LIBRARY  OF  TRINITY  COLLEGE. 

books  and  MSS.  were  stolen  or  destroyed.  At  length,  on  the  Re- 
storation, His  Majesty  King  Charles  II.  ordered  that  what  remained 
of  the  Primate's  library  should  be  given  to  the  University,  accord- 
ing to  the  generous  purpose  of  the  original  purchasers. 

In  1674,  Sir  Jerome  Alexander,  one  of  the  Justices  of  the  Com- 
mon Pleas  in  Ireland,  left  his  collection  of  law  books  to  the  College, 
with  £100  for  fitting  up  a  place  for  them ;  as  also  the  valuable 
MSS.  contained  in  Class  G  in  the  Manuscript  Room. 

In  the  year  1726,  the  Library  received  an  addition  of  upwards 
of  4000  volumes,  fromthe  books  bequeathed  to  it  byDr.Wm.Palliser, 
Archbishop  of  Cashel,  who  had  been  a  Fellow  of  the  College, 
and  also  during  his  lifetime  a  muniticent  benefactor  to  it.  The 
following  extract  from  his  will  contains  the  conditions  of  this 
valuable  bequest : — 

"  Item,  I  devise  unto  the  Provost,  Fellows,  and  Scholars  of  the 
College  of  the  Holy  Trinity  near  Dublin,  and  their  successors,  such  of 
my  books  of  all  kinds  as  they  now  have  not,  or  at  the  time  of 
my  death  shall  not  be  fiu-nished  with,  to  be  sorted,  and  set  out  by 
the  Rev.  Doctor  Claudius  Gilbert,  and  my  said  son,  William  Palliser. 
[tem,  1  devise  unto  the  said  Provost,  Fellows,  and  Scholars,  and 
mccessors,  such  editions  of  my  books  as  they  now  have  not, 
ar  at  the  time  of  mydeath  shall  not  be  furnished  with,  to  be  in  like 
manner  sorted  and  set  out  by  the  said  Doctor  Gilbert  and  my  said  son, 
William  Palliser.  Provided  always,  and  my  will  is,  that  the  editions' 
and  books  hereby  devised  shall  go  by  the  name,  and  be  always  called 
Bibliotheca  Palliseriana,  and  that  the  same  shall  be,  and  continue  placed 
and  kept  next  to  the  library  devised  to  the  Provost,  Fellows,  and  Scho- 
lars, by  the  late  Lord  Primate  Ussher,  now  called  JBibliotheca  Usseriana. 
And  my  farther  will  and  meaning  is,  that  if  the  said  Provost,  Fellows, 
and  Scholars,  or  their  successors,  shall  at  any  time  fail  to  call  the  editions 
and  books  hereby  devised  by  the  name  of  Bibliotheca  Falliseriatia,  or  shall 
at  any  time  fail  to  keep  them  next  to  the  said  library,  devised  by  the  late 
Lord  Primate  Ussher,  the  disposition  hereby  made  to  the  said  Provost, 
Fellows,  and  Scholars,  and  their  successors,  shall,  upon  such  failures 
become  void  and  of  no  effect." 

Another  most  valuable  addition  to  the  Library  was  the  collection 
of  Dr.  Claudius  Gilbert,  Vice-Provost  and  Regius  Professor  of 
Divinity,  consisting  of  nearly  13,000  volumes.  In  the  year  1735  ■ 
he  retired  on  the  living  of  Ardstraw,  and  soon  after  presented  hisj 
Library  to  the  College,  having  spent  his  whole  life  in  collecting' 
books  for  that  purpose.' 

In  1741,  Dr.  John  Stearne,  Bishop  of  Clogher,  and  Vice-Chan- 
cellor  of  the  University,  bequeathed  to  the  Library  the  valuable] 


»  The  following  passage  appears  in  the  "Annual  Register"  for  1759  :— 
"  Doctor  Claudius  Gilbert,  formerly  Vice-Provost  of  Trinity  College.  Dublin.  ThiseS'^ 
eellent  person  besides  other  valuable  donations,  beo.ueathed  lo  that  College  a  collection  ol 
books  consistingol  13.000  volumes,  chosen  with  greiitdiscemment  and  care.  Ilis  bust  was 
this  day  (Feb.  1, 1768)  placed  at  the  head  of  the  books.  It  is  the  workmanshio  of  Verproiln 
and  for  exoressioa  and  elegance  does  great  credit  to  the  taste  and  skill  of  the  Statuary^ 


LIBKAUy  OF  TRINITY  COLLEQK.  317 

collection  of  MSS.  preserved  in  Class  F  of  the  Manuscript  lloom, 
together  with  all  such  books  from  his  private  collection  as  were  not 
already  in  the  Library. 

Besides  these,  the  Manuscript  Library  is  indebted  to  Dr.  Miles 
Sumner,  admitted  a  Fellow  during  the  Commonwealth,  and  after- 
wards for  many  years  Donegal  Lecturer  in  Mathematics  in  the 
University  ;  to  Sir  William  Gore ;  Sir  Henry  Prescot ;  Dr.  Henry 
Jones,  Bishop  of  Meath  and  Vice-Chancellor  of  the  University 
Dr.  John  Parker,  Archbishop  of  Dublin ;  William  Barry,  M.A. 
John  Lyon,  M.  A.,  and  Librarian ;  Thomas  Hey  of  Chester  ("  Ces 
tensis  Signifer"),  A.D.    1646;   Gordian  Strowbridge;  Murtogh 
Dowling,  Esq.,  A.  D.  1693  ;  Charles  Willoughby,  M.  D. ;  Cornelius 
Higden ;  and  Edward  Worth,  M.  D.     Besides  these,  Peter  Carewe, 
President  of  Munster  in  the  reign  of  Elizabeth,  gaf  e  to  the  Li- 
brary a  valuable  collection  of  Irish  Manuscripts. 

In  1774,  the  sum  of  £100  was  bequeathed  to  the  Library  by 
Thomas  Holies,  Esq.,  to  be  applied  to  the  purchase  of  books  written 
by  English,  Irish,  or  Scotchmen,  upon  Politics,  Natural  and  Civil 
History,  and  Mathematics. 

A  very  considerable  addition  was  made  to  the  Library  in  the 
year  1802,  when  the  Fagel  Library ,  consisting  of  upwards  of  20,000 
Tolumes,  was  purchased  by  the  Board  of  Erasmus  Smith  for  £10,000, 
and  presented  to  the  University.  This  valuable  collection  was 
made  by  M.  Greffier  Fagel,  Pensionary  of  Holland,  and  in  1794, 
when  the  French  invaded  that  country,  was  removed  to  England 
for  sale,  and  there  purchased  for  the  College. 

In  the  year  1805,  a  small  but  choice  collection  of  books,  includ- 
ing many  Editiones  Principes  of  the  Classics,  was  bequeathed  to 
the  Library  by  Henry  George  Q,uiu,  Esq.,  under  the  conditions  ex- 
pressed in  the  following  extract  from  his  will,  dated  September  23, 
1794:— 


"  I  give  and  bequeath  my  large  mahogany  book-case,  together  with 
such  of  my  books  and  manuscripts  as  are  specified  in  a  catalogue  bound 
in  red  morocco  leather,  written  in  my  own  hand,  and  marked  with  the 
letters  L.T.  0.  D.,  which  book-case,  books,  and  manuscripts,  together  with 
the  catalogue  itself,  and  the  hammer  which  was  presented  to  me  at  Am- 
sterdam by  Signor  Crevanna,  I  give  and  bequeath  for  ever  to  the  Provost 
and  Fellows  of  Trinity  College,  Dublin,  in  order  that  they  may  be  placed 
in  the  Library  of  the  College.  And  as  most  of  the  books  hereby  be- 
queathed are  of  considerable  value,  and  on  that  account  the  more  liable 
to  be  stolen  if  placed  in  a  situation  easy  of  access,  it  is  my  will  and  de- 
sire that  they  be  deposited,  not  in  the  great  public  room  of  the  Library, 
but  in  that  part  of  it  called  the  Manuscript  Room.  And  it  is  my  will  that 
the  book- case  hereby  bequeathed  which  is  to  contain  them,  may  be  placed 
exactly  in  the  centre  of  the  side  of  the  room,  opposite  to  the  door  of  en- 
trance, and  I  desire  that  the  words  Bibliotheea  Quiniana,  in  capital  letters, 
two  inches  in  height,  and  gilt  on  a  dark-coloured  ground,  be  put  on  the 
top  of  the  two  central  doors  of  the  aforesaid  book-case,  one  word  on  each 


318  LIB  HART  OF  TlilNITY  COLLKGE. 

door.  And  it  is  my  will  and  desire,  that  the  said  book-case  be  generally 
kept  locked,  and  that  it  be  never  opened,  or  the  books  handled  by  any 
person,  but  in  presence  of  the  librarian  or  his  assistant,  one  of  whom  shall 
always  keep  the  key  thereof.  And  it  is  my  desire  that  none  of  the  books 
hereby  bequeathed  shall  ever  be  taken  out  of  the  Manuscript  Room.  I 
desire  likewise  that  none  of  them  shall  ever  be  rebound,  or  any  new  or 
additional  covering  or  lettering  of  any  kind  be  put  upon  them,  but  that 
they  shall  always  remain  precisely  in  the  same  state  wherein  they  siiall 
be  found  at  the  time  of  my  decease.  And  I  desire  that  a  copy  of  the 
part  of  my  will  which  relates  to  the  disposal  of  my  books  be  sent  by  my 
executors  to  the  Provost  and  Senior  Fellows,  within  one  month  after  my 
decease,  in  order  that  my  bequest  may,  in  every  particular,  be  fully  car- 
ried into  effect." 

The  Library  is  continually  increased  by  copies  of  every  book 
published  in  England.  This  privilege  it  enjoys  by  Act  of  Parlia- 
ment,* 54  Geo.  III.  cap.  156. 

In  addition  to  gifts  from  Colo7iial  and  Foreign  Governments, 
Universities,  Academies,  Institutions,  and  Societies  during  the 
year — 

Gifts  of  books,  &c.,  were  received  from  : — 

E.  C.  Anderson,  Mrs.  Beveridge,  Rt.  Rev.  Abbot  Butler,  Rev.  E. 
Buytaers,  Dr.  U.  Camera,  C.  Carpenter,  C.B.E.,  Lady  Clayton, 
G.  H.  Cooper,  J.  Cowan,  M.A.,  W.  H.  Cox,  B.A.,  Captain  Darling, 
W.  Dawson,  L.  L.  Dix,  B.A.,  E.  S.  Dodgson,  M.A.,  E.  G.  Fenton, 
J.  F.  Fuller,  Signora  A.  G